Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category


Understanding Renewable Energy Export Markets and the Opportunity for U.S. Companies

July 21, 2015

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Ryan Mulholland is a Senior Advisor for Industry & Analysis. 

The renewable energy industry remains one of the most transformative sectors of the global economy. The International Trade Administration is committed to providing U.S. renewable energy exporters the data-driven market intelligence they need to succeed globally – whether finding your next export market or comparing opportunities to export for the first time.

Last year, we released our first-ever Top Markets Report to provide exporters analysis of future export opportunities in the renewable energy sector.  This year’s Renewable Energy Top Markets Report, now part of a larger Top Markets Series from ITA, has been updated with expanded analysis, new sections, updated case studies, and improved methodology. The result is a report that can prepare exporters to compete effectively in foreign markets by providing the analysis firms need to invest resources more strategically.

So what does the future hold for the sector? In short, we believe that the next two years will likely be as transformative as any two-year period in the history of the clean energy sector.  Technology improvements, cost declines, and the catalytic influence of new financing structures, have turned the sector into a driver of economic growth – both at home and abroad.

Here are some important findings in the report:

  • China is expected to account for more than one-third of all non-U.S. capacity installations over the next two years. Its renewable energy investment is expected to be split relatively evenly between solar, wind, and hydropower through 2020.
  • The sector’s growth is now global in nature, escaping the traditional markets of Western Europe and strongly taking root in Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Over the remainder of the decade, this trend will continue with important consequences for U.S. export competitiveness.
  • The United States does – and should continue to – capture a larger share of the import market in the Western Hemisphere. In fact, the share of the import market captured by U.S. renewable energy exporters more than doubles in the Hemisphere across technology sub sectors.
  • While opportunities can be found in most markets, the destination of U.S. renewable energy exports will continue to be highly concentrated. The top 4 export markets are expected to account for over 50 percent of all exports in the sector through 2016, while the top 12 markets should support three-quarters of all exports.

ITA’s framework for considering renewable energy export opportunities based on market size and market share was the most commented on and lasting impact of the 2014 edition of the Top Markets Report. ITA continues to encourage exporters to develop market entry and market expansion strategies based on these two variables.

  • If a market is large and U.S. exporters are likely to capture a significant market share, efforts should focus on making as many connections as possible. Exporters can feel good about their prospects, but may find other American competitors also having success in the market. Participation in trade missions, reverse trade missions, trade shows, and other “traditional” export promotion activities is encouraged in these markets.
  • In markets that are large, but in which the United States captures only a tiny fraction of the import market, exporters should consider the cause of the United States’ insufficient competitive position before pursuing opportunities. Perhaps importers are demanding products not often sold competitively by U.S. exporters, in which case a niche product might play well in the market. In markets, where U.S. market share is low because of a specific trade barrier, then exporters may want to prioritize other markets and alert U.S. Government entities, so that appropriate action can be taken.
  • In some markets, U.S. firms capture a large market share, but a relatively small market in which to do business. Exporters are encouraged to help the U.S. Government pursue market development activities in these locations, as any market development should lead to future export opportunities.
  • And finally, some markets are neither large nor support significant U.S. market share. While some companies may find niche opportunities, most exporters would be wise to consider opportunities elsewhere.

This post has only touched on some of the analysis you will find in this year’s Top Markets Report. We invite you to download the full report for our in-depth market analysis; and welcome feedback on our methodologies, viewpoints, and rankings.


Women Impacting Public Policy Partners with ITA to Help Women Entrepreneurs Explore Business Growth Opportunities

July 16, 2015

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

This is a guest blog by Barbara Kasoff, President and Co-founder of Women Impacting Public Policy.

WIPP & DOC sign partnership agreement

Kristie Arslan, Executive Director of WIPP and Assistant Secretary Marcus Jadotte signs partnership agreement.

Earlier today, Women Impacting Public Policy (WIPP) joined Assistant Secretary Jadotte at the U.S. Department of Commerce to announce a new partnership to increase awareness about exporting in the U.S. business community. Women Impacting Public Policy’s (WIPP) new strategic partnership with Commerce’s International Trade Administration (ITA) will focus on providing education and resources to help small- and medium-sized women-owned businesses succeed in the global marketplace.

Signed this morning, the Memorandum of Agreement explains that, ITA and WIPP will work together on marketing, education programs, and events leveraging our organizations’ expertise to help make U.S. businesses more export savvy. WIPP recently developed Export NOW, a step-by-step program which guides participants — current and new exporters — through the steps to enter new growing markets or to expand their export reach. We’ll also partner with ITA on our Export Now program. Joint activities may include building awareness through outreach at trade shows, collaborative press and digital communications, and online registration for resource support.

As the U.S. marketplace becomes more competitive than ever, it is crucial for businesses — particularly small- and medium-sized businesses — to engage a broader international market for success. WIPP firmly believes that the products and services provided by women-owned businesses belong not just in American hands, but should reach every consumer around the globe. As a leader in educating businesses on ways to build, develop, and expand their companies, WIPP is perfectly positioned to work in concert with ITA to aid women-owned firms in growing their footprint in the global marketplace via export opportunities.

In 2014, U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker announced the National Export Initiative/NEXT (NEI/NEXT), an expanded and revitalized U.S. export strategy. NEI/NEXT focuses on supporting U.S. businesses of all sizes and economic growth in American communities by making it easier for U.S. companies to access export resources and capitalize on growth opportunities around the world. Our partnership with ITA supports this initiative by educating U.S. women-owned businesses about the benefits of exporting and expanding their exports to additional markets. Companies will learn about public and private sector resources to assist them in going global. WIPP joins several of ITA’s Strategic Partners who have connected more than 1,500 companies to federal export assistance to broaden and deepen the U.S. exporter base.


American Competitiveness and the Global Race for Export Success

June 30, 2015

This post originally appeared on the Department of Commerce blog.

Post by Fred P Hochberg, Chairman and President, Export-Import Bank of the United States.

Photo of Fred Hochberg and two unidentified men in hard hats, safety vests and ties.

American Competitiveness and the Global Race for Export Success

This week, I had the opportunity to participate in Foreign Policy’s inaugural summit on American competitiveness, an event that brought together leaders from the worlds of business, security, and government to discuss a range of issues related to America’s capacity to thrive in today’s challenging global climate.  David Rothkopf and the Foreign Policy team put together a vibrant and informative event, which included conversations with Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker, U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman, Financial Services Roundtable CEO and former Governor Tim Pawlenty, and a host of economists, CEOs, and global policy experts.

In a speech closing the event, I took the opportunity to focus on one critical element of American competitiveness—one that is very much at risk today: the global race for export success.

EXIM Bank, which equips American businesses with the financing necessary to compete for export sales when the private sector is unable or unwilling to do so, will see its Charter lapse next Wednesday for the first time in its 81-year history.  After 16 bipartisan reauthorizations, the support of 13 consecutive U.S. presidents, and a sterling record of service to the American people—including supporting 164,000 U.S. jobs last year while generating a $675 million surplus for taxpayers—it’s hard to believe that EXIM would be allowed to lapse.  That’s particularly true when clear majorities in both the Senate and the House of Representatives have expressed support for EXIM’s reauthorization; in this day and age, that sort of consensus doesn’t happen very often.

For the last few months, I’ve been asked over and over again: what’s going to happen on July 1st if you aren’t reauthorized?  But frankly, I don’t think that’s the right question to be asking.  Because the damage caused by the debate over EXIM has already cost real Americans their jobs, and harmed long-term U.S. global leadership—and we’ll be feeling the consequences for years to come.

General Electric, one of the largest employers in America, does a lot of exporting without EXIM—but they count on the Bank to handle the deals that private financiers can’t.  A few weeks ago, we learned that GE is at risk for losing out on a major locomotive project in Angola.  This deal was expected to generate 1,800 U.S. jobs across 12 states, but because of the uncertainty surrounding EXIM, the deal is at risk—and China has agreed to step in with state-sponsored financing for their state-owned locomotive manufacturer.

That’s 1,800 American families that won’t be able to count on a dependable paycheck—1,800 jobs that should be going to folks in Pennsylvania, Texas, and Illinois that are instead going to end up in China, all because a vocal minority wants to put ideology ahead of American workers.

Of course, even though GE families are already being hurt by this, most of the pain will be reserved for small businesses that historically find it difficult to obtain export financing in the commercial sector.  On Monday, I went to Delaware to meet with one of them, a small, family-owned company called Acrow.  They manufacture modular steel bridge kits—a core product for developing countries that want to build a reliable infrastructure.

EXIM is guaranteeing a $73 million commercial loan that will empower Acrow to sell 144 bridges to Zambia.  This project will support 200 good-paying jobs at Acrow’s manufacturing facilities in Pennsylvania and Delaware, as well as at their suppliers across ten states.  It was only possible because they had access to financing that let them compete and win against their Chinese and European rivals.  Without EXIM guaranteeing the loan, no private bank was ready to finance a sale like this to Zambia.  That’s just not something that commercial banks do anymore—that’s the exact gap that EXIM was designed to fill.

Buyers in Zambia and around the world want to buy American—they want to buy the best.  But if EXIM isn’t around, they won’t always have that option.  U.S. businesses deserve better than to be cut off from critical tools that empower them to succeed in global markets.  After all, they’re already facing an alarmingly competitive world out there.

In my time as Chairman of EXIM, I’ve met a whole lot of entrepreneurs and workers across America—and I’ve never come across one who wanted a handout.  All they want is a level playing field.

When U.S. exporters go into global markets armed with financing from EXIM, they have an opportunity to compete on their merits.  When they do, they usually win.  And that means more jobs for U.S. workers, and a more competitive American economy.  We owe it to them to break down barriers to export success—not to tie their hands.


U.S. Goods Exported to Trade Agreement Partners Supported 3.2 Million Jobs in 2014

June 18, 2015

This post originally appeared on the Department of Commerce blog.

Today, Secretary Pritzker and the Commerce Department released a report showcasing that in 2014, nearly 3.2 million jobs—44 percent of all jobs supported by goods exports—were supported by the export of goods to our Free Trade Agreement (FTA) partners.

In 2014, the United States reached record levels in goods and services exports for the fifth consecutive year totaling $2.34 trillion. Since 2009, goods exports to our current FTA partners grew 64 percent versus 45 percent to the rest of the world. The United States continues to have a trade surplus in manufactured goods, $56 billion in 2014, with the countries in which we have trade agreements.

This report highlights the importance of trade agreements in supporting the U.S. economy and American jobs. Ninety-five percent of the world’s consumers live outside of our borders and the demand from overseas middle-class markets will continue to grow. The Asia-Pacific region  is expected to be home to 3.2 billion middle-class consumers by 2030. American businesses want to sell more products internationally and foreign citizens want more access to U.S. products and services.

In 2014, nearly 3.1 million jobs, or 43 percent of all jobs supported by goods exports, were the result of goods exports to the countries engaged in the current Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations. While Canada and Mexico represent the largest portion of U.S. jobs supported by exports among TPP member countries, goods exports to the five new potential FTA partners in the Asia-Pacific—Brunei, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, and Vietnam—supported nearly 460,000 jobs in 2014.

Passage of fair trade legislation, such as Trade Promotion Authority and the TPP, is a critical step toward enabling our country to negotiate modern trade agreements in the Asia-Pacific and Europe that reflect our values, open up new markets, level the playing field for our businesses and workers, and support more high-paying American jobs.


Explore Brazil’s Education and Travel & Tourism Sectors – Top Prospects for U.S Exporters

June 18, 2015

Tom Hanson is a Commercial Officer for Commercial Service Brazil, posted in São Paulo.

Commercial Service (CS) Brazil wants to spread the word that Education and Travel & Tourism rank among its highest-yielding “Best Prospect Sectors” for U.S. exporters.  Educational institutions of all sizes and specialties, as well as destinations and tour operators enjoy year-upon-year growth for these consumer-based services.

According the Institute of International Education’s 2013/14 report, Brazilians now make up 1.5 percent of the foreign student population in the United States, on par with students from Mexico and Japan (respectively, 1.7 and 2.2 percent). Presidents Obama and Rousseff place a high priority on educational exchanges in Science, Technology, Math and Engineering, and English-language teaching programs.  In 2014, CS Brazil promoted services of dozens of U.S. colleges, universities, and vocational schools, who arrive in Brazil on a regular basis to attract students and motivate local recruiters.

One of Commercial Service’s largest trade promotional programs,VisitUSA, wrapped up its three-city tour to Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, and Campinas, wherein tour operators met one-on-one with more than 70 U.S. destinations. Meanwhile, Brazilian tourists arrive in the United States in ever-growing numbers. In 2014, more than 2 million visited the United States, spending more than $12 billion collectively. Our two countries have a bilateral agreement to issue travel visas that are valid for 10 years; Consulate São Paulo alone issued more than 572,000 visas in 2014.

Brazil has a large and diversified economy that offers U.S. companies many opportunities to partner and to export their goods and services, and U.S. exports are increasing rapidly. Doing business in Brazil requires intimate knowledge of the local environment, including both the direct as well as the indirect costs of doing business in Brazil (referred to as “Custo Brasil”). Such costs may include government procedures and a complex tax structure.

The team at CS Brazil is standing by to guide U.S. exporters on uncovering new markets in these high-profile Service Exports sectors. For more information, please review CS Brazil’s Country Commercial Guide.


Brazil’s Growing Agriculture Sector is Ideal Market for U.S. Exporters

June 17, 2015

Tom Hanson is a Commercial Officer for Commercial Service Brazil, posted in São Paulo.

Commercial Service (CS) Brazil is letting the world know about our top industry prospects for U.S. exporters in Brazil. This post focuses on the Agriculture Equipment industry. Brazil leads the world in the production and/or exporting of numerous agricultural products, including soybeans, sugar, coffee, beef, chicken, orange juice, and corn.

The Brazilian growers are an ideal target market for U.S. exporters of sophisticated, high-technology self-propelled machinery; post-harvest machinery, including field refrigeration units/storage for tropical fruits; GPS and precision devices; poultry equipment; irrigation equipment; and fertilizers. Brazil is also one of the few countries still capable of increasing its planted area. Large portions of Brazil’s cerrado (savannah or prairie lands) are still available for cultivation, leaving considerable room for growth of the country’s commercial agricultural sector.

Brazil has world-class research and development labs and graduate-level studies, which signals the development of new enterprises that work to boost crop yields through increased efficiency.  The United States and Brazil have a growing bilateral trade relationship in agribusiness. Brazilian growers and land owners have come to rely upon the quality and innovation of marquee brands such as John Deere and AGCO (Massey Ferguson/Valtra/GSI Agromarau), which have been a part of many Brazilian communities for decades.

Brazil has a large and diversified economy that offers U.S. companies many opportunities to partner and to export their goods and services, and U.S. exports are increasing rapidly. Doing business in Brazil requires intimate knowledge of the local environment, including both the direct as well as the indirect costs of doing business in Brazil (referred to as “Custo Brasil”). Such costs are often related to distribution, government procedures, employee benefits, environmental laws, and a complex tax structure.

The team at CS Belo Horizonte is standing by to guide U.S. exporters on uncovering new markets in the agri-business sector. For more information about export opportunities in this sector, please review the Country Commercial Guide.


Export Success Series: Texas’ Polyguard Products Wins “E” Award for Expansion into Colombian Market

June 16, 2015

This post originally appeared on the Department of Commerce blog.

Decorative graphic representing U.S.-Colombia free trade agreement

Export Success Series: Texas’ Polyguard Products Wins “E” Award for Expansion into Colombian Market

Colombia is a major trading partner with the United States, and we have many mutually beneficial business collaborations. One American business that has profited from engaging in trade relations with Colombia is Polyguard Products, resulting in a partnership that has grown steadily within the last nine years.In 2006, the North Texas U.S. Export Assistance Center (USEAC), which is part of the Commerce Department’s International Trade Administration (ITA), assisted Polyguard Products in locating partners around the globe, and in helping with day-to-day export issues. Nathan Muncaster, the company’s global business development director, says that Polyguard has worked with Commerce “to enter many of the markets where our products fit easily… We now approach the point where the road steepens in our international journey, an incline where market access issues are becoming prevalent and important.” As Polyguard commissions the USEAC as well as the Department of Commerce for business-to-business matchmaking services, finding solutions to international export difficulties have been crucial to the company’s success. Polyguard won the 2010 President’s “E” Award for achieving outstanding exporting results, having sent products to both Colombia and Turkey. Additionally, by growing their export sales by 70 percent from 2010 to 2013, generating more than $3 million, Polyguard received the 2014 President’s “E Star” Award as well.

Polyguard Products has become a leader in remediating difficulties associated with international expansion. The company’s work is also an excellent example of how efforts to teach exporting methods to other companies can exponentially increase innovation and globalization. Companies who have similar interests in expanding their business can find information at To learn more about the President’s “E” Awards, companies can also visit The “E” Awards recognize companies for their contributions to increasing U.S. exports. In 1961, President Kennedy signed an executive order reviving the World War II “E” symbol of excellence to honor and provide recognition to America’s exporters.

Many of the “E” Awardees are able to conduct business internationally as a result of the 14 trade agreements the United States currently has in force with 20 countries. The Obama administration is working closely with Congress to pass trade promotion legislation, which outlines Congressional priorities on trade agreements, so that the deals currently being negotiated can be put in place. Trade promotion legislation is critical to the completion of new, high-standard trade agreements that will strengthen our economy, level the playing field for our businesses in markets around the world, and promote American values.


Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 538 other followers