Posts Tagged ‘Locke’

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New Manufacturing Council Represents the “Next Generation of Manufacturing”

August 6, 2010

 Melanie Kaplan is an intern in the Office of Advisory Committees and entering her junior year at Wellesley College.

Hot off the press: the Secretary of Commerce has appointed twenty-four members to his Manufacturing Council. When I first heard that I would be working on the Manufacturing Council, I envisioned the traditional “Midwestern steel” companies. After a week of working on the Manufacturing Council, I realized that domestic steel producers were only one part of it with other types of manufactures representing a wide variety of U.S. industries.

Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke announces the appointment of 24 members of the Manufacturing Council

Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke (center) announces the appointment of 24 members of the Manufacturing Council

This spring, the Office of Advisory Committees did a nation-wide search for companies that would best represent the U.S. Manufacturing Sector. From small and medium enterprises (SME’s) to some of the largest manufacturing companies in the country, these companies will provide Secretary Locke with their unfiltered advice and expertise. The Manufacturing Council members announced by Secretary Locke yesterday afternoon at an official ceremony on Capitol Hill where the Secretary was joined by Senators Debbie Stabenow (MI), Sherrod Brown (OH), Jeff Merkley (OR) and Tom Udall (NM) represents the most diverse group of advisors in the Council’s history.  The members, the companies and the industry sectors they represent are:

Bruce Sohn,
President
First Solar, Inc., Chair (AZ)
Joseph B. Anderson, Jr.,
Chairman & CEO
TAG Holdings LLC, Vice Chair (MI)
Luis Arguello,
President
DemeTech (FL)
Greg Bachmann,
Chairman & CEO
Dymax Corporation (CT)
Richard M. Beyer,
Chairman & CEO
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. (TX)
Chandra Brown,
President
Vice President
United Streetcar
Oregon Iron Works, Inc. (OR)
Daniel DiMicco,
Chairman & CEO
Nucor Corporation (NC)
Al Fuller,
Chief Executive Officer
Integrated Packaging Corporation (NJ)
Michael Gambrell,
Executive Vice President
The Dow Chemical Company (MI)
David W. Hastings,
Chairman & CEO
Mount Vernon Mills, Inc. (SC)
Mary Isbister,
President
GenMet (WI)
Kellie Johnson,
President
Ace Clearwater Enterprises (CA)
Fred Keller,
Chairman & CEO
Cascade Engineering (MI)
Samuel Landol,
Chief Operating Officer
Sealaska Corporation (AK/WA)
Michael Laszkiewicz,
Vice President & General Manager
Automation Power Control Business, Rockwell Automation, Inc. (WI)
Daniel P. McGahn,
President & COO
American Superconductor Corporation (MA)
James B. McGregor,
Vice Chairman
The McGregor Metalworking Companies (OH)
Stephen MacMillan,
President, CEO & Chairman
Stryker Corporation (MI)
David Melton,
President & CEO
Sacred Power Corporation (NM)
Jason W. Speer,
Vice President & General Manager
Quality Float Works, Inc. (IL)
Ward J. Timken,
Chairman
The Timken Company (OH)
Peter Ungaro,
Chairman & CEO
CRAY (WA)
Jane L. Warner,
Executive Vice President
Illinois Tool Works (IL)
Donna L. Zobel,
Chairman & CEO
Myron Zucker (MI)

Ex Officio Members:

  • Steven Chu, U.S. Secretary of Energy
  • Hilda L. Solis, U.S. Secretary of Labor
  • Timothy F. Geithner, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury

Many of the companies listed above are the first from their sectors… to be included on the Manufacturing Council. As an intern this summer, I helped the staffers to create a council that encouraged diversity, going green and an understanding of corporate responsibility. One of my favorite parts of the vetting process was seeing the innovative ways the companies gave back to their local, national and global communities. I was also inspired by one of the Manufacturing Council appointees who spoke with such fervor about the “next generation of manufacturing” and how it can and will contribute to U.S. global competitiveness.

Previous Manufacturing Councils have discussed energy costs and alternatives, sustainable manufacturing, tax credits for research and development, market access as well as a variety of other topics. In the upcoming meetings, the issue of credit access for SME’s and how to best allocate resources from American Investment & Recovery Act may be a few of the hottest topics. Additionally, the Manufacturing Council may be involved in Assistant Secretary Nicole Lamb-Hale’s manufacturing trade mission “Manufacture America: Rethink, Retool, Rebuild to Support Jobs” in Fall 2010. Stay tuned for more updates on the Manufacturing Council’s first official meeting scheduled for September 2010…

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Travel and Tourism Advisory Board and the Gulf

July 27, 2010

Melanie Kaplan is an intern in the Office of Advisory Committees and entering her junior year at Wellesley College.

From the now infamous “shrimpers” to the hotel owners in Louisiana to the restaurant employees in Florida panhandle, the BP oil spill has caused wide-spread devastation. Not only is the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration (NOAA) working to counteract the damage, the whole Department of Commerce has stepped up to help Gulf Coast residents and businesses stay ahead of the “orange tide.” Everyone is making an effort to address the harrowing situation at hand from daily conference calls on an inter-bureau level to an inter-agency group working to provide needed relief. The International Trade Administration and the Office of Advisory Committees (OAC) are no exception and worked hard to plan this past Monday’s meeting of the Travel and Tourism Advisory Board (TTAB) in New Orleans. Given the oil spill and the upcoming five year anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans seemed the perfect locale to step back and think about how  the government and private sector can work together to promote travel and tourism in the region.

Secretary Locke, along with several other senior Commerce officials and the TTAB committee members supported those suffering from the damages of the oil spill by discussing how they can encourage travel and tourism in the Gulf. On that note, BP recently gave $15 million to the State of Louisiana to fund a marketing campaign to help combat the effects of the oil spill on tourism. At the meeting, Secretary Locke pointed out it was a welcomed contribution and reinforced that “the recovery is going to take a lot of work, a lot of time, and a lot of money and we’re going to have to continually hold BP accountable and hold its feet to the fire.” Furthermore, the unity demonstrated by government and business at the meeting highlighted the importance of the jobs created by the travel and tourism sector, which directly and indirectly includes one in every sixteen Americans. As an intern, I have helped plan the event from participating in conference calls to updating the guest list, and putting together briefing binders, and am happy to have made my own small contribution to improving the lives of the Gulf Coast residents and businesses. If you are interested in volunteering or just want more information on efforts to restore the Gulf, please visit RestoreTheGulf.gov, the official federal portal for the Deepwater BP oil spill response and recovery.

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Secretary of Commerce Hosts Haiti Reconstruction Business Dialogue

April 30, 2010

Jennifer Wenger started working for the International Trade Administration one year ago.  She is an international trade specialist in the Market Access and Compliance unit’s Office of North and Central America and the Caribbean.

Last week I had the opportunity to attend the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Haiti Reconstruction Business Dialogue.  Hosted on April 20 by Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke, with keynote remarks by Haitian Minister Patrick Delatour, the event yielded an overwhelming 400 attendees who came with an interest in leveraging private sector participation to assist in Haiti’s rebuilding.   Representatives of the U.S. and Haitian business communities engaged in a lively dialogue with private sector and U.S. government panelists.  The unexpected presence of recording artist Wyclef Jean added some starpower to the program, including his “tweets” to his 1.4 million followers on Twitter.


Download full video .mp4 (88MB)

Attendees used every free moment to network.  During the Q&A, the audience members asked great questions about the meaning of the international community’s pledges and where to learn about procurement opportunities.   USAID’s Haiti Task Team Coordinator Paul Weisenfeld explained that the $1.15 billion pledge made by the U.S. Government must be approved by Congress before these monies become available to fund projects.  Other panelists pointed the participants to useful websites or provided guidance on submitting proposals. Despite the devastating losses that the people of Haiti experienced and the challenges ahead, the tone of panelists, participants and especially Minister Delatour, was hopeful.  Minister Delatour cited the Port-au-Prince Hotel Montana, which was destroyed in the earthquake, as “a symbol of the resilience” of the Haitian population as he reported that the hotel’s owners have declared their intention to rebuild.  The Minister emphasized that the goal is to not just to rebuild but to “build back Haiti better.”


Download full video .mp4 (88MB)

Secretary Locke stressed the importance of supporting Haiti as an Administration priority and addressed the private sector saying, “You will play a critical role in providing these opportunities through trade and investment that will benefit people in both Haiti and the United States.”   Participants and speakers alike agreed that the governments, NGOs and the private sector must work cooperatively to rebuild an economically sustainable Haiti.


Download full video .mp4 (88MB)

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A Blue Print for Export-Driven Jobs Growth

February 4, 2010

Mary Trupo is the International Trade Administration’s Director of the Office of Public Affairs.

The National Press Club is abuzz with excitement as Secretary Gary Locke prepares to roll out the National Export Initiative (NEI), unveiled during President Obama’s State of the Union Address.  During last week’s speech, the president announced a goal of doubling exports over the next five years to support 2 million jobs in America. The NEI, the first of its kind, represents a government-wide export-promotion strategy in the U.S. with focused attention from the president and his cabinet.

As I sit here in the throng of reporters, members of Congress and invited guests, I am struck by how much work, collaboration and passion has gone into creating this historic initiative. Much more work is ahead as we promote and engage American businesses to take advantage of the expanded programs that the Secretary just announced.

I am excited to be part of this moment and know that through the efforts of the talented and dedicated global staff within ITA, we will reach the goal of increasing exports and assisting more U.S. companies who are either new to exporting or export ready, to expand into new markets.

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Green Building Takes Root in Copenhagen

December 14, 2009

(This post contains external links.  Please review our external linking policy.)

Keith Curtis is a senior Foreign Service Officer currently based in the U.S. Commercial Service’s Office of International Operations. He is the Commercial Service’s senior advisor on energy efficiency and renewable energy.

The atmosphere in Copenhagen is charged with activity.  Nobody is saving on personal energy – and everyone seems to be filled with a passion to make their point and make things happen.  At the U.S. Presence Center at Bright Green, the International Trade Administration (ITA) was making its point bright and early at the 9:00 Green Building Seminar and the 10:15 Bright Green, “Solutions at Your Doorstep” panel discussion.  Bringing the momentum of the Green Build Road Show to Copenhagen, we laid out for the delegates, NGOs, and students the wide and deep variety of everything going on in the States on Green Buildings.  The audience seemed to especially like the story of the Greening of the Empire State Building as told first hand by Clay Nesler, VP of  Johnson Controls (did you know Johnson Controls produced the first commercial thermostat?).  He described how the tens of thousands of windows would be replaced and lighting and installation changed office by office in the ¼ mile high icon of the American Industrial Age so that when done, they would be using 37% less electricity.  Roger Platt, VP of the US Green Building Council talked about how Green Building was spreading around the world, and the Department of Energy talked about how it was creating the first net-zero (uses no electricity from the Grid overall) large scale commercial building for their National Renewable Energy Laboratory, in Golden, Colorado.

The Green Building panel was followed by a second discussion organized by ITA to explain the wide range of bio-fuels, energy efficient manufacturing, and renewable energy technologies that the U.S. is delivering to the world. Kirsty Mac Donald of Intel talked about the modernization of the grid and all the intelligent hardware that will go into homes and vehicles.  Did you know that every wind turbine has a half a dozen IT chips in it?  Honeywell told how their bio-fuels are now being tested in regular commercial airlines for trans-Atlantic flights.  The audience was curious and impressed, but the students, who sported T-shirts saying, “How old will you be in 2050?” added a special sense of urgency to the challenges we were all talking about, although the industry presentations pointed them to ways that U.S. technology is already creating real change and reducing our reliance on fossil fuels.

And we heard our second Cabinet official, Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar, speak to a full house as we looked forward to hearing our own Secretary Gary Locke speak tomorrow.  There is certainly a lot going on already at the COP15 even before the 100 Heads of State arrive.

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Sustainability and U.S. Competitiveness Summit

November 2, 2009
 

 

 

 

Morgan Barr is an International Economist with the Office of Trade Policy Analysis.  She has been working on the Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative for two years and started in the office as a SCEP focusing on earning her MBA and MA in international affairs from the George Washington University.

On October 8, our Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative team hosted the Sustainability and U.S. Competitiveness Summit at the Commerce Department.  The event was a complete success.  We had more than 120 representatives from private industry, industry associations, non-governmental organizations, academia and major federal agencies in attendance.  The Summit was a follow up to a similar event we held in 2007, and we wanted to report to our stakeholders on the work we’ve done since then.  We also wanted to gain input from attendees on possible areas of future work for our initiative.

Sustainability Summit Event Poster

Sustainability Summit Event Poster

The enthusiasm from the attendees was tremendous.  We had two extended coffee breaks and a lunch session where attendees could network and meet with representatives from various government agencies to learn about the programs and resources that are available to help them.

The event began with opening remarks from Secretary Gary Locke, who stressed the importance of manufacturing as a source of well-paying jobs and emphasized the role that sustainable practices can play in lowering costs and making manufacturers more competitive.  The Secretary was followed by Gary Guzy, Deputy Director and General Counsel for the White House Council on Environmental Quality, who discussed the plans for the development of the “green economy”.

Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke speaks at the Sustainability Summit

Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke speaks at the Sustainability Summit. (U.S. Department of Commerce photo)

Then our team presented its work.  In the past two years, we’ve created an interagency group on sustainable manufacturing to coordinate action across the government, and we’ve also held a series of regional facility tours—or SMARTs—to promote the adoption of sustainable practices. Our newest deliverable is our Sustainable Business Program and Resource Clearinghouse—a searchable central database that includes numerous federal government programs and resources to support sustainable business and manufacturing practices.

We’re also working on a study being conducted in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) on simplified metrics for sustainable manufacturing.  Michael Bordt of the OECD presented his work to date on the study, which will include an easy-to-use toolkit with a simplified set of metrics and guidance on how companies can use them to help make business decisions about improving their environmental performance.  You can read more about the study and our other projects on our website.

Attendees at the Sustainability Summit exchange explore the displays in the Commerce Department's lobby

Attendees at the Sustainability Summit exchange explore the displays in the Commerce Department’s lobby. (U.S. Department of Commerce photo)

In the afternoon, Andrew Winston, co-author of Green to Gold, and author of Green Recovery, gave an excellent keynote address on the linkages between sustainability and competitiveness.  His address really set the stage for the afternoon breakout sessions where attendees met in smaller groups to discuss the morning’s presentations, the challenges they’ve faced implementing sustainable business practices, and areas where the government can potentially aid the private sector in its endeavors. The discussion in the sessions was excellent, and we’re going to use the individual input, along with other factors, when we’re planning our future work on the initiative.

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Globalization in the Midst of Recession-Prominent Business and Government Officials Headline Utah’s World Trade Week Conference

June 4, 2009

(This post was written on May 20, 2009. This post contains external links.  Please review our external linking policy.)

Dave Fiscus is the Director of the U.S. Foreign & Commercial Service‘s Utah Export Assistance Center, where he helps Utah companies compete and succeed in the international marketplace. He’s been with the International Trade Administration for ten years.

Greetings from Salt Lake City, home of the 2002 Winter Olympics and one of the fastest growing export markets in the country! I’m here at Zions Bank’s 8th Annual International Trade and Business Conference. Zions Bank, a corporate partner of the U.S. Foreign & Commercial Service (CS), has assembled a great cast of speakers to address this year’s topic, “Globalization in the Midst of Recession.” Zions Bank’s President and CEO, Scott Anderson, just provided opening remarks, in which the Zions Bank-CS partnership featured prominently (a great highlight for the CS and for the corporate partnership program!).

Over 800 members of Utah’s business community turned out for this half day event of presentations from officials representing all sectors of the economy from government to manufacturing to academia.

Rick Wade, Senior Advisor and Deputy Chief of Staff for the Department of Commerce just concluded his kick-off remarks. They were spot on with the theme of the conference and very well received by attendees. He pointed out that Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke said in his confirmation hearing that he is committed to “work every day to make the Commerce Department an engine for improving our competitiveness, encouraging innovation, and creating jobs.” Furthermore, he stated that partnerships are a critical component of this goal, and the Secretary and our team intend to strengthen our relationships with business, other federal agencies, and state and local organizations to position the United States as a global leader in exports and innovation.

Rick Wade at the International Trade and Business Conference, Salt Lake City, May 20, 2009

Rick Wade, Deputy Chief of Staff, Department of Commerce, speaks at the Zions Bank’s 8th Annual International Trade and Business Conference in Salt Lake City, Utah on May 20, 2009. (U.S. Department of Commerce photo)

The audience also just heard that last year, exports accounted for 13 percent of U.S. economic growth and supported millions of jobs in the United States. The U.S. exported an astounding $1.84 trillion worth of goods and services. To put this in historical context, exports accounted for nearly 10 percent of our gross domestic product five years earlier and 5 percent 40 years ago.

Governor Jon M. Huntsman, Jr., who was recently appointed as the next U.S. Ambassador to China by President Obama, just stopped by to accept Utah’s “Internationalist of the Year Award”. The Governor provided remarks, underscoring the theme of the day. A fitting send-off for a leader who made Utah’s global competitiveness a hallmark of his tenure at the helm of the state.

Well, we’re going into a break and my colleague Jeff Hamilton and I need to head over to the Commercial Service Utah table in the exhibitor information section of the conference alongside Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee partners Ex-Im Bank and SBA as well as various local trade multipliers. Russell Roberts, Professor of Economics at George Mason University and Tom Donohue, President and CEO of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce are slated to round out the day’s agenda.

Best from the American West!

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