Posts Tagged ‘aviation’

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How to Get Paid for Your Aerospace Exports

June 17, 2014

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Fred Elliot is a Trade Specialist with the Aerospace Team at the International Trade Administration.

Photo of an airplane engine.Have you ever wondered if you should extend credit to your overseas customers in the same way you do your national customers? Or whether your banking relationships are solid enough to allow this type of credit?

Now’s the time to start getting some answers. Register now for the July 24th Trade Finance Webinar for U.S. Aerospace Exporters and gain expert insight about topics such as:

  • Dos and don’ts of export finance;
  • Methods of payment from overseas customers;
  • How the Export-Import Bank and the Small Business Administration (SBA) can help finance aerospace exports, and;
  • Ways the U.S. Department of Commerce is helping aerospace manufacturers learn about export opportunities and how to take advantage of them.

Companies in southern Ohio are welcome to participate in-person in Cincinnati, where you can meet one-on-one with finance experts from the Export-Import Bank, SBA, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration, and PNC Bank, who can answer any questions you may have.

Both webinar and in-person attendees will leave this event better prepared to succeed in global business.

You can register or find more details online, or contact Howard Thompson of the Ohio Aerospace Institute at (440)-962-3237.

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Unraveling Global Aerospace Safety Regulations

March 12, 2014

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Fred Elliot is a Trade Specialist with the Aerospace Team at the International Trade Administration

Have you ever wondered what a Bilateral Aviation Safety Agreement is and how it can help speed the shipment of U.S. civil aircraft parts to customers overseas? What are “special requirements” other countries have on U.S. exports of civil aircraft parts and how can U.S. suppliers learn about them? What is an “export certificate of airworthiness” and when are U.S. aerospace exporters required to use it? If your response is: “The FAA requires it.”, then you share a common misconception that can be solved through lessons from the International Trade Administration.

These and other questions will be addressed during the Practical Tips for Suppliers of Civil Aircraft and Aircraft Parts to Increase Exports seminar on March 20. The program will help current and future U.S. exporters understand the requirements of the FAA and aeronautical authorities overseas in relation to U.S. civil aerospace exports. James Showman, FAA’s International Policy Branch manager, will be the featured speaker. Other speakers include ITA trade specialists who will be available to meet with individual seminar participants in person or by phone.

This event is being organized in cooperation with the Ohio Aerospace Institute, an ITA partner through the Market Development Cooperator Program. Additional details, including the program agenda and registration application, are available through the Ohio Aerospace Institute
.

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Come Help Brazil Fly!

December 23, 2013

Alexis Haakensen is an Aerospace Industry Specialist in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Transportation and Machinery.

Brazil is the world’s fourth largest domestic aviation market and has been a top 10 market for U.S. aerospace exports since 2004. Home to 3,500+ airports, more than 13,000 general aviation aircraft, and the biggest airline in Latin America, Brazil has opportunities for companies across the aviation industry.

To introduce U.S. firms to this readily expanding market, the International Trade Administration (ITA) at the Department of Commerce is organizing a trade mission to Brazil from May 12-16, 2014. The mission is designed for U.S. aviation and aerospace manufacturers and service providers, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises interested in long-term business opportunities in Brazil, as well as the trade associations/organizations that represent them.

Participants will have two days of one-on-one business meetings in São Paulo with the option of adding other cities if desired. More information can be found on the web or by contacting:

This is the latest in a series of aviation programs with Brazil supported by ITA and the U.S. government. In 2012, the two governments launched the U.S-Brazil Aviation Partnership to foster closer ties in aviation between our two countries. During the past two years, government agencies from both sides have sponsored workshops, conferences, and industry matchmaking events to create new opportunities for industry. ITA has supported this initiative by providing webinars and supporting supply chain events and by advancing aviation policy issues under the joint recommendation of the U.S.-Brazil CEO Forum.

We hope to see many U.S. aviation businesses taking advantage of this mission and the many opportunities available in Brazil.

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NextGen Solutions Vendors Guide Brings State-of-the-Art Air Traffic Management to Global Clients

September 11, 2013

Jonathan Alvear, an international trade specialist with the Office of Transportation and Machinery in the International Trade Administration, is the author of The NextGen Solutions Vendors Guide.

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration has launched a new tool connecting U.S. providers of air traffic management technologies and related services to potential clients across the globe.

The NextGen Solutions Vendors Guide directs users to U.S. manufacturers of Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) technologies that meet the requirements laid out by the United Nations’ International Aviation Organization (ICAO) as well as to related knowledge and service providers.

The Guide:

  • is a web-based resource that addresses current and expected needs regarding air traffic management, airspace capacity, flight path efficiency, enhanced communications and data exchanges, and operational improvements to the airport environment
  • is based primarily on the four Aviation System Block Upgrade (ASBU) performance improvement areas of airport operations, globally interoperable systems and data, optimum capacity and flexible flights, and efficient flight paths
  • also features the knowledge and service providers who can help implement these NextGen solutions and/or provide services and expertise that complement these upgrades.

Because the NextGen Solutions Vendors Guide is mapped to the ASBU requirements, users will have access to a comprehensive listing of the upgrades that ICAO will be formally endorsing this fall matched with links to the websites of the U.S. companies that can help customers fulfill those requirements.

Partnership and Cooperation

The NextGen Solutions Vendors Guide was created in cooperation with Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) and companies such as:

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Turkish Market Holds Opportunity for U.S. Businesses

December 13, 2012

Kristin Najdi is a Senior International Trade Specialist at the International Trade Administration

Last week, I had the opportunity to accompany Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade Francisco Sánchez as he led a trade mission of 18 aerospace and defense companies to Ankara and Istanbul, Turkey. The trade mission helped connect U.S. businesses with Turkish partners to identify export opportunities, but also to strengthen the commercial and strategic ties between our two countries.

Strategically positioned at the crossroads of Europe, Asia and the Middle East, Turkey is a high priority market for the United States. With a population of more than 70 million, Turkey continues to be a vital economic hub for the region—with real GDP growth estimated at 8.2 percent in 2011, making it one of the fastest growing economies in the G-20.

President Obama’s April 2009 visit to Turkey – his first overseas trip – emphasized the importance of closer commercial ties between our two countries and continues to reap economic benefits. In fact, total bilateral U.S.-Turkey merchandise trade reached nearly $20 billion last year – an all-time record – and a 34 percent increase over the previous year.

Here at the International Trade Administration (ITA), we take pride in playing a key role in making it easier for U.S. companies to do business around the world, including in Turkey.  To support this effort, Under Secretary Sanchez spoke at “The Ease of Doing Business Symposium” in Ankara, which was co-organized by ITA.  During his presentation he highlighted challenges and opportunities in the Turkish market, and proposed concrete reforms.  He also held various bilateral meetings with his counterparts in the Turkish government to discuss ways of further strengthening our bilateral commercial relations.

Another key outcome of this trip was Under Secretary Sánchez’s announcement of the new U.S. private sector members of the U.S.-Turkey Business Council.  The Council is made up of senior-level executives from the United States and Turkey and provides joint policy recommendations to both governments on ways to strengthen bilateral economic relations.

U.S. businesses on this mission—with their innovative technologies and services—are well- positioned to help support Turkey’s aerospace and defense sectors. For example, the mission included a world leader in the design, manufacture, and marketing of thermal imaging and stabilized camera systems; a company with a strong set of businesses specializing in global infrastructure and finance; and well-known commercial jet and military aerospace manufacturers.

Our mission delegation was especially enthusiastic about the Turkish market for U.S. suppliers seeking joint-venture opportunities, including expanding opportunities for small and medium-sized enterprises in the United States to support the continued modernization of the Turkish Armed Forces.

We also focused on the growing civil aviation market. Turkey, with its strategic geographic location, is located three hours by plane to 1.5 billion people and $23 trillion in GDP, and Turks have increasingly come to rely on domestic and international air service over the past years. Since 2002, there has been a 372 percent increase in domestic passenger traffic, a 77 percent increase in international passenger traffic and a 153 percent increase in total (domestic & international) passenger traffic. Overall, 329 private airline companies operate in the Turkish aerospace industry, 17 of which are Turkish. These companies are creating demand for aircraft parts as well as safety equipment, training and management – all of which are goods and services U.S. companies are well-poised to provide.

This trip was a great success in many respects.  It opened doors for new business opportunities for U.S. companies and continued Commerce’s high-level engagement with the Turkish Government to strengthen our bilateral economic and commercial relationship.

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