Posts Tagged ‘aerospace’

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How to Get Paid for Your Aerospace Exports

June 17, 2014

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Fred Elliot is a Trade Specialist with the Aerospace Team at the International Trade Administration.

Photo of an airplane engine.Have you ever wondered if you should extend credit to your overseas customers in the same way you do your national customers? Or whether your banking relationships are solid enough to allow this type of credit?

Now’s the time to start getting some answers. Register now for the July 24th Trade Finance Webinar for U.S. Aerospace Exporters and gain expert insight about topics such as:

  • Dos and don’ts of export finance;
  • Methods of payment from overseas customers;
  • How the Export-Import Bank and the Small Business Administration (SBA) can help finance aerospace exports, and;
  • Ways the U.S. Department of Commerce is helping aerospace manufacturers learn about export opportunities and how to take advantage of them.

Companies in southern Ohio are welcome to participate in-person in Cincinnati, where you can meet one-on-one with finance experts from the Export-Import Bank, SBA, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration, and PNC Bank, who can answer any questions you may have.

Both webinar and in-person attendees will leave this event better prepared to succeed in global business.

You can register or find more details online, or contact Howard Thompson of the Ohio Aerospace Institute at (440)-962-3237.

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Unraveling Global Aerospace Safety Regulations

March 12, 2014

787 (450x360)

Fred Elliot is a Trade Specialist with the Aerospace Team at the International Trade Administration

Have you ever wondered what a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement is and how it can help speed the shipment of U.S. civil aircraft parts to customers overseas? What are “special requirements” other countries have on U.S. exports of civil aircraft parts and how can U.S. suppliers learn about them? What is an “export certificate of airworthiness” and when are U.S. aerospace exporters required to use it? If your response is: “The FAA requires it.”, then you share a common misconception that can be solved through lessons from the International Trade Administration.

These and other questions will be addressed during the Practical Tips for Suppliers of Civil Aircraft and Aircraft Parts to Increase Exports seminar on March 20. The program will help current and future U.S. exporters understand the requirements of the FAA and aeronautical authorities overseas in relation to U.S. civil aerospace exports. James Showman, FAA’s International Policy Branch manager, will be the featured speaker. Other speakers include ITA trade specialists who will be available to meet with individual seminar participants in person or by phone.

This event is being organized in cooperation with the Ohio Aerospace Institute, an ITA partner through the Market Development Cooperator Program. Additional details, including the program agenda and registration application, are available through the Ohio Aerospace Institute
.

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The Sky is No Limit for U.S. Aerospace Manufacturing Exports

July 3, 2013

Chandra Brown is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing in the International Trade Administration.

Chandra Brown, center, joins members of the Commercial Alternative Aviation Fuels Initiative to cut the ribbon at the Alternative Aviation Fuels Pavilion at the Paris Air Show.

Chandra Brown, center, joins members of the global aviation industry to cut the ribbon at the Alternative Aviation Fuels Pavilion at the Paris Air Show.

I recently had the great pleasure of meeting many impressive US manufacturers, as well as former astronaut Buzz Aldrin, at the 50th International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Field. Buzz is a key figure in American aerospace and was part of one of the United States’ greatest accomplishments—landing men on the moon. Meeting him was a reminder of America’s long tradition of leadership in aerospace manufacturing.

I was thrilled to see that legacy on full display at the U.S. International Pavilion in Paris. There were 264 American companies representing 34 states exhibiting in the Pavilion this year, and 75 of those companies had never been to the show before. During the week of the air show, these firms had the opportunity to meet with representatives from more than 2,000 companies from around the world, learn about new aircraft programs directly from major manufacturers, and mix with potential government customers from key aviation markets.

The International Trade Administration worked closely with Pavilion organizer Kallman Worldwide to help our exhibitors get the most out of the show. Industry experts and commercial specialists from around the world were on hand to counsel U.S. companies about their specific exporting needs. We organized a series of tours for foreign delegations interested in meeting with our firms. We worked with our colleagues at the Bureau of Industry and Security to provide the latest information on the Obama administration’s export control reform effort. We also met with representatives from both industry and government to promote foreign direct investment in the U.S. aerospace industry and the alternative jet fuels industry, and to advocate for U.S. companies competing for foreign government sales.

At the International Trade Administration, we know companies engaged in international business are stronger than those that are purely domestic. This is particularly true for the aerospace industry, which has the highest positive trade balance of any U.S. manufacturing industry.  My mission as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing is to make sure U.S. aerospace firms and other U.S. manufacturers are able to compete fairly on the global stage. ITA’s efforts at the Paris Air Show will help make that mission a success!

I hope all manufacturers will take advantage of trade missions to expand their business. You can find a list of upcoming missions here.

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Turkish Market Holds Opportunity for U.S. Businesses

December 13, 2012

Kristin Najdi is a Senior International Trade Specialist at the International Trade Administration

Last week, I had the opportunity to accompany Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade Francisco Sánchez as he led a trade mission of 18 aerospace and defense companies to Ankara and Istanbul, Turkey. The trade mission helped connect U.S. businesses with Turkish partners to identify export opportunities, but also to strengthen the commercial and strategic ties between our two countries.

Strategically positioned at the crossroads of Europe, Asia and the Middle East, Turkey is a high priority market for the United States. With a population of more than 70 million, Turkey continues to be a vital economic hub for the region—with real GDP growth estimated at 8.2 percent in 2011, making it one of the fastest growing economies in the G-20.

President Obama’s April 2009 visit to Turkey – his first overseas trip – emphasized the importance of closer commercial ties between our two countries and continues to reap economic benefits. In fact, total bilateral U.S.-Turkey merchandise trade reached nearly $20 billion last year – an all-time record – and a 34 percent increase over the previous year.

Here at the International Trade Administration (ITA), we take pride in playing a key role in making it easier for U.S. companies to do business around the world, including in Turkey.  To support this effort, Under Secretary Sanchez spoke at “The Ease of Doing Business Symposium” in Ankara, which was co-organized by ITA.  During his presentation he highlighted challenges and opportunities in the Turkish market, and proposed concrete reforms.  He also held various bilateral meetings with his counterparts in the Turkish government to discuss ways of further strengthening our bilateral commercial relations.

Another key outcome of this trip was Under Secretary Sánchez’s announcement of the new U.S. private sector members of the U.S.-Turkey Business Council.  The Council is made up of senior-level executives from the United States and Turkey and provides joint policy recommendations to both governments on ways to strengthen bilateral economic relations.

U.S. businesses on this mission—with their innovative technologies and services—are well- positioned to help support Turkey’s aerospace and defense sectors. For example, the mission included a world leader in the design, manufacture, and marketing of thermal imaging and stabilized camera systems; a company with a strong set of businesses specializing in global infrastructure and finance; and well-known commercial jet and military aerospace manufacturers.

Our mission delegation was especially enthusiastic about the Turkish market for U.S. suppliers seeking joint-venture opportunities, including expanding opportunities for small and medium-sized enterprises in the United States to support the continued modernization of the Turkish Armed Forces.

We also focused on the growing civil aviation market. Turkey, with its strategic geographic location, is located three hours by plane to 1.5 billion people and $23 trillion in GDP, and Turks have increasingly come to rely on domestic and international air service over the past years. Since 2002, there has been a 372 percent increase in domestic passenger traffic, a 77 percent increase in international passenger traffic and a 153 percent increase in total (domestic & international) passenger traffic. Overall, 329 private airline companies operate in the Turkish aerospace industry, 17 of which are Turkish. These companies are creating demand for aircraft parts as well as safety equipment, training and management – all of which are goods and services U.S. companies are well-poised to provide.

This trip was a great success in many respects.  It opened doors for new business opportunities for U.S. companies and continued Commerce’s high-level engagement with the Turkish Government to strengthen our bilateral economic and commercial relationship.

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The U.S. Aerospace Industry: Fueling Economic Growth

October 9, 2012

Francisco Sánchez is the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade.

Photo caption: Under Secretary Sanchez helps cut the ribbon to officially open the Farnborough International Air Show in the U.K. in July.

Photo caption: Under Secretary Sanchez helps cut the ribbon to officially open the Farnborough International Air Show in the U.K. in July.

We recently celebrated National Aerospace Week, which is a time to look back and appreciate all the pioneers from this industry whose vision and determination literally helped our nation reach new heights — names like Wright, Earhart, Armstrong and Jemison.

This is also a time to enjoy the contributions this great industry makes today. Every time an aircraft is built, it benefits a wide-range of stakeholders, from the businesses that make the parts, to those who assemble and fly the planes. And it’s critical that public and private representatives partner together to maintain our global leadership in this industry by helping American aerospace companies export their products to markets all over the world.

This is important work because U.S. exports are playing a central role in our economic recovery. When a sale is made abroad, it brings back revenue to hire workers here at home. Last year, U.S. exports supported nearly 10 million jobs, an increase of 1.2 million since 2009. Exports also accounted for nearly half of our increase in GDP in 2011.

The aerospace industry played a big part in this growth; it had nearly $87 billion in export sales in 2011. Notably, it had the largest positive trade balance of any U.S. manufacturing industry: $66 billion.  It’s also played an important role in our nation’s economic recovery, which includes 31 straight months of private sector growth, resulting in roughly 5.2 million jobs.

Exporting also has a significant positive impact on wages, resulting in an average increase of 18 percent across U.S. manufacturing industries.  So increasing exports translates to stronger economic security for middle class families. We want to build on that momentum by continuing to push forward with the President’s National Export Initiative, which aims to double U.S. exports by the end of 2014.

We need to do this in a number of ways. One is to get the word out to businesses – both small and large – that agencies like Commerce’s International Trade Administration are ready to help them seize these overseas opportunities.

Another way is to push for more federal investments in research and development and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education, as well as for federal policies to ensure that U.S. industry continues to have a competitive edge in aerospace and aviation.

Finally, we must continue to raise awareness abroad, and showcase how products that are “Made in America” represent quality and value. That’s why earlier this summer I attended Farnborough Airshow in the U.K. where the U.S. pavilion showcased the best of the best of America’s aerospace industry. And in August, I met with aerospace companies in Arizona and Colorado to highlight the benefits of strengthening American manufacturing and expanding U.S. exports in order to create jobs.

When new opportunities arise, we need to make sure that this industry can compete on a level playing field. We can’t afford to leave any jobs on the table.  That’s why the Administration has continuously engaged Congress over many months, on both sides of the aisle, urging support for legislation to repeal Jackson-Vanik and extend permanent normal trade relations with Russia because it will help our economy.

Already, the American aerospace industry exports hundreds of millions of dollars in aircraft and parts to Russia each year. If Congress takes action, we’ll not only see the tariff reductions that are already on-track with Russia’s accession, but we’ll also have more tools that we currently lack to address non-tariff issues like intellectual property rights and to raise concerns if there are disputes and problems in Russia’s adherence to World Trade Organization rules.

Such actions will also reward the innovation that defines American companies – and America’s aerospace industry. It is why you see international airlines around the world flying planes built here in the United States.

This industry is part of what defines America – leadership, innovation, competitiveness and strength. Let’s build on that strength – and maintain our edge in the global economy – by continuing to support the industries that employ hard working Americans.

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Transportation: Helping the Economy Move Forward

August 7, 2012

Francisco Sánchez serves as the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade. Follow him on Twitter @UnderSecSanchez.

Healthy economic development depends on a healthy transportation system.  That’s because people depend on everything from boats to trains to get to work, move their products, and help customers shop at their stores.

Across the globe, as economies push for more growth and development, there is increasing demand for transportation-related products and services, presenting an incredible opportunity for U.S. businesses.

Under Secretary Francisco Sánchez during a ceremony formalizing a partnership to promote exports between ITA and the American Association of Port Authorities.

Under Secretary Francisco Sánchez during a ceremony formalizing a partnership to promote exports between ITA and the American Association of Port Authorities.

For that exact reason, a major focus of our work at the International Trade Administration is on the transportation sector.  As you’ll see in this issue of International Trade Update, we’ve been working to help U.S. businesses in this field succeed in a number of ways.

For example, I was proud to participate in the Farnborough International Air Show, the world’s largest aerospace trade exhibition of 2012. Every other year, the global aerospace industry descends on England to exhibit their latest products and initiate partnerships. This year, $47 billion worth — that’s billion with a ‘b,’ — of orders were announced during the show.

As the largest aerospace industry in the world, this one sector contributed more than $89 billion in export sales to the U.S. economy in 2011, a 9 percent increase over the previous year. Furthermore, according to a study by the Economic and Statistics Administration of the Department of Commerce, aerospace directly supported more jobs through exports — 488,000 —than any other industry in 2011.

Other promising transportation sectors that achieved significant export shipments last year include motor vehicles ($63.4 billion), motor vehicle parts ($53.2 billion) and ships and boats ($2.4 billion).  Behind all these numbers is a significant story. Every time a business makes a sale abroad, that impacts bottom lines, jobs, communities and futures here at home.

Clearly, there are significant possibilities in this space. And the good news is that in the first five months of 2012, transportation equipment accounted for nearly $101 billion of U.S. exports, up 17.2 percent from the same months of 2011.

ITA is committed to keeping this momentum going. We continue to hold trade missions focused on transportation, including some later this year to South Africa, Zambia and Turkey.

We support the President’s recent announcement to help modernize and expand 5 major ports in the United States, thereby helping American businesses reach overseas markets more efficiently.

ITA is committed to keeping this momentum going.  We continue to raise a lot of awareness for our programs and will work hard to promote international trade, open foreign markets, and create jobs and opportunities for the American people.

Together, we can help the world meet its transportations needs far into the future, while strengthening businesses on our shores.

Related

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Global Aerospace Industry Takes Off for the World’s Largest Aerospace Trade Exhibition in 2012

July 6, 2012

Jonathan Chesebro is an Aerospace International Trade Specialist in the International Trade Administration’s (ITA) Office of Manufacturing and Services.

It’s big and it’s coming soon. The world’s largest aerospace trade exhibition in 2012, the Farnborough International Air Show, will convene in the United Kingdom from July 9-15. Every other year for one week in July, the global aerospace industry descends upon England to do business, see what big deals will be announced and which new technologies will be unveiled.

Boeing Conducts Inaugural Flight of First 787 Built in South Carolina (Photo Boeing)

Boeing Conducts Inaugural Flight of First 787 Built in South Carolina (Photo Boeing)

The 2010 Farnborough Air Show was a smashing success, with $47 billion worth of orders announced during the show, over 120,000 trade visitors and 70 delegations attending from 44 countries. This year’s show is expected to be even bigger and will feature a special ‘Jubilee Day’, which involves a number of initiatives to highlight the success of the global aerospace industry, including ‘Futures Day’, an educational program to motivate young people to follow a career in the aerospace industry.

Other expected show highlights include:

  • Boeing will show off their 787 Dreamliner in flying displays at the air show for the first time and Qatar Airways will unveil its new Boeing 787 in Qatar Airways livery;
  • Turkish Airlines is expected to announce whether it will purchase up to 15 Boeing 747-8 or Airbus A380 aircraft.

Under Secretary for International Trade, Francisco Sánchez, will be at the show to support participating U.S. companies. The Under Secretary will officially open the U.S. International Pavilion and meet with small and medium-sized U.S. aerospace companies looking to expand their export markets. Several business roundtable events are planned with established exporters and new to market companies. The Under Secretary will also meet with foreign decision makers to advocate for U.S. companies competing to sell their products or services to foreign government buyers.  The Under Secretary’s activities support the President’s National Export Initiative (NEI), the goal of which is to double U.S. exports by the end of 2014.

The U.S. aerospace industry is the largest in the world and in 2011 the industry contributed more than $85.6 billion in export sales to the U.S. economy, a nine percent increase over 2010. The industry’s positive trade balance of $47.2 billion is the largest trade surplus of any manufacturing industry and came from exporting 53 percent of all aerospace production and 77 percent of civil aircraft and component production.  According to a study by the Commerce Department’s Economic and Statistics Administration, aerospace supports more jobs through exports than any other industry: the U.S. aerospace industry directly supported 488,000 jobs in 2011.

These impressive numbers demonstrate the importance of the U.S. aerospace industry to the NEI and to the U.S. economy as a whole. For all these reasons, ITA will continue to work hard to create economic opportunity for U.S. workers and firms by promoting international trade, opening foreign markets, ensuring compliance with our trade laws and agreements, and supporting U.S. commercial interests at home and abroad.

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Trains, Planes and Automobiles…And so Much More

July 3, 2012

Tyler Voorhees is working in the Office of Public Affairs at the International Trade Administration for the summer. He is a junior at Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia.

Summer is finally here, the time when most Americans take time off from their busy work schedules and plan out a vacation or two. We either pack up the car for a family road trip, book flights to distant parts of the country or even load up the Recreational Vehicle (RV) and hit the road with no particular plans.

Shaking hands over a Harley-Davidson Softail are China’s Minister of Commerce, Chen Deming (right), and former Secretary of Commerce, current U.S. Ambassador to China, Gary Locke (center) (Photo Commerce)

Shaking hands over a Harley-Davidson Softail are China’s Minister of Commerce, Chen Deming (right), and former Secretary of Commerce, current U.S. Ambassador to China, Gary Locke (center) (Photo Commerce)

Given how much Americans love to travel, it is no wonder that we’ve developed one of the most sophisticated and competitive transportation industries, and by that we don’t just mean the iconic Detroit 3 or aerospace giant Boeing. America still manufactures a wide array of products that we lump together as “transportation.” This includes everything from recreational boats like kayaks, paddle boats and motorboats to the new Boeing 787 Dreamliner, which is truly a global effort with components manufactured all over the world.

Not only is domestic demand for these goods strong, there is also strong demand for our transportation goods abroad. Did you know that in 2011 the U.S. aerospace industry alone contributed more than $87 billion to U.S. exports sales? U.S. aerospace exports are expected to grow thanks to the largest aerospace show in 2012, the Farnborough Airshow in England. Boeing has decided to demonstrate its new 787 Dreamliner for foreign buyers and expects strong sales this year as airlines prepare to increase their fleet size in preparation for the air travel boom sparked by an expected increase in international travel and tourism.

Also, what may be even more surprising is that China is expected to be a huge market for many recreational transportation goods, including pleasure boats, motorcycles and RVs. Harley-Davidson, for example, already has eight full-service dealerships in China, and it plans to open even more in the coming years.  Also, the RV market in China is about to take off, according to industry experts.  ‘RVs have a long and glorious history in the West,’ says one Chinese entrepreneur in Beijing.  ‘Chinese are the same; we love the outdoors.  So we’re learning the American and Western RV culture.’

The transportation industry is also at the forefront of development in the sustainable economy. Many people don’t know that several U.S. automotive plants produce no waste, remanufacturing drastically reduces the material, energy, and water usage of the U.S. service parts industry, and that more than 95 percent of U.S. automobiles are recycled. Combined with the ongoing investments in vehicle efficiency technologies such as advanced combustion engines, hybrid and electric vehicles, the U.S. automotive industry is the very epitome of the mantra “Reduce, Reuse, Recycle.”

For all of the reasons above, we’ve decided to spend the month of July highlighting the successes the transportation industry has enjoyed abroad and all that we do here at the International Trade Administration (ITA) to help American businesses abroad.

We will be highlighting innovative work that shows the unconventional ways that businesses can find customers abroad, grow their businesses and create good-paying jobs here in America during the process. Make sure to check our blog for new articles and follow us on Twitter at @TradeGov for interesting facts as the month goes on.

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Creating Jobs: “Plane” and Simple

February 7, 2012

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Kim Wells is a senior international trade specialist in the Office of Aerospace, with 19 years’ experience supporting aerospace exports.

Most people think of planes as a way of connecting people with destinations.  In the International Trade Administration (ITA), we know that just one plane connects thousands of workers here at home.

As with most exports of large, high-tech products, the export of one aircraft (or ship, or large piece of machinery) is the result of a huge supply chain that touches people and communities across the United States.

For example, in November 2011, Emirates Airlines signed an agreement to purchase 50 new Boeing 777-300ER aircraft with options for 20 more, totaling $26 billion at list prices.  Each 777 will be equipped with two American-made GE90 engines. Though the names on the plane may be “Boeing” and “GE”, the truth is that each aircraft is a finely integrated system of nearly four million parts from more than 11,000 suppliers specializing in everything from lighting to advanced avionics and seatback trays to landing gear. As a result, this single sale will support over 100,000 U.S. jobs in more than a dozen states.

These jobs are the kind of jobs the United States is seeking—high technology, high wage, and high skilled.  And with each of these jobs, thousands of other indirect jobs are created that support the work and lives of these employees.  In fact, the aerospace and defense industry employed over 818,000 people in the United States in 2009 and supported an additional 1.8 million U.S. jobs in related fields.

The U.S. aerospace industry has the highest trade surplus of any U.S. manufacturing industry and supports more jobs through exports than any other manufacturing industry.  At ITA, we know that U.S. firms—whether they make large planes or business jets, helicopters or aircraft engines—can produce products at home that will beat the competition overseas as long as they compete on a level playing field.  That’s why aerospace is an important export industry that will help achieve the goals of President Obama’s National Export InitiativeITA’s Aerospace Team is working hard to identify and create new export opportunities, break down barriers in foreign markets and ensure that level playing field for our manufacturers in order to create and secure aerospace industry jobs here in the United States.

So, is selling an airplane overseas good for the country and for American jobs?

Yes–“plane” and simple.

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Featured Trade Event May 6–9, 2012

December 7, 2011

U.S. Aerospace Supplier Trade Mission to Canada

Montreal, Canada

Canadian flight directions display (photo courtesy istock/melissa mercier)

Canadian flight directions display (photo courtesy istock/melissa mercier)

As the world’s fifth largest aerospace market and its third largest civil aircraft market, Canada provides great opportunities for U.S. suppliers of aircraft parts, components and systems. Canada is a leading producer of regional aircraft, commercial helicopters, turbine engines, flight simulators, and a wide range of aircraft systems and equipment. Montreal is one of the world’s three largest aerospace hubs, along with Toulouse, France, and Seattle, Washington. It is also one of the few places in the world where an entire aircraft can be assembled within a 30-mile radius.

Participants in this trade mission will have a unique opportunity to meet prospective business partners in Canada through meetings with prescreened aerospace procurement and engineering representatives, networking events with Canadian aerospace industry and government representatives, and seminars and industry briefings conducted by industry experts on opportunities in Canada’s aerospace market. There will also be special site visits to key Canadian aerospace companies.

The cost to participate in the trade mission ranges from $2,200 to $2,800 per company for two representatives, depending on firm size. There is a $250 fee per additional company participant. The fee covers all in-country travel and one-on-one meetings, but mission participants will be responsible for travel to and from Montreal, lodging, most meals, and incidentals. Applications must be received by February 1, 2012. Companies are encouraged to apply early as space is limited. For more information about the trade mission, visit its Web site or contact Gina Rebelo Bento of the USFCS, tel.: (514) 908-3660; e-mail: gina.bento@trade.gov.

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