Posts Tagged ‘Asia’

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Discover What’s Next for Your Business at the Discover Forum

August 22, 2013

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Shirreef Loza and Frances Selema are Senior International Trade Specialists with the International Trade Administration’s Export Assistance Center in Raleigh, NC.

The Discover Forum will be held in Raleigh, NC, from Sept. 16-18.

There are plenty of questions for a small business looking to start exporting. What markets are best suited for your company’s products? How can you compete with larger companies? How can you get paid for your products? What kind of research do you need to do to begin exporting?

Luckily, you can get answers to all these questions and more at the 2013 Discover Global Forum in Raleigh, NC, Sept. 16-18.

This two-day summit will feature some of the world’s most knowledgeable people when it comes to exporting. Trade specialists from around the globe will be on hand to share inside tips about doing business in established and emerging markets, from Africa to Asia and the Middle East to South America.

Update: Check out a video about the Discover Forum 2013.

These specialists work every day in some of the world’s fastest growing economies – markets with consumers who are actively seeking the made-in-USA label. They know the best ways to bring your products to customers around the world.

The Discover Forum is the perfect opportunity for any U.S. business looking to begin exporting or to expand exports.

There’s no question that exporting is a great way to grow just about any business. It can protect your company from fluctuations in a single regional or national economy. It can expand your customer base, increasing sales and profits. It can also help create jobs in your town and boost the local economy.

We’ve shared several stories recently about just a fraction of the companies who have experienced new levels of success because of exporting.

Your company could be the next success story.

We at the International Trade Administration are proud to partner with the North Carolina District Export Council and other organizations to host the Discover Forum because exports are crucial to supporting the American economic recovery. Exports support millions of jobs, and that leads to greater prosperity here at home.

If your business is ready to start or increase exporting, register now for the Discover Forum. You can also follow the Forum on Twitter or contact us for more information.

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ITA Leads Largest Ever Civil Nuclear Trade Policy Mission to Vietnam and China

June 13, 2013

Francisco J. Sánchez is the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade.

Under Secretary of International Trade Francisco Sánchez and U.S. delegation members meet with Vietnamese Minister of Science and Technology Nguyễn Quân and others in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Under Secretary of International Trade Francisco Sánchez and U.S. delegation members meet with Vietnamese Minister of Science and Technology
Nguyễn Quân in Hanoi, Vietnam.

This May, I was able to lead the largest ever U.S. Civil Nuclear Energy Trade Policy Mission to Hanoi, Vietnam, and Beijing and Ningbo, China. This mission enabled us to address important policy issues and highlight how U.S. civil nuclear technologies and services can help Vietnam and China meet their civil nuclear energy goals.

The U.S. government delegation included representatives from the White House, Department of Energy, U.S. Export-Import Bank, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and of course the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration. The industry delegation included 11 American companies in Vietnam and 15 in China.

Vietnam and China offer abundant opportunities to U.S. civil nuclear companies:

  • Vietnam is steadily developing its nuclear power program and its civil nuclear market is estimated to be worth $10 billion and expected to grow to $50 billion by 2030;
  • China is the world’s fastest growing civil nuclear market. 29 of the 65 reactors under construction globally are in China and the country’s nuclear industry is expected to grow to nearly $300 billion by 2020.

In Vietnam, our delegation met with government officials and also participated in a Best Practices workshop attended by 50 representatives from Vietnamese ministries, state-owned utilities, and regulatory agencies. Delegates shared their expertise on a variety of topics including safety improvements post-Fukushima, and how nuclear regulators and industry can cooperate to enhance nuclear safety.

In China, we met with eight ministries and companies to discuss policy issues such as liability, local content, and intellectual property rights. The mission concluded with a visit to China’s Sanmen nuclear power plant site, where the world’s first AP1000 reactor – designed by U.S. company Westinghouse – is being built.

Our trade mission also lined-up with other important events recognizing the value of our economic relationship with Asia.

This week, the U.S.-ASEAN Business Council is holding a series of meetings with U.S. businesses. I was also able to speak about the importance of Asia at the Hong Kong Trade Development Council’s Think Asia Think Hong Kong symposium in New York.

I am proud to contribute to our important trade relationship, and to have led such a distinguished delegation to these key civil nuclear export markets. This is another example of our efforts to help U.S. exporters find new opportunities to sell their goods and services and support American jobs.

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Trade Winds Asia 2013

May 10, 2013

Francisco J. Sánchez is the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade.

Logo for Trade Winds Asia, a business development conference in Southwest Asia May 9 through 17, 2013.

Trade Winds missions have led to nearly $110 million in reported export successes.

One thing we understand in international trade is the importance of partnerships.

Asia has been a great partner to American business and offers immense opportunities for companies looking to expand into new markets. As the 2013 Trade Winds Asia mission goes on through May 19, U.S. businesses will learn about opportunities in a wide range of industry sectors across many regions in Asia.

It’s a great event for World Trade Month as we continue to promote U.S. goods and services around the world.

The mission visits five major cities in the Asian market: Hong Kong, Manila, Seoul, Taipei, and Tokyo. These cities represent regions with expanding global sales potential for U.S. business, and play a major part in our recent export success.

  • The United States exported more than $387 billion of goods to Asia in 2012;
  • The top three export categories were computer and electronic products, chemicals, and transportation equipment;
  • U.S. exports to Hong Kong have more than doubled since 2005;
  • Exports to Japan have increased every year since 2009; and
  • U.S. exports to countries with which we have trade agreements, including Korea, increased by 5.8 percent in 2012.

These figures show the great partnership we have with Asia, and the potential that remains for future business. The figures also represent jobs back here at home; $387 billion in merchandise exports to Asia supports nearly two million American jobs.

Trade Winds missions around the world contribute to export success. Companies who report back to us on their successes tell us they’ve achieved nearly $110 million in exports as a result of participating in Trade Winds missions.

I’m honored to lead this mission and I’m proud of the work my colleagues at the International Trade Administration have put in to making the mission as successful as possible. I am proud to be working with the business leaders participating in Trade Winds Asia – and I hope we can help many more on one of our upcoming missions.

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Exporting Entertainment to China and Asia-Pacific: It’s a Wrap!

April 25, 2013

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Andrea DaSilva is the Senior Media & Entertainment Analyst for the International Trade Administration.

The Hong Kong Trade Filmart attendees gather around the U.S.A. pavilion.Development Council recently hosted Filmart, the third largest film industry trade show after Cannes and American Film Market in Santa Monica, Cali.

U.S. exhibitors secured film licensing and distribution deals to the tune of $8 million and counting, supporting American exports and bringing some of our most creative exports to new audiences.

U.S. Secured 175 Licensing Deals Worth $8 Million

The International Trade Administration and the Independent Film and Television Alliance co-sponsored the American Pavilion as part of the Market Development Cooperator Program, with cooperation from the Pacific Bridge Initiative.

Buyers from around the region came to purchase U.S. filmed entertainment, which is nothing new; American movies continue to be in high demand globally. China’s State Administration of Radio, Film, and Television reports that seven of the top ten films in China last year were American.

Hong Kong Filmart provides an ideal gateway to reach China and Southeast Asia, especially for small and independent businesses based in the United States who can’t afford to hang their shingle in China.

China’s Film Industry – Expanding Rapidly

China’s entertainment market is growing, and with it demand for new content. Hollywood studios and small producers alike are increasingly partnering with Chinese industry or governmental bodies to bring U.S. films to the Chinese market.

PThe U.S.A. pavilion at Filmart 2013 in Hong Kong.roduction houses like Dreamworks, Marvel Comics, Warner Brothers, Relativity Media, and Legendary Pictures, to mention a few, all have joint projects with Chinese partners and their presence in China is contributing to the development of the country’s film and animation industries, while also increasing U.S. exports. It’s a dramatic shift from past decades when the doors were closed for business; the U.S. industry has a solid foot in the door today.

China’s Box Office – Exploding

China boasts the second-largest box office revenues worldwide at $2.7 billion in 2012, a 30.2 percent increase over 2011. Foreign films accounted for 52.4 percent of box office ticket sales in the country last year, but constituted only about a quarter of the 303 movies screened in Chinese theaters.

These exports aren’t just good for the film industry, they help support one of our most creative industries and help support American jobs.

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Asian-Pacific FDI Contributions to U.S. Economy

September 17, 2009

Aaron Brickman has been with the International Trade Administration for over seven years.  He currently serves as the Director of Invest in America; and is responsible for management and coordination of foreign direct investment promotion and related activities of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

As the director of Invest in America, the primary U.S. government mechanism to manage foreign direct investment promotion on the federal level, I’m currently conducting foreign direct investment (FDI) seminars and presentations in Taipei and India.  The long flight from Taiwan to India is a great opportunity to provide an update on the growth of FDI from Asia to the United States. 

Invest in America (IIA) recently published a paper detailing the important role of Asian-Pacific direct investment to the U.S. economy.  The report, “Asian-Pacific Foreign Direct Investment in the United States,” focuses on 10 countries and geographic areas that have a large FDI presence in the United States: Australia, China, Hong Kong, India, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan.

Did you know that Asian–Pacific companies currently employ more than 788,000 U.S. workers? That number is equal to the combined working population of Boston and San Francisco. The jobs are high paying, offering on average $68,000 in annual compensation. These firms spend $4.6 billion annually on research and development in the United States and generate $61 billion in U.S. exports. Our report predicts that Asian–Pacific FDI will increase in the United States during the next 10 years, with China and India likely to be significant contributors to that trend.

Companies invest in America because we represent the largest fully-developed single country economy in the world and because our labor pool is one of the best educated, most productive, and most innovative in the world.  We are a global leader in science and technology and a center for innovation.  We reward creativity and we safeguard it by a strong intellectual property rights protection and enforcement regime.

To learn more about Invest in America, global FDI trends and resources or to obtain a copy of the report, visit the office’s Web site at www.investamerica.gov.

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