Posts Tagged ‘jobs’

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Colorfully Illustrated Trade Facts and Statistics

July 13, 2011

Carrie Bevis is an intern at the International Trade Administration’s Office of Public Affairs.

Yesterday afternoon, I had the pleasure of sitting through my very first trade statistics briefing after U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke released the US International Trade in Goods and Services report compiled by the Commerce Department’s U.S. Census Bureau and the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. It was announced that though exports decreased by 0.5 percent in May, total exports are still up 16.4 percent compared to the same period last year.

Exports supported 2.4 million jobs in 2009, 21.9% of all manufacturing jobs in the U.S.

Exports supported 2.4 million jobs in 2009, 21.9% of all manufacturing jobs in the U.S.

To my delight, all of the trade stats were illustrated in a medley of attractive and understandable graphs and tables. In 2009, that one out of every 21 private sector jobs was supported by U.S. manufactured exports was displayed in a pleasing pie chart while the fact that the value of exports to support one job rose to $181,000 was brandished in a bar graph.

All numbers aside, the key message is that the U.S. Department of Commerce is still as committed as ever to accelerating job growth and providing businesses with the tools they need to be globally competitive. “As we move closer to reaching the president’s goal of doubling exports by 2015, the Obama administration will continue to help businesses reach the 95 percent of consumers who live outside our borders,” Locke said.

Despite an increase in the trade deficit of 15.1 percent due to a 2.6 percent increase in imports of goods and services, the department is happy to report that U.S. exports support an estimated 9.2 million jobs in 2010 which is up from 8.7 million in 2009. This nugget of knowledge was announced in July’s blog post Exports Support U.S. Jobs  which highlighted the brief on Projected Jobs Supported by Exports for 2009 and 2010. More spotlight stories highlighting export-related jobs can be found at the online Office of Competition and Economic Analysis.

For more fresh facts from the export statistics released yesterday, check out the handy-dandy Fact Sheet. If you want a deeper break down of the information, ITA has published several other reports that can be found under Industry Analysis from the trade.gov homepage. For example, State Reports provides a detailed analysis of the effects of international trade on all 50 states, from the how foreign investment is creating jobs in Alabama to Wyoming’s dependence on world markets.

Stay tuned for more tasty tidbits of trade facts!

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Exports Support U.S. Jobs

July 6, 2011

Joseph Flynn is the Director of the International Trade Administration’s Office of Competition and Economic Analysis

Projected Jobs Supported by Exports, 2009 and 2010 CoverDid you know that 9.2 million jobs in the United States last year were tied directly to exports? The International Trade Administration this week issued a report, Projected Jobs Supported by Exports, 2009 and 2010, which updates an earlier ITA report Exports Support American Jobs. This report provides preliminary estimates for jobs supported by exports for 2009 and for the value of exports that support one job for 2009 and 2010. This report attempts to improve projections, provide transparency in making the projections, and provide revised estimates for 2009 and 2010. The revised estimates of jobs supported by exports are 8.7 million in 2009 and 9.2 million in 2010.

The value of exports that supports one job was $164,000 in 2009 and $181,000 for 2010. That is, the value fell slightly from 2008 to 2009 because of the recession and softness in export prices. In 2010, the value increased to $181,000 as export prices and productivity strengthened. Thus, for every billion dollars of exports, over 5,000 jobs are supported.

Not only do exports support millions of U.S. jobs, those jobs actually pay more than jobs in similar sectors unrelated to exports. Earlier work by the International Trade Administration gives an idea of how much more pay they receive. The report Weekly Earnings in Export-Intensive U.S. Services Industries estimates that workers in export-intensive services industries earn 15 to 20 percent more than comparable workers in other industries. Similarly, the report Do Jobs in Export Industries Still Pay More? And Why? estimates that exports contribute an additional 18 percent to workers’ earnings on average in the U.S. manufacturing sector.

The International Trade Administration publishes a variety of reports on international trade and economic issues.

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U.S. Aerospace Industry Goes Big at the 2011 Paris Air Show

June 16, 2011

Jonathan Chesebro is an International Trade Specialist for Manufacturing and Services within the International Trade Administration. He is a member of the Aerospace Team and focuses on analysis and promotion of the aerospace industry.

On June 20, the Department of Commerce and the global aerospace industry will descend upon Le Bourget Exhibition Center in Paris France for the 49th annual Paris Air Show (PAS), the world’s largest aerospace trade exhibition in 2011.  Francisco Sánchez, Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade, will lead the Department of Commerce delegation to support the President’s National Export Initiative (NEI) and the U.S. aerospace industry.  The show attracts the participation of CEOs from the major U.S. and foreign aerospace companies as well as high-level government officials from around the world.

SALON DU BOURGET 2009 THE PARIS AIRSHOW 2009

Salon du Bourget 2009 The Paris Airshow 2009

With over 2,000 exhibitors, 340,000 visitors, and 200 international delegations in attendance, the show provides the ideal opportunity for ITA to partner with U.S. industry to support NEI goals, advocate for U.S aerospace companies bidding on contracts and hold policy discussions with foreign governments.  In addition, ITA will exchange views with Congressional and state delegations attending the trade show.

The U.S. aerospace industry is internationally competitive and is the largest in the world.  The industry includes the manufacturing of civil and military aircraft, missiles, space vehicles, and parts of all of the foregoing.  Despite the lingering effects of the global economic downturn, the industry continued to show reasonable strength in 2010, contributing $78 billion in export sales to the U.S. economy.  The industry’s positive trade balance of $44 billion is the largest trade surplus of any manufacturing industry and came from exporting 42 percent of all aerospace production and 72 percent of civil aircraft and component production.

According to a 2008 study by the U.S. Department of Commerce, aerospace supports more jobs through exports than any other industry.  The U.S. aerospace industry directly supports about 430,000 jobs and indirectly supports more than 700,000 additional jobs.  In addition, U.S. aerospace workers are well-paid, earning 47 percent more than manufacturing workers generally

Foreign firms are attracted to the U.S. aerospace market because it is the largest in the world and has a skilled workforce, extensive distribution systems, diverse products, and strong support at the local and national level for policy and promotion.  Industry estimates indicate that the annual increase in the number of large commercial airplanes added to the worldwide fleet over the next 20 years will be 3.2 percent per year for a total of 30,900 valued at $3.6 trillion at list prices.

The Commerce Department has been actively supporting U.S. aerospace industry competitiveness through a series of recent events.  In June 2010, Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing and Services Nicole Lamb-Hale delivered keynote remarks during the “ExportNow: New Markets, New Jobs for Kansas” event where more than 150 companies, learned about the economic opportunities of international trade.  U.S. aerospace companies Hawker Beechcraft Corporation and Spirit Aero Systems were among those in attendance, as well as the National Center for Aviation Training, which opened in 2010 and provides training in the areas of general aviation manufacturing and aircraft and power plant mechanics.  Wichita is a major U.S. aerospace manufacturing cluster and is home to hundreds of aerospace companies that employ over 40,000 people.

Another area where the Commerce Department is supporting U.S. aerospace industry competitiveness is in the area of foreign direct investment.  In February 2010, Under Secretary Francisco Sánchez participated in the opening ceremony for a new Embraer assembly facility in Melbourne, Florida.  Embraer is a Brazilian manufacturer of commercial, general aviation, and defense aircraft, and this new plant will employ up to 200 people from the area and represents a $50 million investment.  This significant investment supports the President’s NEI goals since some of the facilities products will be exported.  It also demonstrates the competitiveness of the U.S. aerospace industry in the global marketplace since Embraer chose to invest in the U.S. rather than in another market.

ITA has also worked with Boeing’s Supplier Management Office to organize a webinar for U.S. aerospace companies that discussed how to participate in Boeing’s global supply chain, which includes over 22,000 small, medium, and large companies.  In addition, ITA organized a webinar with Airbus procurement officials and over 200 companies where Airbus officials discussed the company’s procurement strategy and how U.S. companies can become part of its supply chain.

The U.S. aerospace industry is a significant contributor to U.S. exports, jobs and economic growth, which is why the industry is a priority sector under the NEI.  The more that U.S. aerospace companies export, the more they produce, and the more workers they need.

Stay tuned for a second article on the Paris Air Show!

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The Business of Smart Grid

May 24, 2010

(This post contains external links.  Please review our external linking policy.)

Shannon Fraser serves in the Office of Energy and Environmental Industries, where she advances opportunities for U.S. energy companies through policy dialogues and export programs.  Shannon has specialized in a number of energy sectors, including smart grid and transmission/distribution.

What is a Smart Grid?  How does it impact U.S. Industry?

Signs of U.S. innovation, job creation, and economic revitalization are now underway with the numerous smart grid programs that are being implemented throughout the United States.  As of May 4, 2010, eighty-three of the smart grid projects funded through the stimulus bill are being integrated in local communities throughout the United States.  In total, the U.S. government has put forward $4.5 billion of smart grid stimulus funds as well as $7 billion of broadband deployment funds which will ensure that the required communications network for smart grid reaches all local and rural communities.

With all of the recent smart grid talk, what exactly is smart grid technology?  How will consumers and industry be impacted by this new grid system?  What market opportunities are available to the new, emerging smart grid companies, and how will a smart grid system foster job growth and a new, innovative clean energy economy in the United States?

Smart grid, quite simply, is a system which integrates the traditional transmission and distribution (T&D) network with an over-lay of information communications technologies (ICT).  The smart grid allows your power lines to communicate with your air conditioner, electric vehicle, wash machine, and cell phone, thereby allowing for you to proactively manage your energy use and electricity bill.  From a business perspective, electricity-intensive industries will be better able to track and manage their overall energy usage, thereby encouraging energy efficient practices and solutions throughout the facility.

The United States has taken an all-encompassing approach to the smart grid, highlighting a two-way flow of electricity and information to/from power plants, customers, equipment, appliances, and vehicles.  The definition of smart grid in other countries depends on the current T&D infrastructure in the country, as well as government and industry priorities and policies.   It is worth noting that a country will need basic T&D infrastructure before embarking on smart grid integration – if a country does not have power poles and transmission lines, then they are far away from developing a smart grid network.

The Department of Energy estimates that the benefits of a modernized grid system in the United States will span from $46 to $117 billion by 2023.  With a more secure and reliable grid network, U.S. businesses are estimated to save $100 billion per year, funds which can be redirected to the installation of new equipment in a facility and the hiring of new workers in a factory.  With recent federal smart grid funding programs, we have already witnessed U.S. companies that are taking on new workers.  Itron, smart grid company based in Waseca, Minnesota recently added 40 new workers to its facility, in addition to 120 new employees at its operations in South Carolina.

Countries worldwide are also implementing smart grid stimulus programs at local communities.  Australia, Brazil, China, the European Union, India, Japan, and South Korea are among the growing number of countries which are advancing the development and deployment of smart grid systems through public-private programs.  In many instances, U.S. companies are partnering with in-country utility companies and partnering companies to integrate U.S. smart grid components into the grid network.  Moreover, the emergence of electric vehicles, smart appliances, and smart products will foster greater international trade opportunities in the smart grid sector.

The International Trade Administration will highlight the business benefits of smart grid at the June 9, 2010 conference on “The Business of Smart Grid: Benefits for Minnesota’s Companies and Workforce.”  Coordinated in partnership with the Minnesota Trade Office and the University of Minnesota, this one-day program will highlight the emerging business and job creation opportunities generated by recent smart grid initiatives that impact numerous sectors of U.S. business and industry.

About the International Trade Administration-Manufacturing and Services

The International Trade Administration (ITA) strengthens the competitiveness of U.S. industry, promotes trade and investment, and ensures fair trade through the rigorous enforcement of our trade laws and agreements.  ITA works to improve the global business environment and helps U.S. organization compete at home and abroad.  ITA supports President Obama’s recovery agenda and the National Export Initiative to sustain economic growth and support American jobs.

The Manufacturing and Services (MAS) unit of the International Trade Administration (ITA) is dedicated to enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. industry, expanding its market access, and increasing its exports. MAS industry experts and economists perform strategic research and analysis in order to shape and implement trade policy, create conditions that encourage innovation, lower the cost of doing business, and promote U.S. economic growth.

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