Posts Tagged ‘DOC’

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Good News in July Export Numbers

October 4, 2011

By John Ward, a writer in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Public Affairs.

Growth in U.S. Exports With Strength in These Sectors: Monthly exports of U.S. goods rose from $77 billion in January 2009 to $125 billion in July 2011. Exports of services rose from $40 billion to $51 billion in the same period. Year over year exports increased $9.6 billion in industrial supplies, $3.4 billion in capital goods, $2.7 billion in automobiles and parts, $2.2 billion in private services, $1.3 billion in travel, and $0.7 billion in royalties and liceneses from July 2010 to July 2011. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, FT-900 release, September 8, 2011.

(Click for Full Size)

Every month, two Department of Commerce bureaus, the Census Bureau and the Bureau of Economic Analysis, issue a report on U.S. international trade in goods and services known as the FT-900 release.

The most recent report covers trade in July 2011. Overall, the news was good for the U.S. economy. Exports of goods and services in July increased 3.6 percent from June to $178 billion. Compared to July 2010, exports of goods and services in July 2011 were up $23.4 billion, or 15.1 percent. This figure was the highest on record.

Goods that showed notable increases included industrial supplies, capital goods, and automobiles. Services that showed increases included private services (such as business, professional, and technical services); travel and tourism; and royalties and license fees.

Reacting to the new export numbers, Rebecca Blank, acting secretary of commerce, noted that “the global marketplace presents vast opportunities for U.S. companies, and today’s trade report shows they are taking advantage of those opportunities.”

To see the full report, visit www.census.gov/ft900.

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Spotlight From Commerce

October 3, 2011

Note: This post originally appeared on The Commerce Blog as part of the Spotlight on Commerce series, which highlights members of the Department of Commerce who are contributing to the president’s vision of winning the future through their work.

Francisco J. Sánchez is the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade.

Francisco Sánchez, under secretary for international trade (left), and Chris DeMoulin, executive vice president of Advanstar Fashion Group and president of MAGIC International (right), cut the ribbon that officially opened the Sourcing at MAGIC show on August 22, 2011, in Las Vegas, Nevada. (photo courtesy U.S. Association of Importers of Textiles and Apparel)

Francisco Sánchez, under secretary for international trade (left), and Chris DeMoulin, executive vice president of Advanstar Fashion Group and president of MAGIC International (right), cut the ribbon that officially opened the Sourcing at MAGIC show on August 22, 2011, in Las Vegas, Nevada. (photo courtesy U.S. Association of Importers of Textiles and Apparel)

I consider myself a lucky guy.

Every day, I have the privilege of serving the American people as the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade.  It is a tremendous honor to be able to give back to a country that has given so much to me.

My story is the American story.  My grandparents and father were immigrants from Spain; they believed in the American Dream, and worked hard to achieve it.

We lived in Tampa, Florida.  Growing up, I learned a lot of lessons that serve me well today.  Through my father, who used to run a candy factory in Spain, I was able to learn how important small- and medium-sized businesses are to a community’s development.  My mother worked as the Director of one of the first Head Start programs in the country.  She wanted all children to get the best possible start in life and dedicated her time to helping others.  That’s why she is my hero.

Together, my parents taught me to love my community and country.  And, they also raised me to take pride in our Hispanic roots, history and culture — and I always have.

Because of their example, from an early age, I knew that I wanted to be involved in public service.  At the federal level, I got my first opportunity in the 1990’s, when I served as a Special Assistant to then-President Bill Clinton.  Eventually, I became an Assistant Secretary of Transportation.

There is nothing like doing work that positively impacts people’s lives and futures.  Even after I went on to the private sector, where I served as an international business consultant, I never lost my desire to come back to government,

That’s why I am so grateful and honored that President Obama selected me to lead the International Trade Administration.  Through my work at the ITA, I’ve met so many talented American entrepreneurs and business-owners.  They are doing innovative work and creating cutting-edge products.  They just need opportunities to sell their ideas and goods.

That’s where we come in.  Our mission is simple: To give people and companies new markets to do business in abroad, so that we can strengthen the economy here at home.  Not only does this bolster their bottom lines, it also supports quality jobs for the American people.  In fact, as President Obama has highlighted, this work is a key to our nation’s continued economic recovery.

Nearly two years ago, the President announced the National Export Initiative.  The goal is to double the nation’s exports by the end of 2014.  I’m proud to say that we’re well on our way to achieving this goal.  And, it’s incredibly rewarding for me to help lead this effort.

It’s also incredibly rewarding to do work outside of the halls of government.  I’ve long been active in the Boys and Girls Club; in fact, I’m honored to be a member of its Hall of Fame.  I’ve also been privileged to mentor young people through the Hillsborough Education Foundation.  And, I’m very proud to be a former board member of the ChairScholars Foundation.

Throughout my life, I have had the opportunity to meet so many unsung heroes who are doing valuable work to touch the lives of those around them.  They are students who take the time to mentor others; parents who find the time to coach the local little league team; volunteers who give up weekends to work at senior centers and so much more.

So, during this Hispanic Heritage Month, I want to give special thanks to all the quiet heroes who have made, and continue to make a difference.  Their names may never appear in the history books, but they’ve made a lasting impact on lives, and enormous contributions to our communities.

Just like my parents.

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Border Export Strategy Impact in El Paso

March 24, 2011

Francisco J. Sánchez is the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade

Today I was in El Paso, Texas with Department of Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and Alan Bersin, Commissioner of the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol to highlight the importance of trade, border security, and the Border Export Strategy.

The International Trade Administration recently launched the Border Export Strategy (BES), which is a priority component of the National Export Initiative, which seeks to double exports from the U.S. by 2015 to support several million jobs.

The City of El Paso is an important gateway between the United States and Mexico, and total merchandise trade that passed through the El Paso district in 2010 amounted to $71.1 billion. More than 80 percent of this trade passed through the port of El Paso.

This strategy is designed to increase the export potential and opportunities for U.S. companies doing business along the shared Canadian and Mexican borders.

We are striving to enhance local public-private trade collaboration and support efforts to reduce trade barriers limiting secure and efficient commerce across our borders.

Despite security challenges in the border region, NAFTA trade statistics show a 29 percent increase in total trade between the U.S. and Mexico from 2009-2010. In addition to close collaboration on security and infrastructure issues in the interagency process, the Departments of Commerce and Homeland Security are working together to identify other potential areas for collaboration on U.S. exports. Potential areas include issues related to the Foreign Trade Zones, a review of the targeting efforts for goods and travelers, and technical assistance to other countries in the world, where customs operations are problematic for exporters and need to be modernized.

The City of El Paso sponsors a foreign-trade zone (FTZ) that is currently used by 19 different companies. In 2010, the El Paso FTZ handled $7.3 billion in merchandise – including $1.7 billion in exports – with more than 900 workers employed by the companies using the FTZ. The Foreign Trade Zone program is just one of the ways in which we can boost employment, manufacturing, and exports from the United States.

As we move forward with the implementation of the BES, I look forward to close collaboration with the Department of Homeland Security and the City of El Paso.

The U.S.-Mexico border is not a border economy. It is a vital part of the national economy of both nations, and I, for my part, will do what it takes to preserve, protect it and grow it.

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Visit to Memphis

October 15, 2010

This post contains external links.  Please review our external linking policy

James Golson is a Commercial Officer in the U.S. Foreign and Commercial Service‘s Strategic Partnership Office.

Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke and U.S Trade Representative Ambassador Ron Kirk were warmly welcomed by the Memphis business community during their visit here this past week.

The Secretary and Ambassador started their trip with a late night visit to FedEx’s global hub to see firsthand the millions of packages that make Memphis the world’s busiest cargo airport and an important center for U.S. exports.

Early the next day, the group traveled to Memphis based Smith & Nephew, a high tech manufacturer of orthopedic equipment.  Smith & Nephew export half of what they produce in Memphis and employ hundreds of people in the Memphis area to support those exports.  This venue provided an excellent backdrop for the Secretary and Ambassador to address a town hall meeting of nearly 50 Memphis based exporting companies.  The meeting focused on the President’s National Export Initiative and how the Department of Commerce, USTR and business can work together to achieve the President’s goal of doubling exports in five years.  The business community was energized by the speech and many in the audience were able to ask questions about the NEI and how they could take advantage of the program.  The Secretary highlighted that the U.S. Commercial Service has partnered with Memphis based FedEx through the New Market Exporter Initiative to identify SMEs that currently export to one market, and that by working together we would assist these companies to find additional markets overseas.

Following the town hall meeting, local Commerce Department staff, including myself, were approached by many of the attendees asking for assistance.  The event was definitely a success and my calendar is booked for the next few weeks meeting with companies that want to expand their exports.

The Secretary and Ambassador concluded their time in Memphis at a roundtable discussion with Memphis based exporters that currently export to Asia.  They discussed the Trans Pacific Partnership and what it means for Memphis.  Many of the executives spoke positively about their interaction with the U.S. Commercial Service.  For example, Chris Schnee of Christie Medical Holdings, noted that his company had not exported two years ago, now they are in 40 countries after conducting over 35 Gold Key matchmaking services with the Commercial Service.  He attributed their export success directly to the assistance provided by the local Memphis office of the Commercial Service.

The Secretary and Ambassador left Memphis later that day but as we engage with more companies in the coming weeks to help them expand into additional markets, the legacy of their trip will live on.

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Are You Headed to Atlanta for the Americas Competitiveness Forum?

September 20, 2010

This post contains external links.  Please review our external linking policy

Francisco J. Sánchez is the Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade


Download full video .mp4 (7.4MB)

The Western Hemisphere is headed to Atlanta in November. My question is, are you?

United States Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke and Mayor Kasim Reed are co-hosting the fourth annual Americas Competitiveness Forum on November 14th to 16th here in Atlanta.  More than 1,000 leaders from the 34 nations of the Americas, including heads of state, will attend this premier event for businesses and government to share new ideas for increasing competitiveness, promoting economic prosperity and raising the standard of living throughout the Americas.

This year’s ACF will focus on innovation and green technologies, education and workforce development, entrepreneurship and small business development, and supply chain connections.

I hope you can participate in this year’s Americas Competiveness Forum. For more information, please visit www.competitivenessforum.org.  I hope to see you in Atlanta.

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Download full video .mp4 (9.9MB)

Todo el Hemisferio Occidental se dirige hacía Atlanta en Noviembre y me pregunto si van ustedes también.

El Secretario de Comercio de los Estados Unidos Gary Locke y el Alcalde de Atlanta Kasim Reed son los anfitriones del cuarto Foro de Competitividad de las Américas que se va a realizar aquí en la Ciudad de Atlanta, Georgia durante el 14 al 16 de noviembre de 2010. El ACF reunirá a más de 1000 líderes de los 34 países de las Américas y el Caribe, incluyendo a Jefes de Estado, para compartir nuevas ideas para promover competitividad, fomentar prosperidad económica, y aumentar el nivel de vida en las Américas.

En éste año, el ACF 2010 se enfocará en innovación y tecnologías eco-ambientales, educación y desarrollo de la fuerza laboral, desarrollo empresarial y de la pequeña empresa, y el comercio internacional, aduanas, logística y la cadena de suministro.

Espero que puedan participar en el Foro de Competitividad de las Américas. Para más información sobre el ACF, por favor visite www.competitivenessforum.org. Ojalá que nos veamos en Atlanta.

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New Manufacturing Council Represents the “Next Generation of Manufacturing”

August 6, 2010

 Melanie Kaplan is an intern in the Office of Advisory Committees and entering her junior year at Wellesley College.

Hot off the press: the Secretary of Commerce has appointed twenty-four members to his Manufacturing Council. When I first heard that I would be working on the Manufacturing Council, I envisioned the traditional “Midwestern steel” companies. After a week of working on the Manufacturing Council, I realized that domestic steel producers were only one part of it with other types of manufactures representing a wide variety of U.S. industries.

Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke announces the appointment of 24 members of the Manufacturing Council

Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke (center) announces the appointment of 24 members of the Manufacturing Council

This spring, the Office of Advisory Committees did a nation-wide search for companies that would best represent the U.S. Manufacturing Sector. From small and medium enterprises (SME’s) to some of the largest manufacturing companies in the country, these companies will provide Secretary Locke with their unfiltered advice and expertise. The Manufacturing Council members announced by Secretary Locke yesterday afternoon at an official ceremony on Capitol Hill where the Secretary was joined by Senators Debbie Stabenow (MI), Sherrod Brown (OH), Jeff Merkley (OR) and Tom Udall (NM) represents the most diverse group of advisors in the Council’s history.  The members, the companies and the industry sectors they represent are:

Bruce Sohn,
President
First Solar, Inc., Chair (AZ)
Joseph B. Anderson, Jr.,
Chairman & CEO
TAG Holdings LLC, Vice Chair (MI)
Luis Arguello,
President
DemeTech (FL)
Greg Bachmann,
Chairman & CEO
Dymax Corporation (CT)
Richard M. Beyer,
Chairman & CEO
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. (TX)
Chandra Brown,
President
Vice President
United Streetcar
Oregon Iron Works, Inc. (OR)
Daniel DiMicco,
Chairman & CEO
Nucor Corporation (NC)
Al Fuller,
Chief Executive Officer
Integrated Packaging Corporation (NJ)
Michael Gambrell,
Executive Vice President
The Dow Chemical Company (MI)
David W. Hastings,
Chairman & CEO
Mount Vernon Mills, Inc. (SC)
Mary Isbister,
President
GenMet (WI)
Kellie Johnson,
President
Ace Clearwater Enterprises (CA)
Fred Keller,
Chairman & CEO
Cascade Engineering (MI)
Samuel Landol,
Chief Operating Officer
Sealaska Corporation (AK/WA)
Michael Laszkiewicz,
Vice President & General Manager
Automation Power Control Business, Rockwell Automation, Inc. (WI)
Daniel P. McGahn,
President & COO
American Superconductor Corporation (MA)
James B. McGregor,
Vice Chairman
The McGregor Metalworking Companies (OH)
Stephen MacMillan,
President, CEO & Chairman
Stryker Corporation (MI)
David Melton,
President & CEO
Sacred Power Corporation (NM)
Jason W. Speer,
Vice President & General Manager
Quality Float Works, Inc. (IL)
Ward J. Timken,
Chairman
The Timken Company (OH)
Peter Ungaro,
Chairman & CEO
CRAY (WA)
Jane L. Warner,
Executive Vice President
Illinois Tool Works (IL)
Donna L. Zobel,
Chairman & CEO
Myron Zucker (MI)

Ex Officio Members:

  • Steven Chu, U.S. Secretary of Energy
  • Hilda L. Solis, U.S. Secretary of Labor
  • Timothy F. Geithner, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury

Many of the companies listed above are the first from their sectors… to be included on the Manufacturing Council. As an intern this summer, I helped the staffers to create a council that encouraged diversity, going green and an understanding of corporate responsibility. One of my favorite parts of the vetting process was seeing the innovative ways the companies gave back to their local, national and global communities. I was also inspired by one of the Manufacturing Council appointees who spoke with such fervor about the “next generation of manufacturing” and how it can and will contribute to U.S. global competitiveness.

Previous Manufacturing Councils have discussed energy costs and alternatives, sustainable manufacturing, tax credits for research and development, market access as well as a variety of other topics. In the upcoming meetings, the issue of credit access for SME’s and how to best allocate resources from American Investment & Recovery Act may be a few of the hottest topics. Additionally, the Manufacturing Council may be involved in Assistant Secretary Nicole Lamb-Hale’s manufacturing trade mission “Manufacture America: Rethink, Retool, Rebuild to Support Jobs” in Fall 2010. Stay tuned for more updates on the Manufacturing Council’s first official meeting scheduled for September 2010…

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Travel and Tourism Advisory Board and the Gulf

July 27, 2010

Melanie Kaplan is an intern in the Office of Advisory Committees and entering her junior year at Wellesley College.

From the now infamous “shrimpers” to the hotel owners in Louisiana to the restaurant employees in Florida panhandle, the BP oil spill has caused wide-spread devastation. Not only is the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration (NOAA) working to counteract the damage, the whole Department of Commerce has stepped up to help Gulf Coast residents and businesses stay ahead of the “orange tide.” Everyone is making an effort to address the harrowing situation at hand from daily conference calls on an inter-bureau level to an inter-agency group working to provide needed relief. The International Trade Administration and the Office of Advisory Committees (OAC) are no exception and worked hard to plan this past Monday’s meeting of the Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (TTAB) in New Orleans. Given the oil spill and the upcoming five year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans seemed the perfect locale to step back and think about how  the government and private sector can work together to promote travel and tourism in the region.

Secretary Locke, along with several other senior Commerce officials and the TTAB committee members supported those suffering from the damages of the oil spill by discussing how they can encourage travel and tourism in the Gulf. On that note, BP recently gave $15 million to the State of Louisiana to fund a marketing campaign to help combat the effects of the oil spill on tourism. At the meeting, Secretary Locke pointed out it was a welcomed contribution and reinforced that “the recovery is going to take a lot of work, a lot of time, and a lot of money and we’re going to have to continually hold BP accountable and hold its feet to the fire.” Furthermore, the unity demonstrated by government and business at the meeting highlighted the importance of the jobs created by the travel and tourism sector, which directly and indirectly includes one in every sixteen Americans. As an intern, I have helped plan the event from participating in conference calls to updating the guest list, and putting together briefing binders, and am happy to have made my own small contribution to improving the lives of the Gulf Coast residents and businesses. If you are interested in volunteering or just want more information on efforts to restore the Gulf, please visit RestoreTheGulf.gov, the official federal portal for the Deepwater BP oil spill response and recovery.

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Civil Nuclear Trade Mission – Poland

July 19, 2010

Francisco J. Sánchez is the Undersecretary of Commerce for International Trade

I have spent the last few days in Warsaw, Poland, on the first stop of a Civil Nuclear Trade Mission.  Traveling with me are other member of the Department of Commerce, as well as team leads from the Department of State and the Department of Energy.  The impressive government team represents this Administration’s commitment not only to nuclear energy, but to working together as an inter-agency unit to fulfill the goals of the National Export Initiative.  We also have the pleasure of the company of nine of America’s top companies in the nuclear energy sector, as well as representation from our academic community.  Together we represent the leadership, skills, support, and partnership to help this region of the world meet their nuclear energy goals.  And our strong ally and friend Poland is the perfect place to start – here’s to old friendships and new partnerships!

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Discussion Panel at the White House Clean Energy Forum

July 16, 2010

Courtney Gregoire is Director, National Export Initiative.

Today, I moderated a panel at the White House Clean Energy Forum on “International Leadership, Competitiveness, and Exports” featuring three industry leaders: Bruce Sohn, President of First Solar; Mary Ann Wright, Vice President of Global Technology and Innovation Accelerator for Johnson Controls; and Steve Bolze, the President and CEO of GE Power and Water.

With approximately 100 clean energy business and thought leaders, Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke kicked off the forum with his words:  “The development of clean energy and energy efficient technologies could spur the greatest economic opportunity of the 21st century.”

A spirited conversation ensued as panelists and audience members alike commented that the key to expanding clean energy exports is increasing domestic demand for clean energy, and that starts with enacting comprehensive energy legislation.   Others commented on the significant clean energy investments made by other countries from China to Brazil to Germany.  Competing in this globally competitive marketplace, as one audience member put it, requires a call for the “revolutionary, not evolutionary.”

ITA is attempting to rise to that challenge by developing a strategy to double renewable energy and energy efficiency exports in the next five years as part of President Obama’s National Export Initiative.

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Secretary Locke and U.S. Postmaster General Potter Sign Agreement to Boost Exports

July 12, 2010

(This post contains external links.  Please review our external linking policy.)

Adam Wilczewski is the Director of Strategic Partnerships in the International Trade Administration’s U.S. Commercial Service.  Stephanie Smedile is the Strategic Partnership Manager overseeing the U.S. Postal Service relationship.

The National Export Initiative is already driving broad government coordination – just take a look at www.trade.gov/nei to see what’s happening – but now the private sector is engaging in new ways, too.

Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and U.S. Postmaster General John Potter shake hands after signing agreement.

Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and U.S. Postmaster General John Potter shake hands after signing agreement to boost Exports in a ceremony on July 12, 2010.

Today Commerce Secretary Gary Locke and the U.S. Postal Service’s Postmaster General & CEO, John Potter, announced the launch of a new effort, the New Market Exporter Initiative (NMEI), to help boost U.S. exporters.  The NMEI will identify current U.S. Postal Service customers who are exporting their goods and services abroad, and working with ITA, help them expand their reach to additional international markets.  This initiative builds on an already successful relationship between the U.S. Postal Service and the U.S. Commercial Service’s Strategic Partnership Program.

With less than one percent of America’s 30 million companies exporting, and of those companies exporting, only 58 percent selling to one international market, we know there is potential for American companies to expand export sales.  The NMEI’s goal is to educate U.S. exporters, particularly small and medium-sized companies, about the benefits of expanding their exports to additional markets.  In addition, we want to inform them of the public and private sector resources to assist them.  To reach our goal, we are engaging partners like the U.S. Postal Service, FedEx, and UPS to provide assistance to targeted exporting customers.

The buzz is already starting – take a look at Bloomberg’s Businessweek or PR Newswire to learn more about today’s event.

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