Archive for the ‘Export Data’ Category

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Metro Exports Continue to Rise in 2012

July 11, 2013

Natalie Soroka is an economist in the Office of Trade and Industry Information within the International Trade Administration where she focuses on international trade statistics and trends.

Five metro areas achieved more than $50 billion in 2012 exports.

Five metro areas achieved more than $50 billion in 2012 exports and ten surpassed $25 billion.

After hitting new highs in 2011, exports from U.S. metropolitan areas continued to increase in 2012, with 170 of the 370 metro areas with available data reporting record-high merchandise exports.

Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX topped the list as the largest metro exporter in 2012, shipping $110.3 billion of goods abroad.

Overall, many areas saw continued growth in 2012, with exports increasing in 220 metro areas from the previous year.

The Seattle, WA area saw the highest dollar growth in 2012, up $9.2 billion from 2011. Other areas showing high dollar growth included:

  • Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI (up $6.0 billion),
  • Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX (up $5.8 billion),
  • Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL (up $4.7 billion),
  • and Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV (up $4.4 billion).

While large areas like Houston, New York and Los Angeles contribute greatly to the value of exports from metropolitan areas sent around the world, exports are an important economic driver in smaller markets, too. In 2012, 153 small metro areas exported more than $1 billion of goods. Of these metros, exports from Bloomington, IN exceeded $1 billion for the first time in 2012.

Viewing exports from the metropolitan perspective is important, as these are concentrated areas for industries and economic activity. In 2011, 22 metropolitan areas represented more than 40 percent of their state’s total merchandise export activity.

One such area in 2012 was Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL, whose $47.9 billion in exports accounted for 69 percent of Florida’s total goods exports that year. Aerospace products and parts accounted for the largest share of Miami’s exports, amounting to $4.8 billion in 2012. Other top export categories from Miami that year were computer and peripheral equipment ($4.1 billion) and communications equipment ($3.5 billion).

Of the metro areas in Florida where data is available, 11 MSAs reported increased exports in 2012, led by increases in Miami, Lakeland, and Orlando. On the local level, areas often benefit from geographic proximity and economic or cultural ties to a particular country or region. In fact, Latin American partners dominate Miami’s exports.  Miami exported $18.3 billion of goods to South American markets in 2012, led by Miami’s top market: Venezuela ($5.6 billion). Other top Miami markets in 2012 were Colombia ($2.8 billion), Brazil ($2.6 billion), Mexico ($2.1 billion), and Chile ($2.0 billion).

Miami was also the top exporter to the Dominican Republic-Central America Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) region in 2012, exporting nearly $5.0 billion to this market in 2012, more than a quarter of which (27 percent) went to the Dominican Republic. Miami actually exported more to the six CAFTA members than it did to either the EU or our NAFTA partners.

While it’s too early to determine any effect from the new free trade agreements with Colombia and Panama, in 2012 Miami was the second largest metro exporter to both of these regions, indicating that it stands to benefit from increased trade with these markets in the future.

This data displays the importance exports are to not only our national economy, but to local economies throughout the country. Exports strengthen local economies and create millions of jobs.

In 2012, exporters reached an all-time record of $2.2 trillion in U.S. exports, supporting 9.8 million jobs. The Department of Commerce has collaborated with the Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program in order to create the Metropolitan Export Initiative. This initiative’s goal is to promote exports and investments in metropolitan regions through localized export plans.

Beginning with the release of 2012 data, information on exports by county and 4-digit NAICS industry code are available for the top 50 U.S. metro areas.

Visit ITA’s Metropolitan Export Series homepage for more information on metropolitan area exports, including data, fact sheets for the top 50 exporting MSAs in 2012, an overview of U.S. Metropolitan Area Exports, and the U.S. Trade Overview with new regional spotlights.

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Promoting U.S. Exports of Environmental Technology

May 31, 2013

On the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) blog, Marc Lemmond highlights the work EPA has done to promote exports of U.S. environmental technologies.

The environmental technology sector is a huge contributor to the American economy. It had an estimated revenue of $312 billion in 2012, employing 1.7 million Americans.

Another important note: promoting exports of environmental technology promotes environmental stewardship around the world. EPA partners with several federal agencies on its Trade and Economics Program to promote the trade and environment agenda globally.

This is important work, helping support the American economy and proliferating technology that helps preserve the world around us.

You can read more on the EPA’s blog, “It’s Our Environment.”

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U.S. Exporters Reach Record High in 2011

May 13, 2013

Natalie Soroka is an economist in the Office of Trade and Industry Information within the International Trade Administration where she focuses on international trade statistics and trends.

Small- and Medium-sized enterprises produce more than 50 percent of known exports in five states. The national average is for such businesses to produce 33.3 percent of known exports for each state.

In five states, Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) produce more than 50 percent of known exports for the state.

This month the International Trade Administration released its overview report on U.S. Exporting Companies in 2011. This overview is based on the Census Bureau’s Profile of U.S. Importing and Exporting Companies, 2010-2011.

This report, a joint project between Census and the International Trade Administration (ITA), details the characteristics of U.S. merchandise trading companies in 2010 and 2011, including information on company size, industry, geographic composition, and top export markets.

The report shows some interesting data and helps show how services like those offered at ITA can help Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) begin exporting or increase their exports. Businesses of any size can contact their nearest Export Assistance Center to find out how we can help.

In 2011, more than 300,000 U.S. companies exported goods, an increase of more than 8,200 since the previous year and up by more than 25,600 companies since the beginning of the National Export Initiative (NEI) in 2009.

Manufacturers accounted for the largest portion of known export value (that is, export transactions that can be linked to a specific company), much of it from large firms. However, when you look at the number of exporters, manufacturing firms only account for about a quarter of U.S. exporters, with smaller and medium-sized firms accounting for many of the non-manufacturing companies.

In fact, SMEs, which have fewer than 500 employees, accounted for 98 percent of U.S. exporters in 2011.

With regard to markets, exporters largely ship goods to markets in North America (namely, NAFTA partners Canada and Mexico), with 43 percent of exporters shipping merchandise to this region.

The number of companies exporting to the Pacific Rim region has also shown significant growth in recent years, up by more than 12,000 since 2009, nearly all of which were SMEs. Among the top 25 U.S. export markets in 2011, the number of exporters to Australia showed the highest increase, up by nearly 2,700 exporters since 2010.

SMEs account for a third of goods exports on average, but in markets like Switzerland, Hong Kong, the United Arab Emirates, Turkey, India, and Israel, SMEs account for more than 40 percent of known U.S. exports.

On a state level, California reported the most identified exporters in 2011, at more than 75,000, followed by Florida, New York, Texas, and Illinois. SMEs play an important role in many states’ exports, in particular accounting for more than half of goods exports from five states, which includes the states of New York and Florida, both among the top state exporters.

Overall, SMEs in particular would benefit from further expanding into new markets. In 2011, more than half (59 percent) of SMEs exported to a single foreign market. In contrast, 55 percent of large companies exported to five or more countries.

Compared with big companies, most SMEs do not possess offshore business affiliates that can be used to circumvent trade barriers and gain market access.

That’s why U.S. government initiatives to open foreign markets can especially benefit smaller U.S. exporters. If your SME needs help gaining access to foreign markets, you can contact your nearest Export Assistance Center to find out how we can help your business, regardless of its size.

For more information, read the full overview.

(This post was updated to correct an error in the first paragraph.)

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Building Exports in the Construction Industry

April 24, 2013

Kit Rudd is the Senior International Trade Specialist responsible for Construction Machinery in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Transportation and Machinery.

When it comes to export The U.S. pavilion at the baum 2013 trade show.growth, U.S. manufacturers of construction machinery and related equipment are building something special.

With more than $47 billion in exports in 2012, and 89 percent growth since 2009,  the sector is strongly supporting President Obama’s National Export Initiative goal of doubling American exports by the end of 2014.

Infrastructure growth around the world is driving demand for construction machinery and related equipment. When it comes to trade promotion in this field, there are few better venues than bauma 2013, the International Trade Fair for Construction Machinery, Building Material Machines, Mining Machines, Construction Vehicles, and Construction Equipment.

Held April 15-21, in Munich, Germany, this year’s event attracted more than 3,200 exhibitors, including 288 from the United States. The International Trade Administration (ITA) was there to support U.S. exhibitors, counseling more than 30 U.S. companies on how ITA can help them compete and succeed globally.

Senior International Trade Specialist Kit Rudd of the Manufacturing and Services (MAS) Machinery Team, and Commercial Service (CS) Specialists Bettina Capurro of Munich and Marino Konno of São Paulo represented ITA, working with American companies and arranging presentations on the construction markets in Brazil and Chile.

If your business is new-to-market, new-to-export, or even if you’re already a successful exporter, ITA can help you build a foundation and grow your business. Visit export.gov to get started.

(note: 2012 trade data is based on North American Industry Classification System [NAICS] codes 333120 [Construction Machinery]; 333131 [Mining Machinery and Equipment]; 333618 [Other Engine equipment]; 333995 [Fluid Power Cylinders and Actuators]; and 333996 [Fluid Power Pumps and Motors])

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Recognizing Three Years of Export Growth

March 12, 2013

Francisco Sánchez serves as the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade. A trend of rising exports since 2009 culminated in a record $2.2 trillion in exports in 2012, supporting 9.8 million American jobs.

During the last several weeks, we’ve highlighted a lot of great news in the business of U.S. exports.

From record exports in travel and tourism to successes in gaining access for American companies to foreign markets, 2012 gave us a lot to be proud of in the field of exports. More important than just the dollar amounts is the fact that almost 10 million jobs were supported by these exports in 2012.

This success is the direct result of a concentrated initiative introduced by President Obama in 2010, one that has coordinated the efforts of several U.S. government agencies to increase American exports and create American jobs. Under the National Export Initiative (NEI), we’ve seen U.S. exports increase from $1.58 trillion in 2009, to a record $2.2 trillion in 2012.

We recognize the third anniversary of the NEI this week, so we’ll be sharing some of the successes we’ve seen under this initiative over the next several days.

I hope you will get in on the conversation. How have exports helped your business? How can the International Trade Administration and other government agencies help you increase exports? Follow some of America’s core export-promotion agencies on this Twitter list to learn about the government’s efforts to help U.S. business.

As always, ITA is here to help any U.S. company looking to create or increase exports. It all starts with a visit to one of our Export Assistance Centers or to export.gov.

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U.S. Trade and Exports Support 9.8 Million American Jobs

February 26, 2013

Tyler Braswell is an intern for the International Trade Administration’s Office of Public Affairs. He is studying International Business at George Washington University.Data from the Department of Commerce show that U.S. exports in 2012 totaled nearly $2.2 trillion, a record for American exports.

According to new data, in 2012, U.S. exports reached a record $2.2 trillion dollars – the largest annual export total in U.S. history. This 2012 total exceeds the previous year’s record high of $2.1 trillion.

Further, U.S. exports supported 9.8 million jobs in 2012, which means that U.S. exports have supported an additional 1.3 million jobs since the launch of the President’s National Export Initiative.

This growth is reflective of the efforts put forth by the International Trade Administration (ITA) and related government agencies.

As a student who will graduate with a degree in international business, I appreciate the focus the International Trade Administration places on expanding the U.S. economy beyond our borders. Specifically, this focus gives me hope that my particular degree and specialization will result in employment once I graduate.

The overall goal of the U.S. Department of Commerce is to promote job creation, economic growth, sustainable development, and improved standards of living for all Americans. Market development, expansion, and constant reform are vital to the success of the U.S. economy. It is exciting to know that President Obama is a major proponent of these ideas.

The President’s National Export Initiative and the supporting strategies created here at ITA are producing results – tangible results we are seeing through the jobs the increase in exports is supporting.

It is also exciting to know that the nearly 10 million jobs that exports support are in all 50 states and a range of industries. Here at ITA we will continue to do all we can to help U.S. businesses expand their exports in order to assist the American workers whose jobs these exports support.

Business looking to create or increase exports can visit www.export.gov to find out how ITA can help.

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U.S. Recognizes Another Year of Export Growth

February 8, 2013

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Francisco Sánchez serves as the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade. Mark Doms serves as the Under Secretary of Commerce for Economic Affairs. This post also appears on the Department of Commerce blog.

Last year was another record-setting year for U.S. exporters.

Data released today show that in 2012, American exports totaled $2.2 trillion, eclipsing the previous record of $2.1 trillion in exports in 2011.

Data from the Department of Commerce show that U.S. exports in 2012 totaled nearly $2.2 trillion, a record for American exports.

Data from the Department of Commerce show that U.S. exports in 2012 totaled $2.2 trillion, a record for American exports.

This represents more than just numbers on a spreadsheet; it’s further proof that “Made in the USA” products are in demand all over the world.  It also means that more U.S. businesses are seizing the great opportunities in the global markets, continuing to help pave our nation’s road to economic recovery.

The increase in U.S. exports continues an upward trend that began in 2009. This trend has contributed to the creation of 6.1 million American private-sector jobs during the last 35 months. It is a direct result of President Obama’s National Export Initiative, part of a government strategy to strengthen our economy, support the creation of American jobs, and ensure long-term growth.

We are making historic progress toward the President’s goal of doubling exports by the end of 2014. Data show significant export growth in agriculture, motor vehicles, aerospace, and travel and tourism. The U.S. also continued to dominate exports in the services industry, worth over $632 billion, an increase of $26.4 billion over the previous year. This gave us a $195 billion trade surplus for services, which is a record surplus for the services industry.

Data show that U.S. exports with free trade partners in 2012 grew at nearly twice the rate as with the rest of the world.There was significant growth in trade with the 20 countries sharing trade partnerships with the U.S. Exports to these countries grew at nearly twice the rate of exports to the rest of the world and represented nearly half of all U.S. exports in 2012. Exports to Panama and Colombia, two countries with which the U.S. entered trade agreements in 2012, achieved record highs.

U.S. businesses continue to face the challenge of slow growth in the global economy. That is why the Obama administration continues to do everything possible to support American farmers, workers, and businesses as they compete in the global marketplace. As the record data show, this work benefits American exporters and the U.S. economy.

We will continue to expound on the data here on the Tradeology blog, the Economic Statistics Administration blog, and on Twitter. You can also find a copy of the data here.

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Brief Review of U.S. SME Trading Companies in 2010

December 6, 2012

David Moore is an economist in the Office of Trade and Industry Information within the International Trade Administration.

This week the International Trade Administration’s Office of Trade and Industry Information released an annual update to its website for the U.S. Commerce Department’s Exporter Database (EDB) for 2010. This joint project with the U.S. Census Bureau’s Foreign Trade Division is the cornerstone of ITA’s Trade Data Enhancement Initiative, the goal of which is to develop and disseminate improved statistical information on U.S. international trade and its role in the U.S. economy. Additional information on the EDB can be obtained by viewing the U.S. Census Bureau’s Profile of U.S. Exporting Companies, 2009-2010.

In 2010, more than 293,000 U.S. companies exported goods, up 6.0 percent from the revised 2009 estimate of 276,600. In 2010, nearly 98 percent of U.S. exporters (286,661) were small or medium-sized companies (SMEs*) with fewer than 500 employees, a 6.1 percent increase over 2009. Further, the known merchandise export value of SMEs rose to $383.4 billion in 2010, up 24.1 percent from 2009 and this accounted for 33.7 percent of the $1,138 billion total known merchandise export value of all companies.

Known Merchandise Export Value of Trading Companies, 2009 and 2010 in U.S. dollars. All identified companies $940,400,000 in 2009 and $1,137,600,000. SME's $308,900,000 in 2009 and $383,400,000 in 2010. Companies with 500 or more employees $631,500,000 in 2009 and $754,200,000 in 2010.

SME Exports at the State Level

SME exports are concentrated in the largest exporting states, with the top four exporting more than $30 billion from SMEs.  California had the largest value of SME exports ($68.1 billion) in 2010, followed by Texas ($51.2 billion), New York ($34.4 billion), and Florida ($33.6 billion).

SME export value at the state level in U.S. dollars. California: $68,087,967,616, Texas: $51,200,446,724, New York: $34,394,384,363, Florida: $33,557,306,907, New Jersey: $15,122,026,840, Illinois: $14,445,622,703, Pennsylvania: $12,519,691,700, Washington: $11,017,998,632, Michigan: $10,506,510,110, Massachusetts: $10,051,122,079, Ohio: $9,321,029,844, Louisiana: $8,806,538,601, Georgia: $8,448,288,399, Puerto Rico: $7,051,941,052, Minnesota: $5,740,296,134, Oregon: $5,649,311,876, North Carolina: $5,599,660,584, Wisconsin: $5,531,778,198, Connecticut: $5,372,732,418, Indiana: $4,974,567,439, Virginia: $4,139,241,848, Tennessee: $4,023,677,667, Missouri: $3,775,289,203, Arizona: $3,578,474,711, Kentucky: $3,484,101,860, Kansas: $3,258,410,258, Maryland: $2,819,330,154, Colorado: $2,671,823,591, South Carolina: $2,632,285,300, Utah: $2,584,426,888, Alabama: $2,561,215,935, New Hampshire: $1,776,065,210, Iowa: $1,745,671,009, Oklahoma: $1,622,778,640, Nebraska: $1,409,866,973, Mississippi: $1,407,996,974, Nevada: $1,210,149,129, West Virginia: $1,144,895,941, Montana: $1,059,154,716, Rhode Island: $1,054,668,411, Idaho: $1,031,234,308, Maine: $992,455,877, Arkansas: $898,080,029, Delaware: $775,404,661, District Of Columbia: $688,447,135, New Mexico: $680,508,632, North Dakota: $562,363,709, South Dakota: $443,896,862, Alaska: $394,898,004, Hawaii: $161,527,055, Wyoming: $141,245,194, Vermont: No data available for Vermont in 2010.

Note: SME values for Vermont are unavailable for 2010.

However, SME exporters represent a large share of the value of U.S. exports in both small and large states.  79 percent of Montana’s exports in 2010 were from SMEs, the highest share in the nation.  Florida, Rhode Island, Wyoming, and New York all had an SME share of exports over 50% as well.

Selected state SME share of exports: Montana: 79%, Florida: 68%, Rhode Island: 63%,   Wyoming: 56%, New York: 55%.

SME Exporters at the Metropolitan Level

The New York metro area had the largest number of known SME exporters at 32,300, followed closely by Los Angles (32,100), Miami (26,300), Chicago (13,300), and Houston (10,500).  Further world destination break-outs by the European Union-27, NAFTA, ASEAN, and DR-CAFTA are shown below. Other country groupings such as APEC and OPEC can also be accessed using the EDB website.

Number of Known SME Exporting Companies to Select World Regions by Metro. New York Metro: 11,645 to the EU, 10,540 to NAFTA, 2,370 to DR-CAFTA, and 3,436 to ASEAN; Los Angeles Metro: 8,938 to the EU, 12,242 to NAFTA, 1,947 to DR-CAFTA, and 4,548 to ASEAN; Miami Metro: 4,194 to the EU, 3,985 to NAFTA, 5,730 to DR-CAFTA, and 1,234 to ASEAN; Chicago Metro: 4,184 to the EU, 6,639 to NAFTA, 910 to DR-CAFTA, and 1,614 to ASEAN; Houston Metro: 2,640 to the EU, 3,653 to NAFTA, 649 to DR-CAFTA, and 1,740 to ASEAN.

SME Exporters at the Five-Digit Zip Code Level

Of the 25,754 zip-codes in the U.S. reporting at least one SME exporter, nine of these zip-codes reported one thousand or more SME exporters. Miami had the largest concentration in five zip codes (33166, 33172, 33178, 33122, 33126), followed by New York in three zip codes (10036, 10018 and 10001) and Los Angeles in one (90021).  Further, 673 zip-codes reported between 100 – 923 known SME exporters, while the remaining balance of zip codes reported between 1 and 99.

SME Exporters by zip code. In Miami, zip code 33166 has 4,023 SME exporters, zip code   33172 has 2,317 SME exporters, zip code 33178 has 2,033 SME exporters, zip code 33122   has 1,573 SME exporters and zip code 33126 has 1,203 SME exporters. In New York, zip   code 10036 has 1,625 SME exporters, zip code 10036 has 1,354 SME exporters, and zip code   10001 has 1,273 SME exporters. In Los Angeles, zip code 90021 has 1,109 SME exporters.

In closing, the EDB offers a whole host of information on U.S. exporters, not only by company size and type (manufacturers, wholesalers and other non-manufacturing firms) but also by 3 and 4 digit NAICS product codes, and export country destination, etc. This is just a small slice of EDB data available on our website, but we encourage U.S. companies and professionals working in global trade, policy, cooperation and promotion to utilize this snap-shot of 2010 as they continue to map out their strategies for export success in the future.

*SMEs are defined as firms that have fewer than 500 employees. All figures in this overview include only identifiable or “known” exports, i.e., exports that can be linked to individual companies using information on U.S. export declarations.

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Metro Exports Driving Economic Growth

September 18, 2012

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Michael Masserman and Ashley Zuelke work in the Office of  Export Policy, Promotion & Strategy.

Here’s a fact:  the 100 largest metro areas in our country make up just 12% of land area – but they make up 65% of our population and 75% of our nation’s GDP.  So when it comes to export growth, it should come as no surprise that metro areas are leading the way.

What may surprise you, is that thirteen smaller metropolitan areas across the U.S. — from Asheville, N.C., to Green Bay, Wisc., to Yakima, Wash. — for the first time joined the club of metropolitan markets that exported more than $1 billion in merchandise to the world.  These metro areas exported U.S. goods such as machinery, transportation equipment, and computer and electronic products which are in great demand all over the world.

The achievement of these thirteen metropolitan areas and recently released national data for 2011 metropolitan exports confirms the historic progress we are making toward reaching the President’s National Export Initiative (NEI) goal of doubling U.S. exports by the end of 2014.

The thirteen first-time members of the $1 billion metro export club represent just one story the recent data tells.

Metropolitan exports increased nearly 40 percent since 2009 to total $1.31 trillion in 2011.

This significant increase in U.S. exports since 2009 contributes to our ongoing recovery from the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression.

The Detroit, Mich., metropolitan area exported $49.4 billion in 2011, registering for the first time above $49 billion since the 2007 pre-Recession level.  Detroit was the fourth largest export market in the U.S. in 2011, with its top export sectors including transportation equipment and machinery. In fact, at the national level, exports of motor vehicles and parts increased $51 billion, or 63 percent, between 2009 and 2011 and are still leading the way with $86.3 billion in exports through the first seven months of 2012– reflecting a vibrant and resurgent car and truck industry.

Los Angeles was the third largest metropolitan export market in 2011, with $72.7 billion in exports.  LA has also been a pilot city for the Metropolitan Export Initiative, a program that the Department of Commerce International Trade Administration has partnered with the Brookings Institute on to localize export policy and promotion efforts, and build a framework for long-term export growth.

These stories, and the ones throughout the country, reflect how metro areas drive our exports. Yet each community and metro has its own character, opportunities and needs.

Communities and metropolitan areas can leverage exports as an economic development tool.  Each metro, even without a structured initiative, has the potential to organize local economic leaders, evaluate its own export assets and potential, and develop a plan to make the most of that potential.  Small businesses need to know that through exporting comes tremendous opportunity, and that there are federal resources in metro areas across our country, such as the local U.S. Export Assistance Centers and Small Business Development Centers, that stand ready to help them with this.

Our Administration will do everything it can to help U.S. businesses succeed in the global marketplace so that next year we can see even more metros cross that $1 billion threshold.

International Trade Administration resources also are there to help. Find your local U.S. Export Assistance Center here and visit Export.gov to get started.

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TAKE-OFF! (traveling, that is) New Travel Indicators Website Launched

April 25, 2012

Iris Ferguson works in the Office of the Under Secretary within the International Trade Administration

Spring is in the air, and we here at the International Trade Administration are busy coming up with fresh ideas.

Our latest creation is the launch of ITA’s first-ever travel indicators website.  It comes just in time for the international Pow Wow show in L.A., where we’ve had lots of great conversations on boosting travel and tourism to and within the U.S.

The graph shows the number of B1/B2 visas issued in Fiscal Years 2009, 2010 and 2011 in China, Brazil, India and the remainder of visa-issuing posts worldwide.

The graph shows the number of B1/B2 visas issued in Fiscal Years 2009, 2010 and 2011 in China, Brazil, India and the remainder of visa-issuing posts worldwide.

What’s on this travel indicators site, you ask? Well, in addition to basic travel tips, it contains a set of 15 graphs that have tons of useful information for the travel and tourism industry and foreign visitors.

Ever wanted to know the average wait times at six major airports for international arrivals processing?  Or wanted the latest on airline capacity in key markets?  Well now you can check them out on our travel indicator website.
Of particular interest are the graphs on visa wait times.  Visitors can see how the State Department’s recent initiatives to increase staff, extend interview hours, and expand facilities have dramatically decreased the time it takes to get a visa in key markets, like Brazil.  Being able to see these average wait times in China, Brazil, and India is great news for international travelers looking to plan ahead.

We’re working to update this site monthly, so you’ll have the latest info coming in from the Departments of Commerce, State, and Homeland Security.

Go check it out for yourself!

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