Posts Tagged ‘Brazil’

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Brazil and U.S. Share More Than Just Love of Soccer

June 19, 2014

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Jonathan Gartenberg is an Intern in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Trade and Economic Analysis

Fans from many countries watch a sporting event.

World Cup fever plays a part in the expanding U.S.-Brazil commercial relationship.

The FIFA World Cup is underway and all over the world, excitement grows as fans cheer on their national teams.

Americans are no exception.

In fact the Brazilian Federal Government reported that more than 150,000 tickets were assigned to the United States – more than any other country outside Brazil.

By cheering on the U.S. team, fans are not only supporting players but contributing to the growing commercial relationship between Brazil and the United States.

Below are some highlights from Brazil’s economic and trade profile:

  • Like the United States, Brazil is mainly a service economy. In 2012, services comprised 68.5 percent of Brazil’s economy, compared to 78.6 percent of the U.S. economy in 2011.
  • Brazil is a net exporter to the world and had a 2013 trade balance of $2.5 billion. In the same year, Brazil’s exports totaled $242 billion.
  • As recipient of $44.1 billion of U.S. exports in 2013, Brazil earns a spot in the Top 10 U.S. Export Markets. Our top five exports to Brazil, are chemicals, transportation equipment, computer and electronic products, machinery (except electrical), and petroleum and coal products.
  • U.S. and Brazil mutual foreign direct investment totals more than $80 billion dollars, supporting thousands of jobs in both countries.

Even when world sporting events aren’t going on, the Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration (ITA), and other government partners work hard to further develop the U.S.-Brazil commercial relationship. ITA maintains five offices around the country, and our commercial specialists connect U.S. companies to qualified partners and promising business opportunities.

You can learn more about the work ITA is doing in Brazil at http://www.export.gov/brazil, or follow our Brazil team on Twitter at @Export2Brazil.

Stay tuned for more economic profiles on the countries competing in the World Cup!

 

*Except where noted, all figures are from Trade Policy Information System.

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Come Help Brazil Fly!

December 23, 2013

Alexis Haakensen is an Aerospace Industry Specialist in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Transportation and Machinery.

Brazil is the world’s fourth largest domestic aviation market and has been a top 10 market for U.S. aerospace exports since 2004. Home to 3,500+ airports, more than 13,000 general aviation aircraft, and the biggest airline in Latin America, Brazil has opportunities for companies across the aviation industry.

To introduce U.S. firms to this readily expanding market, the International Trade Administration (ITA) at the Department of Commerce is organizing a trade mission to Brazil from May 12-16, 2014. The mission is designed for U.S. aviation and aerospace manufacturers and service providers, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises interested in long-term business opportunities in Brazil, as well as the trade associations/organizations that represent them.

Participants will have two days of one-on-one business meetings in São Paulo with the option of adding other cities if desired. More information can be found on the web or by contacting:

This is the latest in a series of aviation programs with Brazil supported by ITA and the U.S. government. In 2012, the two governments launched the U.S-Brazil Aviation Partnership to foster closer ties in aviation between our two countries. During the past two years, government agencies from both sides have sponsored workshops, conferences, and industry matchmaking events to create new opportunities for industry. ITA has supported this initiative by providing webinars and supporting supply chain events and by advancing aviation policy issues under the joint recommendation of the U.S.-Brazil CEO Forum.

We hope to see many U.S. aviation businesses taking advantage of this mission and the many opportunities available in Brazil.

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N.C. Business Scores a Win: Receives FIFA Product License

September 10, 2013

Phillip Goldstein recently completed an internship in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Public Affairs. He is a senior at Middlebury College, majoring in International Politics & Economics

Once every four years, the world gets a taste of world class soccer with the FIFA World Cup. For Greensboro, NC-based University Print & Graphics, the 2014 World Cup experience will include more than just watching the games.

The International Federation of Association Football, popularly known by the French acronym FIFA, recently notified University Print & Graphics of approval for a product license. The company will be able to sell officially licensed hair bows at the World Cup in Brazil.

Chief Operating Officer and Co-Owner Michael Brunson came up with the idea during a trip to South Africa to watch the 2010 World Cup. It took the firm two years to apply for and receive the license from FIFA.

It’s a rigorous process to apply for such a license. Luckily, the company wasn’t alone – Debbie Strader and the International Trade Administration’s Export Assistance Center in Greensboro helped the business navigate through the license application.

They worked together to make sure all parts of the export process had been taken care of, including finalizing product requirements, negotiating freight shipment rates, and securing legal representation. Strader also worked closely with the ITA team in Brazil, giving the company even more insight about doing business in the country.

This license means a lot for University Print & Graphics and for Greensboro. The company expects to hire as many as 25 additional employees under a new division that will handle many aspects of the World Cup campaign.

It’s a powerful team when it comes to exports – quality American products and ITA’s offices in the United States and around the world. We’d like to team up with your company too. If we can help your business increase exports, visit your local U.S. Export Assistance Center.

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Partnership Helps U.S. Businesses Find Opportunities in Brazil

September 3, 2013

Kit Rudd is the Senior International Trade Specialist responsible for Construction Machinery in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Transportation and Machinery.

Achilles Arbex is the general manager of the Association for Manufacturing Technology's Sao Paulo Technology Center.

Achilles Arbex

Brazil is becoming an increasingly important partner for the United States. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, and Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade Francisco Sánchez all visited Brazil in August to discuss growing U.S.-Brazil ties in trade and education.

For U.S. exporters, Brazil’s machinery manufacturing sector represents an attractive opportunity. Taking advantage of that opportunity, however, requires familiarity with the country’s often challenging customs and tariff systems, local content requirements, and legal procedures for establishing a business.

That’s where Achilles Arbex can help. Arbex is the General Manager of the Association for Manufacturing Technology’s (AMT) Sao Paulo Technology Center. The Technology Center is the focal point of a $290,000 Market Development Cooperator Program (MDCP) award the International Trade Administration (ITA) awarded to AMT.

The award is helping AMT represent and promote the interests of U.S.-based manufacturing technology businesses. AMT supports manufacturers that design, build, sell, and service the continuously evolving technology that lies at the heart of manufacturing.

Our team recently spent five days with Arbex and AMT executives at the FEIMAFE Machine Tools Trade Exposition in Sao Paulo, talking to U.S. exhibitors about how AMT’s Technology Center can help U.S. companies take advantage of opportunities in Brazil.

To help its member companies access emerging global markets more easily, AMT has opened technology centers in Shanghai; Chennai, India; Monterey, Mexico and now Sao Paulo.

AMT’s technology centers provide a variety of services to AMT members, including:

  • Researching and arranging meetings with potential customers
  • Providing comprehensive market and competitive analysis
  • Translation oversight on promotional pieces and technical documents
  • Trade show assistance
  • Negotiation practices

The MDCP award is a competitive program that provides funds to organizations aiming to increase U.S. exports. For every dollar given to an industry by ITA, the industry group must provide two of its own. As part of the award, ITA will work with awardees to help accomplish their mission.

The Department of Commerce recently announced seven recipients of the 2013 MDCP awards. For more information about the awards, including how to apply for future consideration, visit: www.trade.gov/mdcp.

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Brazil is an Olympic-Sized Market for Education Services

September 11, 2012

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Braeden Young is an International Trade Specialist and Brazil Desk Officer within the International Trade Administration.

Brazil, which became the world’s sixth-largest economy last year, is bustling with activity. As Brazil ramps up preparations for hosting the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Olympic Games, opportunity abounds for U.S. companies to support infrastructure development at sports venues, surrounding communities and commercial centers, and transportation hubs.

The recent discovery of new oil reserves off Brazil’s coast presents new opportunities in the oil and gas sector. U.S. firms have specialized expertise in deep water drilling and related services and are well-positioned to partner with Brazilian companies to help Brazil reach its objectives.

(L to R) U.S. Embassador to Brazil, Thomas A. Shannon, Jr., Rita Moriconi, Regional EducationUSA Director for Southern Cone Countries, Lucia Maria Martins do Santos, Executive Director of Casa Thomas Jefferson, Francisco J. Sanchez, Under Secretary for International Trade open the EducationUSA trade fair in Brasilia, Brazil (Photo CJT Online)

(L to R) U.S. Embassador to Brazil, Thomas A. Shannon, Jr., Rita Moriconi, Regional EducationUSA Director for Southern Cone Countries, Lucia Maria Martins do Santos, Executive Director of Casa Thomas Jefferson, Francisco J. Sanchez, Under Secretary for International Trade open the EducationUSA trade fair in Brasilia, Brazil (Photo CJT Online)

However, Brazil’s rise is marked not only by towering cranes and the roar of jackhammers, but also by smiling students and the scribbling of pencil on paper. Education is vital to Brazil’s long-term development and the market for education services here has never been better.

Brazil’s economy grew 23 percent over the last five years, to nearly $2.5 trillion in 2011. Economic growth and industrial development has created demand for a better trained, more sophisticated workforce; Brazil hopes to expand educational opportunities for students in order to meet employer needs in commerce, high technology, and engineering. U.S. colleges and universities are ready to help Brazil meet these demands.

Brazil’s population of nearly 200 million is easily the largest in Latin America. In recent years, tens of millions of Brazilians of have emerged out of poverty into Brazil’s middle class, which now represents over half of Brazil’s population. Now, more than ever, Brazilian students have the interest and means to study overseas, and they want to come to the United States!

The United States is a top destination for Brazilian students studying abroad. Since 2006, the United States has seen an increase in the number of Brazilian students. Nearly 9,000 Brazilians studied in the United States last year, a 25 percent increase from 2006, placing Brazil in 14th place among country of origin of international students in the United States. Tuition and living expenses for international students brought in nearly $21 billion to the U.S. economy last year. Brazilian students accounted for $257 million. New partnerships between our two countries will boost the number of Brazilian students on campuses across the United States.

Brazil’s new Science Without Borders program illustrates the commitment of the Brazilian government to higher education. This innovative initiative aims send 101,000 Brazilian students and scholars in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields to study and conduct research abroad over the next four years. The United States is and will continue to be an important destination for these anxious young learners.

Last week, Under Secretary for International Trade Francisco Sánchez led representatives from 66 U.S. colleges and universities to Brazil on the largest education mission in the history of the Department of Commerce. By talking with thousands of students in three cities (Brasilia, Sao Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro), we learned that Brazilian students are well-prepared and anxious to study in the United States. We also learned from the school representatives that the Brazilian students already studying in the United States bring a unique energy to their campuses. These U.S. schools look forward to hosting even more young Brazilians going forward.

Increased educational exchanges between the United States and Brazil will enhance mutual understanding, strengthen our commercial and strategic ties, and benefit our economies. Education is a win-win opportunity and we are proud to promote the U.S. higher education system to Brazil and the world!

Related:

Building Brazil -U.S. Ties through Education

Education as a Top Service Export

Science without Borders: Brazil is Building the Future by Encouraging Students to Study Abroad

U.S.-Brazil Commercial Dialogue: Fostering Increased Bilateral Trade

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Science Without Borders: Brazil is Building the Future by Encouraging Students to Study Abroad

September 5, 2012

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Cory Churches is an Outreach and Communications Specialist in the Office of Public Affairs within the International Trade Administration

Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff is making advanced education for future workers a high priority. In 2011, she launched the Science Without Borders initiative whereby more than 100,000 Brazilians will spend a year studying abroad by the end of 2015. They will be studying subjects such as biotechnology, ocean science and petroleum engineering which the government regards as essential for the nation’s future.

Students attending the EducationUSA Fair in Brasilia learn about Brazil's Science Without Borders initiative (Photo CJT Online)

Students attending the EducationUSA Fair in Brasilia learn about Brazil’s Science Without Borders initiative (Photo CJT Online)

The Institute for International Education or IIE is administering this initiative for the United States. The program will provide a substantive exchange experience at a U.S. college or university to a diverse group of emerging Brazilian student leaders to widen the academic and research exchange between the U.S. and Brazil. This initiative is the result of joint efforts from two sponsoring organizations, CAPES, the department within the Brazilian Ministry of Education devoted to the evaluation and expansion of higher education in Brazil and CNPq, the department within the Brazilian Ministry of Science and Technology devoted to the advancement of scientific research and technology and to the development of scientific research-related human resources..

Until now, few Brazilians have studied abroad. Last year there were only about 9,000 Brazilians on campuses in the United States (excluding language students). And those Brazilians who have foreign degrees have had a disproportionate influence back home. In the 1960s and 1970s, the government paid for PhDs abroad in oil exploration, agricultural research and aircraft design. Brazil is now a world leader in all three fields.

This week, representatives from 66 U.S. colleges and universities are participating in an education-focused trade mission to Brazil led by Under Secretary for International Trade Francisco Sánchez. Education and training rank among the top 10 U.S. services exports. Tuition and living expenses from international students and their families brought in nearly $21 billion to the U.S. economy during the 2010-2011 academic year.

This trade mission will play an important role in helping participating colleges and universities boost the number of Brazilian students from 9,000, and in doing so, will support those institutions with full tuitions costs – as well as foster important cultural ties between the next generation of the world’s leaders.

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Building Brazil -U.S. Ties through Education

August 31, 2012

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Francisco Sánchez is the Under Secretary for International Trade

The first-ever U.S. Department of Commerce Education Mission to Brazil,taking place this week (August 30-Sept. 6), represents an important opportunity to further strengthen cultural and economic ties between our nations.

Under Secretary Francisco Sánchez launches the Education Fair in Brazilia, Brazil (Photo Commerce)

Under Secretary Francisco Sánchez launches the Education Fair in Brazilia, Brazil (Photo Commerce)

As the largest education mission our agency has organized to any country, I am both honored to lead this mission and enthusiastic about connecting U.S. higher learning institutions with Brazilian students seeking study opportunities in the United States.

During the mission, representatives from 66 accredited U.S. academic institutions will showcase their undergraduate, graduate, community college and intensive English language programs at Education Fairs in Brasilia, São Paulo, and Rio de Janeiro.

We appreciate the leadership of U.S. Ambassador Thomas A. Shannon, Jr., and the U.S. Embassy in Brazil in providing strong support for this education mission as well as their longstanding efforts to promote educational exchanges between our countries.

As Brazil works to expand educational opportunities for its professional workforce, we applaud the leadership of President Dilma Rousseff, and her country’s ambitious goal of sending 101,000 Brazilian students in science and technology fields overseas in the next four years, through her visionary initiative, Science without Borders (SWB).

We look forward to working with the Government of Brazil in achieving success in this nationwide scholarship program to promote higher education abroad. Within SWB, there are 75,000 scholarships funded by the Government of Brazil and 26,000 scholarships funded by the private sector. We want to see many of these future students in one of our exceptional educational institutions in the United States.

At the beginning of the SWB program in 2012, there were 500 Brazilian undergraduate students placed in U.S. schools, followed by an additional 1,400 students later this year. By the end of 2013, there will be 1,500 Brazilian Ph.D. students in U.S. universities.

The benefits to Brazil are numerous. There are inspiring examples of U.S.-educated Brazilian professionals who have returned to their country to strengthen development and innovation in Brazil. For example, Minister of Science, Technology, and Innovation Marco Antônio Raupp earned his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Chicago.

The Institute of International Education (IIE) reports that there were more than 9,000 Brazilians studying in the U.S. in the 201/12 academic year, a 25 percent increase from five years earlier, placing Brazil 14th among all countries with international students in the United States. Beyond that, IIE reports there are more international students (more than 723,000) in the United States than anywhere else.

President Obama— as demonstrated through the United States’100,000 Strong in the Americas initiative—shares a commitment with President Rousseff on the need to build partnerships that address the needs of a 21st century workforce. Brazil is an important partner in this effort, and these initiatives are expected to lead to even greater educational and cultural ties between our countries.

I look forward to spending time in Brazil with the members of the education mission, and advancing the goal of opening new doors to educational opportunity and collaboration. By expanding the avenues to higher learning, we will make a longstanding contribution to future generations who hold the key to continuing our shared prosperity.

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