Posts Tagged ‘Washington’

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State Economies Get Boost from Exports

August 8, 2013

Calynn Jenkins is an intern in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Public Affairs. She is studying political science at American University. 

Seventeen states set export records in the first half of 2013, including Connecticut, Indiana, and Wisconsin.

Seventeen states set export records in the first half of 2013, including Connecticut, Indiana, and Wisconsin.

If your business is not exporting, you may be missing out on key opportunities to expand your business and increase your bottom line.

New data released from the International Trade Administration (ITA) on state exports from the first six months of 2013 shows U.S. merchandise exports totaled a record $781 billion. Oklahoma, Georgia, and North Carolina are among 17 states that reached record highs in merchandise exports.

Goods exports from Texas grew the most in dollar terms, rising from $4.3 billion to $134.4 billion. Washington (up $3.8 billion), New York (up $2.8 billion), Kentucky (up $1.4 billion), and Louisiana ($960 million) were the next largest.

Exports are an important driver of U.S. economic growth. Total merchandise exports from all 50 states contributed to a record $2.2 trillion in goods and services exports in 2012, which supported nearly 10 million jobs. According to new data from the first half of 2013, U.S. exports are on track for another record year.

The Obama administration has made exports a national priority, launching the National Export Initiative (NEI) in 2010 to support American jobs. Helping U.S. companies become more competitive internationally is a critical step to shaping an American economy built to last. The Department of Commerce and ITA are committed to continuing the trend of export growth.

More information about individual state contribution to national exports is available through the International Trade Administration’s Office of Trade and Industry Information web page.

If your business is ready to take advantage of opportunities overseas, ITA is here to support. We helped U.S. businesses achieve more than 14,000 export successes in 2012. Visit your local Export Assistance Center today.

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Reaching Out to U.S. Businesses to Do Business in Russia

June 10, 2013

Joe Wereszynski is an International Trade Specialist in the International Trade Administration’s Office of Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia. 

DAS Murray, Jim Ross CEO of Ross Laboratories, and Karen Taylor Seattle USEAC look at Ross Lab’s innovative marine technology while discussing market access opportunities.

Jim Ross of Ross Laboratories (center) demonstrates  some of Ross Labs’ marine technology for Karen Taylor of the Seattle Export Assistance Center and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Europe Matt Murray during a discussion of market access opportunities.

As we discussed last week, we at the International Trade Administration’s (ITA) Office of Russia, Ukraine and Eurasia have been working hard to tell American businesses about doing business in Russia. Since last year, we’ve held a series of webinars, visits and consultations to help businesses understand our new trade relationship.

We will also participate in this month’s International Economic Forum in St. Petersburg. This forum will have participants from around the world and one of the key focuses will be the importance of capitalizing on new opportunities.

We see the Russian market as a new opportunity for many businesses and are working hard to make sure our trade relationship stays on the right path and American businesses understand how to navigate it.

“Standards and conformity assessment barriers are the number one trade barrier by volume around the world,” says Deputy Assistant Secretary for Europe and Eurasia Matthew Murray. “We see clear value to getting ahead of these issues, identifying problems early, and making sure U.S. exporters are aware of the rights and resources at their disposal.”

Our team has given presentations on our evolving trade relationship with Russia, and how ITA can help businesses overcome trade barriers and do business with Russia.

One such presentation was in late September, on the margins of the 2012 Russian-America Pacific Partnership (RAPP) forum held in Tacoma, Washington. Mr. Murray spoke in a series of events and held one-on-one meetings with companies across the state.

Washington plays a vital state role in conducting foreign trade; it’s the 7th-largest state export volume and was the 5th largest state exporter to Russia. The state’s increase in exports to Russia from $247 million in 2010 to $445 million in 2011 directly supported over 1,400 American jobs.

During 2012 and 2013, our office helped to organize additional roundtable events with U.S. companies on the benefits of Russia’s WTO membership in eight cities including New York, Moscow and Boston. In June 2012 hosted a webinar that reached over 100 participates across the United States.

We continue to listen. If you want to learn how to do business in Russia, please contact your nearest Export Assistance Center for assistance. We look forward to helping American business sell their goods and services in Russia, taking advantage of our new trade agreement.

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Sustainable Manufacturing Tour

July 15, 2009

(This post contains external links.  Please review our external linking policy.)

Acting U.S. Commerce Assistant Secretary for Manufacturing and Services Mary Saunders is leading a tour of four Seattle-area manufacturing facilities as part of the department’s Sustainability 360 initiative. The tour, Sustainability 360: An Aerospace Supply Chain Event, is designed to showcase the benefits of sustainable manufacturing throughout an aerospace manufacturing supply chain.

Sustainability 360

We just concluded our first Sustainability 360 event here in Seattle and the experience was outstanding – lots of good practical examples of how implementing sustainable manufacturing practices can reduce environmental impact and improve the bottom line for businesses.  Sustainability 360 is what we are calling our regional tours of manufacturing facilities operating at various points in the supply chain, in this case the aerospace supply chain.  Our sustainable manufacturing and aerospace teams in Manufacturing and Services worked with the U.S.  Export Assistance Center and Washington Manufacturing Services, the Manufacturing Extension Partnership Center in the area, to put together a tour of four companies who are at various stages in their sustainability journey, to share their lessons learned and best practices with other local companies.

Participants visiting the new facility of Tyee Aircraft, a producer of aerospace components.  Tyee has incorporated sustainable principles into its lean manufacturing practices with zero waste water release, energy efficient lighting, and recycling programs.

Participants visiting the new facility of Tyee Aircraft, a producer of aerospace components. Tyee has incorporated sustainable principles into its lean manufacturing practices with zero waste water release, energy efficient lighting, and recycling programs. (U.S. Department of Commerce photo.)

We toured Puget Sound Energy, Tyee Aircraft, Goodrich Aerostructures and The Boeing Company, along with 24 local company representatives.  And we learned a tremendous amount.  For instances, successful companies are those that are “purpose driven”, with management and employees working toward a common goal.  Sustainability takes into account the interest of the company itself in becoming more competitive; as well as the interests of investors, suppliers, customers and the community in which it operates.  Ideas for improving sustainability can come from anyone in the company and even from suppliers and customers.  There are no bad ideas.  Sustainable Manufacturing practices save money and help grow business.

I have toured factory floors before, but I have never seen this much energy and enthusiasm, in companies ranging in size from a little more than a 100 employees to several thousand.  Today’s program reinforced the practical value of the departments’ Sustainable Manufacturing Initiative and the value of public-private partnership in advancing the competitiveness of U. S. industry.  What a hands on- way to spread the message to U.S. manufactures nationwide that sustainable manufacturing practices can deliver triple-win solutions that benefit U. S. firms, the communities in which they operate and the environment.

Mary Saunders giving her opening remarks for the Sustainability 360 event at utility Puget Sound Energy. PSE's 2008 energy efficiency work will result in annual savings for its customers of $30 million a year.

Mary Saunders giving her opening remarks for the Sustainability 360 event at utility Puget Sound Energy. PSE’s 2008 energy efficiency work will result in annual savings for its customers of $30 million a year. (U.S. Department of Commerce photo.)

Sustainable manufacturing is an area where the U.S. maintains a global competitive advantage.  Not only are we the largest producer of clean technologies globally, we are also a leader in creating cutting edge, lean and clean manufacturing practices throughout industry  supply chains.  I am looking forward to our continued work in helping to spread the sustainable manufacturing message nationwide.  For information on this initiative and its three components, take a look at http://www.manufacturing.gov/sustainability.  Let us know what you think.

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