Archive for the ‘Trade Shows’ Category

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Exports Take Flight at the 2015 Paris Air Show

June 22, 2015

This post originally appeared on the Department of Commerce blog.

Post by Marcus D Jadotte

Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Industry & Analysis Marcus Jadotte, Secretary of the Air Force Deborah James, U.S. Ambassador to France Jane Hartley, Senators Shelby and Cochran, and many other distinguished visitors join Tom Kallman, President and CEO of Kallman Worldwide, with the ribbon cutting ceremony that opened the U.S. International Pavilion at the 2015 Paris Air Show

Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Industry & Analysis Marcus Jadotte, Secretary of the Air Force Deborah James, U.S. Ambassador to France Jane Hartley, Senators Shelby and Cochran, and many other distinguished visitors join Tom Kallman, President and CEO of Kallman Worldwide, with the ribbon cutting ceremony that opened the U.S. International Pavilion at the 2015 Paris Air Show

Last week, I was honored to represent the Department of Commerce at the 51st International Paris Air Show. The Paris Air Show is the largest in the world, attracting participation from high-level government officials from across the globe, and CEOs from major U.S. and foreign aerospace companies. Every two years, the air show in Paris is the best place to see the latest technologies in the aerospace industry and to meet potential business partners from around the world.

This year, the United States had the largest international pavilion at the show with 200 U.S. companies participating. The breadth and depth of technology on display made it obvious why each year the aerospace industry has the largest trade surplus of any manufacturing industry. In 2014, U.S. aerospace companies exported more than $138.4 billion worth of equipment to markets around the world, supporting more than 500,000 jobs across the country.

At the air show, U.S. companies had the opportunity to meet with representatives from more than 2,200 companies from around the world. The International Trade Administration (ITA) has worked with pavilion organizer Kallman Worldwide for more than 15 years to help U.S. exhibitors get the most out of the show. From June 15-18, industry experts and commercial specialists from ITA’s domestic and international teams were on hand in Paris to counsel companies and help them make connections well beyond Le Bourget Airfield. In the weeks leading up to the show, we conducted webinars for companies to help prepare them to maximize their participation in this year’s air show. Webinar topics included export controls, export financing, EU customs regulations, and air show logistics.

ITA was pleased to partner with our colleagues from the Departments of Defense and State to coordinate efforts to increase aerospace defense exports at this year’s air show. Working in concert with our partners improves our ability to facilitate success for U.S. companies, and helps to improve national security.

During the air show, I met with many government and company representatives to discuss their future plans and business goals. More and more, companies are realizing that success in the aerospace industry requires having a thoughtful plan for targeting opportunities beyond U.S. borders. In fact, the highest growth markets for aviation are outside North America, and with that growth comes additional business. Companies, and their governments, need to be prepared to navigate the accompanying challenges with expanded growth and increased business. I’m proud to say that ITA stands ready and able to help U.S. companies plan their export strategy, answer questions and address challenges head-on.

While in Paris, we had the opportunity to promote our upcoming National Aerospace FDI Exhibition. The event, which takes place in Los Angeles from October 26-28, will showcase the prowess of the American aerospace industry and highlight the many opportunities for investors. Our partner for this event is the Aerospace States Association, which brings together the combined efforts of U.S. state governments. We anticipate that this forum will create new business opportunities and new jobs in communities across the country. We look forward to seeing everyone in Los Angeles!

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3 Groundbreaking Mega-Trends on View at CES 2015

January 26, 2015

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Jesse M. Lapierre is the Principal Commercial Officer at the U.S. Consulate in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia.

International CES 2015 represented the perfect nexus of American innovation and global participation, with over 160,000 visitors and 2 million square feet of the newest and most innovative products limited not just to consumer electronics, but representing a whole new world of human and technological interaction. As a part of Commerce’s International Buyer Program (IBP), our US Ambassador and I led a delegation of 45 Saudi companies to the show, and came away with some seriously groundbreaking mega-trends which I’d like to share with the ITA blogosphere.

U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia, Joseph W. Westphal, at breakfast with the delegation of Saudi Arabian companies brought to the International Electronics Show on January 8, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada by the U.S. Department of Commerce's International Buyer Program.

U.S. Ambassador to Saudi Arabia, Joseph W. Westphal, at breakfast with the delegation of Saudi Arabian companies brought to the International Electronics Show on January 8, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada by the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Buyer Program (IBP).

The IBP is a joint government-industry effort that brings thousands of international buyers to the United States for business-to-business matchmaking with U.S. firms exhibiting at major industry trade shows. Every year, the IBP results in approximately a billion dollars in new business for U.S. companies, and increased international attendance for participating U.S. trade show organizers.

The first, and most ubiquitous, mega-trend was that of the Internet of Everything (IoE), which was described in great detail by Intel’s CEO Brian Krzanich. In his view, we are now on the cusp of a revolution of roughly the same magnitude as the one in micro-processing that brought us the smartphones, laptops, and tablets that drive our mobile society. This current revolution is the result of the convergence of nano-sized chips, sensors, and transmitters which will enable the world to react to the individual, and vice-versa, with new levels of integration never seen in our lifetime. He highlighted the level of integration by examples of pills that can tell doctors when they’ve been swallowed; doors that open when the see the face of the occupant; and movie streaming services that can pick a movie based on mood of the viewer as sensed by the player. The future, truly, is now.

The second mega-trend was the blurring of lines between the auto industry and the electronics industry, highlighted in a stirring keynote by Ford CEO Mark Fields. Fields boldly stated that the automotive industry had moved from simply a product-based industry to a mobility industry, creating solutions for moving people on a global scale. From cures for traffic in Chennai and Chongqing, to mobile health solutions in Johannesburg, Fields gave a vision of a new world where auto tech utilizes data and connectivity from the Internet of Everything to create mobility solutions that mean more than just cars. In his vision, cars and technology intersect to provide answers to some of our most pressing problems. He also demonstrated how Ford is crowdsourcing these solutions and integrating them into product design for the next generation of Ford vehicles.

The third mega-trend introduced the theory of seamless movement from 2D to 3D and back again. The idea raised by HP Inc.’s new CEO Dion Wiesler was that by combining device-integrated 3D scanners, 3D printers, and new advances in material nanoscience, we can accomplish unbroken transitions between the 3D world that we inhabit and the 2D screen that we interact with. He demonstrated this concept with their new ‘Sprout’ device, which integrates 3D scanning and image manipulation with 3D printing capabilities, all in real time. It was also the first time I heard the consistent use of the word ‘voxel’ or ‘volumetric pixel’ to describe the movement from the 2D pixel on your screen into a 3D physical unit that can shape and reflect the space we inhabit.

I hope that I’ve whet your appetite to discover more about these trends and technologies, and that you’ll also notice that all of these concepts were driven by US companies. Along with EurekaPark, an area devoted just to start-ups, International CES confirmed that “American Innovation” is by no means dead, but alive, thriving, and on display for the world to see. Ma’salama from Saudi Arabia.

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Making the Most of International Trade Shows

July 25, 2014

Arun Kumar is the Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Global Markets and Director General of the U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service.

The International Trade Administration Commercial Service team may be the most connected business partners you will ever have. Our specialists are export experts, giving your business advice on potential trade partners, ways to market your company, and how to successfully export.

Now our Commercial Service team is making it even easier to succeed in exporting through an exciting video series called Export Experts. This series will provide information on trade shows, tips for exporting to rural areas, international exporting advice, and so much more.

The first video of this series is about making the most of international trade shows, which can be great opportunities to meet lots of different people in one place. They can be efficient and beneficial events for any company looking to expand to new markets.

Here are some tips about trade shows that we as commercial service officers have learned through our years of exporting assistance.

  1. Go prepared. Know your product, understand your client base, be professional. You are at a trade show to create connections with people that could become your business partners. Making a good impression is key, so know your stuff.
  2. Be interactive. One great way to stand out is to have something that attracts people to your booth. Whether it be a video or a product demonstration, keep people engaged.
  3. Make connections. You are there to meet new people, and form potential partnerships, not just to sell your product. If your company can help another company make money, you will always be in business.
  4. Follow up, and follow through. Probably the most important thing to do after a trade show is reconnect with the people you met. The only way to create these lasting business relationships is to stay connected to the people you meet.

Commercial Service officers are here to help you succeed in expanding your business. We have various tools and ideas to prepare you and maximize your time at trade shows. Contact your nearest Export Assistance Center today to find out about upcoming trade shows and how to succeed in the global marketplace.

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Six Ways to Make Your Next Trade Show Count

April 1, 2014

Ken Mouradian is the Director of the International Trade Administration’s Export Assistance Center in Orlando.

Our team can help you maximize export opportunities at trade shows.

Our team can help you maximize export opportunities at trade shows.

You’re walking the floor at a major trade show and, glancing to your right, you see two people seated deep in their booth checking e-mails on their phones. This closed off demeanor wastes two precious resources their company invested on this show, time and money.

To get the best possible return on investment from your next trade show, here are six simple suggestions that don’t cost much money and will attract traffic to just about any booth:

  1. Stand. Believe it or not, you seem more open to engagement if you’re standing, smiling, and looking at people as they pass.  By contrast, people are reluctant to distract you when you appear busy by sitting.
  2. Stage a conversation.  If there are two of you in your booth, make it appear that one of you is learning about your company from the other.  Believe it or not, people will look at something if someone else is looking; and for no better reason than that.  This works less effectively if you’re wearing clothing that brands you as working for the same company or if you’re exhibiting alone.
  3. Never leave your booth unattended.  If you need to go to lunch or the bathroom, unless you’re alone, there should always be someone in your booth.
  4. Raffles are better than hand-outs.  People will take candy or pens without actually engaging with you.  You can’t make connections and build a database if you don’t know who’s visiting your booth.  You’ll get a lot more traffic to your booth if you raffle something of value – maybe something like a tablet – than you would otherwise. You’ll also be “buying” a contact list for the cost of the item that you’re raffling.  For your raffle, it’s probably better to scan badges than to collect business cards because, to have their badges scanned, visitors to your booth will have to engage you.  Also, for a raffle to work, people need to know about it, so advertise at your booth, conduct targeted mailings/e-mailings, and advertise in the show guide and directory.
  5. Conduct targeted outreach BEFORE the show.   If you have a customer list, mail/e-mail your customers to remind them of your presence at the show and your booth number.  Similarly, you can purchase contact lists (from the U.S. Embassy, from private vendors) and send marketing collateral with your booth number to qualified potential buyers before the show.  And, don’t forget to mention your raffle!
  6. Advertise in the Export Interest Directory.  Not every show participates in the International Buyer Program; however, for those that do, you can arrange one-on-one meetings with the leaders of foreign buyer delegations.  If there’s a match to one of their delegates’ needs, they’ll bring their delegate to your booth to meet you.  Similarly, foreign buyers use the Export Interest Directory to find potential suppliers.  The easiest way to identify International Buyer Program shows is to contact your local U.S. Export Assistance Center.

Remember, trade shows are an investment of both money and time. Don’t waste either. Use these six tips to maximize your investment, and be sure to call your local Export Assistance Center to learn more about how to take advantage of every opportunity that comes your way.

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Smoothing Over Connections for Your Cosmetics Business: Cosmoprof Trade Show

February 21, 2014

Elisa Martucci and Tony Michalski are Commercial Specialists focusing on the European cosmetics market.

Are you looking to increase sales for your cosmetics business? The U.S. cosmetics industry is increasingly finding new customers overseas, achieving $10 billion in exports in 2013. That’s a 10 percent increase from 2012.

We expect companies to continue finding success overseas — especially in the European markets.

One way you can find and capitalize on opportunities in the cosmetics industry is by joining us at Cosmoprof Worldwide in Bologna, Italy this April.

Our Commercial Service specialists will be at the show to help you take full advantage – finding the best possible business opportunities and qualified potential partners. We can give you information about current market situations, issues important to your business, and key opportunities for your business around the world.

With our help, you can put every minute of time spent at the event to the best possible use.

We want to help you make the best of your business! You can register for the Cosmoprof Worldwide trade show,and be sure to let us help you get the full makeover for your business!

If you have any questions about Cosmoprof or support from the Commercial Service, please feel free to contact one of us, Elisa Martucci or Tony Michalski. Or you can always contact your nearest Export Assistance Center.

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International Buyer Program Leads the Pack at PACK EXPO Las Vegas 2013

September 13, 2013

Vidya Desai is an International Trade Specialist with the International Buyer Program. 

IBP can help you maximize export opportunities at trade shows.

IBP can help you maximize export opportunities at trade shows.

It’s a global market, and more and more small and medium-sized businesses are learning that they don’t have to be a Fortune 500 company to expand their global reach.

In the packaging and processing industries, it is especially lucrative to make international connections, and that is why the International Buyer Program (IBP) will have trade specialists from embassies around the world at the PACK EXPO Las Vegas 2013.

PACK EXPO will have more than 26,000 attendees from 127 countries, discussing the latest trends in packaging and processing in sectors from automotive to prepared foods. More than 1,700 companies will be exhibiting, making this a great opportunity for businesses in the industry to make new business connections.

IBP will help U.S. companies get the most out of this trade show, arranging meetings with pre-screened international buyers, assessing market opportunities, and helping navigate customs and trade procedures. Come meet trade specialists and participate in meetings with foreign companies at PACK EXPO in Las Vegas this September!

Part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, IBP recruits thousands of qualified foreign buyers, sales representatives, and business partners to U.S. trade shows each year, giving U.S. companies excellent opportunities to expand business globally. We recently announced we’ll be bringing international buyers to 26 shows in 2014.

Here are some of the benefits of IBP services at PACK EXPO Las Vegas:

  • Participate in face-to-face meetings with pre-screened international buyers;
  • Save time and money by meeting international partners domestically;
  • Get tips from international trade specialists on doing business abroad;
  • Learn about trends and recent developments in the packaging and processing industries.

Stop by the International Business Center at PACK EXPO located in room S-224, and follow IBP updates on Twitter at @IBPExport. We expect more than 20 delegations from around the world at PACK EXPO Las Vegas, so we will have a lot of great information to share.

For more information on PACK EXPO or other IBP events, contact Vidya Desai at Vidya.desai@trade.gov or visit http://export.gov/ibp/.

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What Happens in Vegas… Is Good for the Economy

June 11, 2013

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Calynn Jenkins is an intern in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Public Affairs. She is studying political science at American University. 

Clark County Commissioner Tom Collins, Acting Deputy Under Secretary for International Trade Ken Hyatt, and LVCVA President/CEO Rossi Ralenkotter sign a Memorandum of Agreement between ITA and LVCVA.

Clark County Commissioner Tom Collins, Acting Deputy Under Secretary for International Trade Ken Hyatt, and Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority President/CEO Rossi Ralenkotter sign a Memorandum of Agreement to support Nevada’s tourism industry.

The United States’ growth in travel and tourism exports is the result of more than just a roll of the dice. Export success in this industry requires partnerships. Partnerships among government agencies as part of President Obama’s National Travel and Tourism Strategy have helped, and government leaders took another step earlier today.

Tuesday morning, Acting Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade Kenneth Hyatt signed a Trade Promotion Partner Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority (LVCVA). This agreement between the International Trade Administration (ITA) and LVCVA creates a strategic partnership in order to strengthen Nevada’s tourism sector.

“LVCVA and ITA share a common mission to increase travel and tourism in the United States in order to boost our economy and create jobs,” said Hyatt. “I am pleased to commemorate our new partnership that will be instrumental in helping the Southern Nevada region increase the number of international visitors it attracts.”

Signing this agreement with Las Vegas makes sense; Las Vegas is a key destination for international travelers, with 39.7 million visitors in 2012. LVCVA has a goal of increasing the percentage of international visitors to Nevada from 17 to 30 percent.

“We will leverage the strength of the Las Vegas brand and the Las Vegas Convention Center’s World Trade Center designation to further position Las Vegas as a global business destination,” said LVCVA President/CEO Rossi Ralenkotter.

“Tourism drives the economic vitality of Las Vegas and supports nearly half of all the jobs in Southern Nevada,” said Clark County Commissioner Tom Collins. “The business community understands the importance of the industry.”

Not only will this agreement help the state of Nevada’s tourism sector and economy, but it supports nationwide growth in the industry. Travel and tourism supported 7.5 million jobs for American workers in 2012.

The International Trade Administration is committed to the continued growth of the U.S. travel and tourism sector. To learn more about our efforts visit the Office of Travel and Tourism Industries and for detailed information on international travel and tourism visit the 2012-2018 forecast.

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