Archive for the ‘Trade Finance’ Category

h1

Global Connect: Arizona Trade Finance Seminar: A Must Attend Seminar to Learn How to Access Capital and Financing for Exports

February 13, 2014

Yuki Fujiyama is a trade finance specialist with the Office of Finance and Insurance Industries in the International Trade Administration.

The Arizona Trade Finance Seminar takes place Feb. 21, 2014 at the Thunderbird School of Management.

The U.S. Department of Commerce is partnering with a number of local organizations and federal agencies in offering The Global Connect: Arizona Trade Finance Seminar at the Thunderbird School of Global Management on February 21 in Glendale, Ariz.

This seminar will be available in person and via teleconference, covering a series of important export finance subjects:

  • How to get paid from export sales;
  • Ways to approach and work with banks to enter and grow in global markets;
  • Steps to access export working capital and trade credit;
  • How to increase export sales;
  • Methods of receiving payment in foreign currencies;
  • U.S. government export assistance resources; and
  • Global business development resources for minority-owned businesses.

Global Connect: Arizona will bring together experts from both the public and private sectors to discuss resources available to U.S. exporters. This applies to businesses of any size for their financing needs.

One-on-one counseling sessions are also available to provide export finance guidance specific to the needs of your organization.

Support for Hispanic-Owned Businesses

This training is open to businesses Across the United States, there are 2.3 million Hispanic-owned businesses, according to the latest data, and more than 10 percent of Arizona businesses are Hispanic-owned.

Data also show that minority-owned businesses are twice as likely to export as other U.S. firms. As Hispanic-owned businesses in Arizona and across the country look outside U.S. borders for more sales, it will be important for them to understand their finance options.

This session will be a crucial educational tool for these business leaders, and a great augmentation to the International Trade Administration’s Spanish-language Trade Finance Guide. 

Co-Sponsors and Partners

This session is made possible through cooperation among several local, state, and federal organizations:

We hope to see you at the event, so be sure to register today! For more information, please visit the Office of Finance and Insurance Industries.

h1

How Are Escrow Services Used In International Trade Transactions?

September 25, 2013

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Andrew K. Sokol is General Manager of Emerging Markets at Escrow.com, an International Trade Administration Strategic Partner.

The Trade Finance Guide is a helpful guide for U.S. companies that want to learn the basics of trade finance.

The Trade Finance Guide is a helpful guide about the basics of trade finance.

About a year ago, Professor David Wyld, Robert Maurin Professor of Management at Southeastern Louisiana University, wrote an article titled, “Securing the Transaction: The Advantages of Using Online Escrow Services Versus Letters of Credit in International Trade.” In that article, Professor Wyld predicts that with the use of escrow services, “we will see a growth in exporting (and importing) activities around the globe.”

The question is…what is an escrow service and how is it used in international trade transactions?

The International Trade Administration’s Trade Finance Guide (TFG) says an escrow service is a cash-in-advance option available to exporters and importers that reduces the potential risk of fraud. It acts as a trusted third party that collects, holds and disburses funds according to exporter and importer instructions.

Here’s how it works: the importer sends the agreed purchase amount to the escrow service. After payment is verified, the exporter is instructed to ship the goods. Upon delivery, the importer has a pre-determined amount of time to inspect and accept the goods. Once accepted, the funds are released by the escrow service to the exporter. The escrow fee can either be paid in full by one party or split evenly between the exporter and the importer.

The TFG also points out that, as an exporter, any sale is a gift until payment is received. And, because getting paid in full and on time is the ultimate goal for the seller in each sale, an appropriate payment method must be chosen carefully to minimize the payment risk while also accommodating the needs of the buyer.

But, as illustrated in the TFG, different payment types present different risks to exporters than to importers. And for a variety of reasons, not all of the identified methods of payment are available, or desirable, to either exporters or importers. Here’s how the risk levels are illustrated in the TFG:

For exporters, the most secure payment method is cash in advance, followed by letters of credit, documentary collections, open account and consignment. For importers, the list is reversed in a measure of security. More information is available in the Trade Finance Guide.

The Trade Finance Guide shows how some payment methods are more secure than others, depending on whether you are an importer or an exporter.

For the first time, however, the new 2012 edition of the TFG includes escrow services for “transactions with importers who demand assurance that the goods will be sent in exchange for advance payment” and states that “escrow in international trade is a service that allows both exporter and importer to protect a transaction by placing the funds in the hands of a trusted third party until a specified set of conditions are met.”

In other words, escrow services can offer a mutually beneficial cash-in-advance method for both parties. Plus, offering escrow services as a method of payment can actually add potential importers to U.S. exporters. In many cases, deals just don’t happen due to a payment related “issue” – and one example might be that you, as the exporter, require payment in full and up-front but the importer is reluctant to send the money until they receive the goods. In this case, by offering escrow services, both parties can be satisfied, the payment issue is resolved, and the deal closes. Cross-border escrow services are offered by international banks and firms that specialize in escrow and other deposit and custody services.

Like with any new business opportunity, if you are considering the use of escrow services, do your due diligence and make sure the one you choose is licensed and accredited. You can also verify the service you choose to do business with via:

(Editor’s Note: This post focuses on one of several possible methods for receiving payments for exports. It is not intended to be an endorsement of escrow services or any organization that provides escrow services. More information is available in the Trade Finance Guide.)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 345 other followers