Posts Tagged ‘Manufacturing Council’

h1

Keeping the United States on Top of Manufacturing Innovation

June 9, 2014
A manufacturing worker works on an automobile engine.

The Department of Commerce’s Manufacturing Council wants the United States to remain a manufacturing leader.

Michael Laszkiewicz is the Chair of the Manufacturing Council. He is the Vice President and General Manager of Rockwell Automation.

I serve as chair of the Manufacturing Council, which advises Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker on the manufacturing industry. The Council is composed of representatives from large and small manufacturers from across the United States.

Our objective is to identify and recommend ways the U.S. government can respond to the challenges facing U.S. manufacturers to ensure our competitiveness at home and abroad.

At our most recent meeting, the Council adopted three letters of recommendation focused on workforce development best practices; a national campaign to address the misperceptions around manufacturing careers; and a shale gas study to inform liquid natural gas export policy decisions, and opportunities in manufacturing, innovation, and research and development.

We believe these recommendations will better position the United States as a leader not just in manufacturing productivity, but in manufacturing and science innovation. Having the right technology, the right workforce, and the appropriate level of respect for the manufacturing industry is crucial to protecting U.S. jobs and the long-term health of the economy.

Below is a summary of our recommendations.  For more information, you can read the Council’s full recommendations at: http://trade.gov/manufacturingcouncil/.

Recommendations for Manufacturing Innovation, Research and Development:

  • Designate federal manufacturing innovation programs as an Interagency Science and Technology Initiative.
  • The Administration strengthens the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation and the role of the national labs.

Recommendations to Improve Workforce Development and the Public Perception of Manufacturing:

  • Develop a national manufacturing perceptions campaign to reset America’s manufacturing mindset.
  • Realign Workforce development programs for Advanced Production Technologies.

Recommendation for Manufacturing Energy Policy: 

  • Lead a study evaluating the implications of natural gas exports on jobs and economic growth.
h1

Wishing You A Happy Manufacturing Day!

September 26, 2013

Mary Isbister is the President of GenMet Corp., and the Vice Chair of the Department of Commerce’s Manufacturing Council.

Making stuff is cool!

This is something manufacturers know very well. It is, however, a well kept secret and one that desperately needs to be shared with students, parents, educators, and our communities at large. Manufacturing Day, celebrated Oct. 4, 2013, is a fantastic opportunity for manufacturers to let the cat out of the bag, put themselves on display, and let the country know how important – and how interesting – manufacturing is.

GenMet will be sponsoring its second Manufacturing Day event at our headquarters in Mequon, Wisconsin. Our theme is “Making Stuff is Cool.”

We’ll host tours of our facilities to show our community what manufacturing is all about. Visitors will be able to interact with high tech equipment and highly skilled employees while they transform raw materials into everything from truck parts and wind turbine components to the retail displays that they see in department stores.

Not only will they witness manufacturing in real time, they will also see how much our team members enjoy the work that they do.

Manufacturer jobs are not what they used to be. It is no longer manual labor; it is technical work requiring a broad set of skills and the ability to understand lean manufacturing principles and advanced quality systems.

As technology continues to advance, manufacturing has evolved into a truly high tech industry. A stronger comprehension of math, excellent problem-solving skills, and computer literacy are essential. The next generation of manufacturing talent must be made up of the best and brightest students.

Manufacturing Day provides an important opportunity for us to help educate students – our workers of the future – on the full spectrum of diverse careers available in manufacturing. In addition to technical production-related careers, manufacturers need specialists in customer service, purchasing, marketing, information technology, and many other fields necessary to operate a successful business.

We at GenMet look forward to welcoming more than 350 students, teachers, and guidance counselors from the surrounding community to our facility. We view our Manufacturing Day events as an investment in the future of manufacturing and our economy.

I hope other manufacturers will consider hosting an event. Teachers, parents, and members of the public can use the Manufacturing Day site to find events in their area.

We couldn’t think of a better way to help people young and old understand what advanced manufacturing truly is than to have them see it for themselves in a real life, hands-on environment.

We want everyone to experience the feeling we have every day – that making stuff is really cool.

Thanks to all of you who are supporting American manufacturing, and happy Manufacturing Day!

h1

Developing Foreign Business is Easier than You Think

May 29, 2013
Cody Friesen is the founder of Fluidic Energy

Dr. Cody Friesen

Today on the Department of Commerce Blog, Dr. Cody Friesen discusses the recent infrastructure trade mission to Latin America. Missions like these are one way the Department of Commerce and the International Trade Administration (ITA) help U.S. businesses develop contacts and find export opportunities in expanding markets.

As Friesen points out, the barriers for a business looking to export are not as high as one might think. Services from ITA and the Department of Commerce can help your business find qualified buyers, conduct market research, and develop contacts in foreign markets.

One of our upcoming trade missions may be the next step for your company to find a new market overseas. You can read more of Dr. Friesen’s advice on the Department of Commerce Blog.

h1

Private Sector Council Provides Feedback on Manufacturing Initiatives

May 3, 2013

Michael Laszkiewicz is the Chair of the 2013 Manufacturing Council. He is the Vice President and General Manager of Rockwell Automation.File photo of workers building a car.

Innovation.

Workforce development.

Export promotion.

Greater support for small and medium-size manufacturers.

And most of all, competitiveness.

Those were the key issues that 23 representatives of the manufacturing community discussed in the initial meeting of the newly appointed 2013 Manufacturing Council, on which I serve as chairperson.

The Council is the principal private sector advisory committee to the Secretary of Commerce on the manufacturing industry. It is composed of representatives from large and small manufacturers from across the U.S., representing an array of industries ranging from automotive parts to chemicals to superconductors.

The Council will meet four times this year to advise the Secretary of Commerce on the challenges facing manufacturing, and provide input on the Obama Administration’s manufacturing initiatives.

As professionals in the field, we know and understand the issues affecting manufacturing. We care about the future of the manufacturing sector and we’re proud to have a voice to provide input on the Obama Administration’s initiatives.

While the issues we discussed aren’t new, we approach them with energy and enthusiasm, buoyed by the Administration’s renewed commitment to reinforce its efforts to strengthen U.S. manufacturing global competitiveness.

What do you think of the list of issues the Council is focusing on? If we could give the Administration one piece of advice on how to strengthen manufacturing, what should it be?

h1

The Manufacturing Council: A Public/Private Sector Partnership for Progress

January 20, 2012

Nicole Lamb-Hale is the Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing and Services within the International Trade Administration.

Every day, American manufacturers put together different parts to build great things.

Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing and Services Nicole Y. Lamb-Hale (center) with Commerce Secretary John E. Bryson (second from right) and Under Secretary for International Trade Francisco Sánchez (right) meet with the Manufacturing Council

Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing and Services Nicole Y. Lamb-Hale (center) with Commerce Secretary John E. Bryson (second from right) and Under Secretary for International Trade Francisco Sánchez (right) meet with the Manufacturing Council

Today, at the Department of Commerce’s Manufacturing Council meeting, different partners from the public and private sectors came together to do big things.  Specifically, we gathered with a simple goal: to support U.S. manufacturers.

Why is the manufacturing sector so important?  It’s because, historically, it has been a key to U.S. economic growth, provided a ticket to the middle-class for American workers, and been home to some of America’s greatest innovations.

Looking ahead, as Secretary Bryson recently told the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, “without a strong manufacturing base, we can’t create enough good jobs to sustain a strong middle class. And without a strong middle class, we cannot be a strong country.”

This is why supporting U.S. manufacturers is a priority for President Obama, Secretary Bryson, Under Secretary Sánchez, and all of us at the International Trade Administration.  We are committed to the manufacturing comeback.  And, thankfully, good things are happening.

334,000 manufacturing jobs have been created over the last two years.  In the third quarter of 2011, manufacturing profits were up more than 7 percent compared to the first quarter.

At ITA, we are committed to keeping this momentum going.  We do this in a variety of ways.

This includes:

  • Helping U.S. manufacturers reach new markets:

Only 1 percent of U.S. businesses export.  Of those that do, 58 percent export to only one market.  There is potential for U.S. manufacturers to do so much more.

With efforts like the New Market Exporter Initiative, we are working with private sector partners — like the National Association of Manufacturers— to provide U.S. businesses with the support they need to reach new markets and new customers.

  • Ensuring that U.S. manufacturers are competing on a level playing field:

American-made products represent quality.  All businesses need is a fair chance to sell their goods and services, and ITA is committed to giving them this equal opportunity.

We continue to enforce anti-dumping and countervailing duty laws.  In addition, whenever needed, our Advocacy Center is ready to reach out to foreign-governments to make the case on behalf of U.S. businesses.

  • Bringing customers to U.S. businesses:

At ITA, we know that in this 21st century economy, we’ve got to be creative in serving U.S. businesses.  With our International Buyers program, we administer a sort-of reverse trade mission initiative.

Every year, the ITA brings over 10,000 pre-qualified international buyers to U.S. trade shows.  We want U.S. products in front of as many customers as possible.  Why? Because sales impact profits.  And, profits lead to jobs.

We are doing this and so much more.  If your business needs help, I encourage you to go to export.gov and begin the process of selling your goods overseas — today.

On a personal note, helping U.S. businesses is important to me.  I’m from Detroit, which has a rich history of manufacturing.

I’ve seen how these industries can impact communities and lives.  And, all of us at the Department of Commerce are committed to ensuring that these sectors have this positive impact for years to come.

h1

June is Manufacturing Month

June 14, 2011

Cory Churches is a Communications and Outreach Specialist in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Public Affairs.

Did you know that June is manufacturing month? ITA has an entire division dedicated to supporting U.S. manufacturers, the Manufacturing and Services division. The trade specialists, economists, and highly knowledgable staff provide analysis and tools specifically to help manufacturers become and remain competitive. Below is a list of some of the progams and services companies can tap into to improve their competitiveness:

  • The Manufacturing Council advises the Secretary of Commerce on matters relating to the competitiveness of the Aircraft enginesmanufacturing sector, and government policies and programs that affect U.S. manufacturers. The Council is composed of up to 25 private sector representatives from a broad cross-section of the industry and include steel, textile, and superconductor manufacturers both large and small. Their products support a diverse range of industries such as the auto, aerospace, apparel and energy efficiency sectors.
  • The Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative (SMI) has developed tools and resources to help companies, particularly small and medium-sized enterprises, implement sustainable business practices faster and more effectively. The benefits to manufacturers include lower energy and resource costs, increased marketability of products and services and lower regulatory costs and risk.
  • Manufacturers will find the FTA Tariff Tool database helpful in determining the tariff, or tax at the border, that certain foreign countries will collect when products cross into their country. In trade agreements, countries commit to lowering tariff rates over time to zero. The FTA Tariff Data Tool is a database with all of the rates the United States’ Free Trade Agreement (FTA) or Trade Promotion Agreement (TPA) partners have committed to implementing and maintaining. Additionally, the database includes the tariff rates for Korea, Panama, and Colombia, although those trade agreements have not yet been implemented.
  • The Manufacturing Bi-Weekly highlights economic indicators, such as wage rates, profits, employment, production and productivity to give readers an overview of the state of the manufacturing sector.

The programs and services listed above are just an example of the sorts of assistance and support that the International Trade Administration can provide to manufacturers of all size.

h1

New Manufacturing Council Represents the “Next Generation of Manufacturing”

August 6, 2010

 Melanie Kaplan is an intern in the Office of Advisory Committees and entering her junior year at Wellesley College.

Hot off the press: the Secretary of Commerce has appointed twenty-four members to his Manufacturing Council. When I first heard that I would be working on the Manufacturing Council, I envisioned the traditional “Midwestern steel” companies. After a week of working on the Manufacturing Council, I realized that domestic steel producers were only one part of it with other types of manufactures representing a wide variety of U.S. industries.

Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke announces the appointment of 24 members of the Manufacturing Council

Secretary of Commerce Gary Locke (center) announces the appointment of 24 members of the Manufacturing Council

This spring, the Office of Advisory Committees did a nation-wide search for companies that would best represent the U.S. Manufacturing Sector. From small and medium enterprises (SME’s) to some of the largest manufacturing companies in the country, these companies will provide Secretary Locke with their unfiltered advice and expertise. The Manufacturing Council members announced by Secretary Locke yesterday afternoon at an official ceremony on Capitol Hill where the Secretary was joined by Senators Debbie Stabenow (MI), Sherrod Brown (OH), Jeff Merkley (OR) and Tom Udall (NM) represents the most diverse group of advisors in the Council’s history.  The members, the companies and the industry sectors they represent are:

Bruce Sohn,
President
First Solar, Inc., Chair (AZ)
Joseph B. Anderson, Jr.,
Chairman & CEO
TAG Holdings LLC, Vice Chair (MI)
Luis Arguello,
President
DemeTech (FL)
Greg Bachmann,
Chairman & CEO
Dymax Corporation (CT)
Richard M. Beyer,
Chairman & CEO
Freescale Semiconductor, Inc. (TX)
Chandra Brown,
President
Vice President
United Streetcar
Oregon Iron Works, Inc. (OR)
Daniel DiMicco,
Chairman & CEO
Nucor Corporation (NC)
Al Fuller,
Chief Executive Officer
Integrated Packaging Corporation (NJ)
Michael Gambrell,
Executive Vice President
The Dow Chemical Company (MI)
David W. Hastings,
Chairman & CEO
Mount Vernon Mills, Inc. (SC)
Mary Isbister,
President
GenMet (WI)
Kellie Johnson,
President
Ace Clearwater Enterprises (CA)
Fred Keller,
Chairman & CEO
Cascade Engineering (MI)
Samuel Landol,
Chief Operating Officer
Sealaska Corporation (AK/WA)
Michael Laszkiewicz,
Vice President & General Manager
Automation Power Control Business, Rockwell Automation, Inc. (WI)
Daniel P. McGahn,
President & COO
American Superconductor Corporation (MA)
James B. McGregor,
Vice Chairman
The McGregor Metalworking Companies (OH)
Stephen MacMillan,
President, CEO & Chairman
Stryker Corporation (MI)
David Melton,
President & CEO
Sacred Power Corporation (NM)
Jason W. Speer,
Vice President & General Manager
Quality Float Works, Inc. (IL)
Ward J. Timken,
Chairman
The Timken Company (OH)
Peter Ungaro,
Chairman & CEO
CRAY (WA)
Jane L. Warner,
Executive Vice President
Illinois Tool Works (IL)
Donna L. Zobel,
Chairman & CEO
Myron Zucker (MI)

Ex Officio Members:

  • Steven Chu, U.S. Secretary of Energy
  • Hilda L. Solis, U.S. Secretary of Labor
  • Timothy F. Geithner, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury

Many of the companies listed above are the first from their sectors… to be included on the Manufacturing Council. As an intern this summer, I helped the staffers to create a council that encouraged diversity, going green and an understanding of corporate responsibility. One of my favorite parts of the vetting process was seeing the innovative ways the companies gave back to their local, national and global communities. I was also inspired by one of the Manufacturing Council appointees who spoke with such fervor about the “next generation of manufacturing” and how it can and will contribute to U.S. global competitiveness.

Previous Manufacturing Councils have discussed energy costs and alternatives, sustainable manufacturing, tax credits for research and development, market access as well as a variety of other topics. In the upcoming meetings, the issue of credit access for SME’s and how to best allocate resources from American Investment & Recovery Act may be a few of the hottest topics. Additionally, the Manufacturing Council may be involved in Assistant Secretary Nicole Lamb-Hale’s manufacturing trade mission “Manufacture America: Rethink, Retool, Rebuild to Support Jobs” in Fall 2010. Stay tuned for more updates on the Manufacturing Council’s first official meeting scheduled for September 2010…

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 435 other followers