Archive for the ‘Export Data’ Category

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ITA Releases Smart Cities Guide

July 14, 2016

Vinay Vijay Singh, Senior Advisor, Global Markets, Urbanization & Infrastructure

A successful economy lays the foundation for a successful city, but the city must be able to keep up with an evolving economy to maintain overall success. Global trends show the world is spending far less on infrastructure than is required to contend with the rapid pace of economic development. A Smart Cities movement has risen to address the forces of urbanization around the world.  The International Trade Administration’s (ITA) newly released Smart Cities, Regions & Communities Export Opportunities Guide highlights potential business opportunities for U.S. companies along with insights from other Commerce bureaus.

City

The Smart Cities initiative was created to target federal resources to meet the needs of local communities.

Cities have been the center for commerce since bartering and trade first began. Smart Cities is a development mission aiming to monitor and promote urban sustainability, environmental cleanliness, citizen engagement, governance and critical needs in education and healthcare. The growth of a city places demand on its municipal government to address urban challenges in sectors such as water, energy, transportation and connectivity. Each of these industries represents opportunities to foster business partnerships and bolster prosperity.

The recent $160 million investment in federal research by the White House is aimed to help local communities establish solutions to key problems faced, including traffic congestion, fueling economic growth, managing effects from climate change, fighting crime and improvement of city delivery systems. This initiative is part of the President’s commitment to target federal resources to meet local needs and by providing leadership at a national level, this initiative is just one example of a Smart Cities vision and a huge business opportunity. The ITA continues the Obama Administration’s level of engagement by offering The Smart Cities Guide as another tool for U.S. companies to help make these connections and further expand their global export solutions.

The Smart Cities Guide incorporates Department of Commerce intra-agency smart city initiatives by combining in-depth information for export opportunities into four main categories: Access to Capital, Trade Promotion, Industry Sectors and Internet of Things (IoT). Many bureaus in Commerce are lending their thought leadership to help U.S. cities and businesses find unique solutions to global urbanization issues. ITA’s primary focus in the Guide is to serve as a trade promotion resource for U.S. companies looking to interface with local partners and government officials in markets with export opportunities.

This is the first edition of The Smart Cities Guide and as the U.S. government synthesizes its efforts to continue to elevate U.S. industry leading capabilities in this space, the ITA will look to publish its second edition later this year.  Come join our global teams at Discover Global Markets: Building Smart Cities in Chicago, November 1-3, 2016, to further explore opportunities in the smart city space.  For more information on the U.S. government smart city initiatives or services offered by the ITA, please email the team at smartcities@trade.gov and follow me @SmartCitySingh.

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Jobs Supported by Exports 2014: Product and Industry

July 13, 2016

Chris Rasmussen, a Senior International Economist in the Office of Trade and Economic Analysis, is the Team Lead for Quantitative Analysis and the author of several publications on jobs supported by exports.

The International Trade Administration has released a report detailing the jobs supported by exports by specific product and also within individual industries. This report joins earlier work estimating total U.S. jobs supported by exports, jobs supported by state goods exports, and jobs supported by exports by destination.

When thinking about the relationship between exports and jobs the natural tendency is to focus on the workers employed in the industry that produces the final product that is exported.  For example, a statistic for U.S. exports of chemical products may conjure up images of workers employed in chemical plants wearing hardhats and other protective gear.

However, products are not produced in isolation from beginning to end in a single industry, with the production of any product generally requiring the use of inputs from other industries.   As a result of these interrelationships between industries in the production process, the export of a product will impact employment in multiple industries in addition to the industry that produced the export.

In the chemical products example, the production and export of those products will not only affect employment in the chemical industry but also employment in industries such as petroleum and coal products, transportation and other services whose products are used by the chemical industry.

By the same token, production and employment in the chemical industry will be impacted not only by the export of chemical products but also by the export of agricultural products and products made of plastic and rubber that use products from the chemical industry as inputs in their production.

This report uses data capturing these interrelationships to look at the impact of exports on employment throughout the supply chain.  This report finds that as a group, manufacturing industries have the highest share, 26 percent, of their employment supported by exports. The report further finds that although 59 percent of all export-supported jobs are supported by the export of goods, 68 percent of all export-supported jobs are jobs located within service industries.  In fact, the report indicates that for every job within manufacturing industries supported by the export of manufactured products there is there is also a job supported in service industries by the export of those manufactured products.

To read the entire report and other jobs-supported by exports materials, visit the OTEA website: http://www.trade.gov/mas/ian/employment.

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Just in Time for Hannover: Seven Top Markets Reports Released

April 14, 2016

Marcus Jadotte is ITA’s Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Industry & Analysis.

Earlier today, the International Trade Administration (ITA) released seven new Top Markets Reports to provide the latest assessment of export opportunities for U.S. companies that attend the world’s largest annual trade show for industrial technology: Hannover Messe 2016.

The Top Markets series is a collection of sector-specific reports that are designed to help U.S. exporters compare markets across borders, using market intelligence and data to inform decision-making. Providing new market intelligence, the reports related to the Hannover Messe pavilions and themes are:

Each Top Markets Report includes commentary on opportunities, trends, and challenges facing U.S. exporters in the largest potential markets. The reports combine the unique expertise of ITA’s sector leads in Industry & Analysis with economic data and the views of our staff stationed around the world. In addition to these seven new reports, more than a dozen other sector-specific reports are currently available on our top markets webpage. .New versions of these reports will be released later this year. The Top Markets Reports released today provide valuable market intelligence about future export opportunities, including Germany. Germany is ranked as a top 10 export market for industrial automation, manufacturing technology, cloud computing, aircraft parts, and automotive parts. Each of these reports has a separate case study devoted to the opportunities and challenges of exporting to Germany.

We hope you find these tools beneficial as you prepare for Hannover Messe. Once at the fair, our sector and country experts, including many of the authors of these reports, will be on the ground ready to speak with you about this market intelligence and connect you with buyer delegations and foreign attendees.

For the first time in the trade show’s history, the United States is the Partner Country at Hannover Messe. The more than 425 companies, economic development organizations, and U.S. universities, comprise the largest U.S. exhibitor delegation to Hannover. The show, which takes place April 25-29, 2016, typically hosts more than 200,000 attendees from 70 countries, and more than 2,500 members of the media. President Obama will be the first sitting U.S. President to participate in Hannover Messe, proving that support for the event comes from the highest levels of our government. We look forward to seeing you in two weeks!

Note: ITA will live tweet from the event. Follow us @TradeGov and join the conversation using #HM16USA.

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Jobs Supported by Exports 2015: An Update

April 8, 2016

Ellen Hughes-Cromwick is Chief Economist for the Department of Commerce 

Today, the International Trade Administration released its report titled “Jobs Supported by Exports 2015: An Update”, which found that the number of U.S. jobs supported by exports declined slightly in the face of significant headwinds from the global economic growth slowdown overseas.

However, exports continued to play an important role in supporting employment in the United States in 2015. Exports supported an estimated 11.5 million jobs in 2015, down less than 50,000 from the nearly 11.6 million jobs supported by exports in 2014.

Despite the decrease in export-supported employment last year, the number of jobs supported by exports is up 1.9 million since 2009, an increase of 19.8 percent.  The modest decline in export-related employment was largely associated with the decline in goods exports.  The BEA reported that in 2015, current dollar exports of goods and services fell slightly – from $2.34 trillion in 2014, to $2.22 trillion in 2015. However, employment related to services exports ticked up, increasing by more than 2,000 jobs as compared to 2014.

The report also indicates that the number of jobs supported by $1 billion in exports increased last year.  In 2015, every $1 billion in U.S. goods exports supported 5,279 jobs, up from 4,969 jobs in 2014. The number of jobs supported per $1 billion of services exports remained nearly constant in 2015.

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New Study: How Important is FDI to the U.S. economy?

February 24, 2016

Felicia Pullam is the Director of Outreach for SelectUSA.

The International Trade Administration (ITA) released a new study that quantifies the employment impact of foreign direct investment (FDI) in the United States. Economists from ITA’s Office of Trade and Economic Analysis estimate that 12 million jobs, or 8.5 percent of the entire U.S. labor force, were attributed to FDI.

Graph

Foreign direct investment

The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA), also within the U.S. Department of Commerce, conducts an intensive survey every year that measures the number of people employed by foreign companies, along with other information about their operations. According to their data, roughly 6.1 million people were directly employed by U.S. affiliates of majority foreign-owned companies in 2013 (the most recent year for which we have data). In other words, international companies like Siemens, Unilever, and Toyota have operations in the United States that employ American workers.

The economic impact of this foreign investment goes beyond the direct jobs. International companies help drive American innovation, connect American communities with the world, and bring new techniques to improve productivity. In 2013 alone, companies like Novartis, Michelin, and Samsung spent a whopping $53 billion on American research and development.  That same year, companies like Honda and L’Oréal, exported $360 billion worth of goods from the United States.

All of this direct economic activity generates additional motion in the local and national economy. For example, these companies rely on other companies within their supply chain.  The employees of these companies all earn income, which they can in turn spend at restaurants or on other goods for their families.  Employees are trained with new skills, which benefit them for the rest of their lives as they move on to future jobs.

L’Oréal, headquartered in France, directly employs more than 10,000 people in the United States, with facilities in 14 states. L’Oréal USA manufactures billions of dollars’ worth of products in the United States for American sales, while also exporting more than $500 million of finished product from the United States every year. To achieve this, L’Oréal USA sources many of its production-related purchases (e.g., packaging, raw materials, and subcontracts) from suppliers in our country, including companies like Stull Technologies, Inc., in New Jersey, and New York Label & Box Works.

Lufthansa Group, headquartered in Germany, directly employs 14,000 people across the United States. Its subsidiary, Lufthansa Technik, recently cut the ribbon on a world-class aircraft maintenance facility in Puerto Rico, employing 203 skilled workers (with plans to double in the next year).  But Lufthansa Technik’s local impact does not stop there – 140 more people are employed by other companies that provide Lufthansa with a variety of services, including Wasco, Genesis, Food Friends, Antilles, and Occupational Medical Services. This specific investment not only brings high-skilled jobs and workforce training to the community, it also establishes an important cornerstone for the local industry.

The landmark study released today, titled “Jobs Attributable to Foreign Direct Investment in the United States”, looks at these broader economic effects to estimate the larger impact.  Building on BEA’s data, the report uses the United States Applied General Equilibrium (USAGE) model to conservatively estimate the total number of jobs attributable to FDI through two channels.

The first channel includes 2.4 million jobs in supply and distribution chains related to foreign-owned enterprises and jobs stimulated by increased incomes. The second channel includes 3.5 million jobs attributable to productivity growth in manufacturing associated with FDI. In total, the report estimates that, in addition to 6.1 million direct jobs, at least 5.9 million indirect jobs also rely on FDI, totaling 12 million jobs.

This result shows clearly that FDI continues to be important to the U.S. economy. The United States is home to more foreign investment than any other country, and there are still opportunities to attract more. The SelectUSA program, also housed within ITA, offers services to foreign companies and U.S. economic development organizations to facilitate this investment.  Topics that are directly related to the economic effects discussed in the report, such as innovation, advanced manufacturing, and workforce development, will be on the agenda for the SelectUSA Investment Summit, coming up in June 2016.

View the full report 

 

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Expanding Small Business Owners’ Access to Our Data with Census Business Builder

September 10, 2015

This post originally appeared on the U.S. Census Bureau’s Director’s BlogThis post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Map Depicting Employer Establishments in Fairfax County, Virginia

Map Depicting Employer Establishments in Fairfax County, Virginia

The U.S. Census Bureau is the premiere source of data about America’s economy and businesses, and we’re committed to making our data more accessible than ever before. I’m pleased to introduce our latest tool in that effort: Census Business Builder: Small Business Edition.

Every day, businesses large and small use Census Bureau data to make important decisions. Large companies have sophisticated research staff to do this work for them, but small business owners are often left to their own devices. We’ve talked to many entrepreneurs across the country, and a common request is for more Census Bureau data in an easier-to-use format. We listened, and in response, we developed Census Business Builder: Small Business Edition to provide them with easier access to more data.

Census Business Builder: Small Business Edition combines economic and demographic data in meaningful ways that are useful to the small business owner. Uniquely, Census Business Builder also uses third party data on consumer spending. While not produced by Census, we believe that the addition of this data will help deliver the information that’s most useful for small business owners’ needs. The result is an innovative data tool that will help small business entrepreneurs determine the best type and location for their small business.

To start, select your business type from a list of over 40 categories – such as a restaurant, construction company or beauty salon – and where you’re considering setting up shop.

Once you input this information, you see a map view of your selected location (county, city, town or ZIP code), along with relevant demographic, economic and housing characteristics for that area’s residents. You can pull up features of other businesses like yours – such as number of establishments or similar businesses, average payroll and consumer spending. You can also add filters in order to see cities, counties and neighborhoods with their potential customers’ desired income, education, poverty and employment characteristics.

The combination of economic and demographic data allows small business owners to make an informed decision about what type of business to open and where to locate it. Once you’ve gathered all of the information you want, Census Business Builder generates a detailed report on the characteristics of your desired geography, its residents and businesses. This critical information can be incorporated into a business plan, a business loan application or shared with others.

Census Business Builder increases the availability and usefulness of the statistics the Census Bureau collects, and it’s a valuable tool for small business owners across America. This is the latest in the Census Bureau’s digital transformation effort, along with major upgrades to Census.gov, an expanding open API, mobile apps and other interactive data tools.

We hope you visit Census Business Builder and give us your thoughts via the feedback button. Ideas for improvements to future versions of the tool will come from you, the user.

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Update to Important Commerce Data Tool Helps Businesses Improve their Export Services and Stay Compliant

August 6, 2015

This post originally appeared on the Department of Commerce blog.

Kimberly J.C. Becht is Deputy Director of Web Presence for the International Trade Administration

Staying compliant is an extremely important component to exporting. In 2010, the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) accepted the Export Control Reform (ECR) Initiative mandate to create and publish the Consolidated Screening List (CSL). The CSL is a list of names or entities (individuals and organizations) with whom a U.S. company may not be allowed to do business with due to U.S. export regulations, sanctions, or other restrictions. BIS worked with the International Trade Administration (ITA) to create an ECR section on export.gov , where the business community could download the CSL as a text file. Every month, thousands of companies stay compliant by checking the CSL to determine if any of the parties in their overseas transactions are on it.

ITA's CSL application programming interface (API)

Screenshot of ITA’s CSL application programming interface (API)

In 2014, ITA “opened” the CSL data by publishing the CSL application programming interface (API). An API, or data feed, enables any web developer or software engineer to access the data in the CSL and integrate it into their own application. Major e-commerce sites, international shippers, and compliance software companies now use the CSL API every day to improve their services and help their customers stay compliant.

“Fuzzy Name Search” Improves Compliance for U.S. Companies

Based on requests from these companies, from ITA customers, and from export compliance experts, ITA has just released a new version of the CSL API that introduces “Fuzzy Name Search.” Fuzzy Name Search enables a company to search the CSL without knowing the exact spelling of an entity’s name.

This is particularly helpful when searching for names on the CSL that have been transliterated into English from non-Romance languages. Imagine doing business with individuals that have Cyrillic names:  it’s much easier to search the CSL for those names if you are not required to have the spelling exactly right.

Fuzzy Name Search works by including results that exactly match or nearly match the name that is searched and assigning a “score” to those results. Search results are then prioritized by score – the higher the score, the closer the match, so the higher the name appears in the search results. ITA uses Damerau–Levenshtein distance to calculate the score.

Find Entities More Easily With the Current CSL Tools

ITA has also updated the format of the two original text files containing the CSL that companies download from export.gov. If your company downloads these files on an ongoing basis, there are two changes to be aware of that accommodate how the information is now organized.

First, all of the information for an entity is contained in a single row, not multiple rows if the entity has several addresses or alternate names. Second, there are five new fields that provide information found on an entity’s ID such as Nationality and Place of Birth. Please visit the new CSL page on export.gov to get more detailed information.

Finally, to do a quick search for an entity, visit the new CSL search page on export.gov. Search any or all of the lists at once, turn fuzzy name search on or off, and restrict your searches to a particular set of countries.  It’s easy and it’s fast.

ITA continues to open data that helps U.S. companies that are starting to export or looking to expand into new overseas markets. Please provide your feedback on ways we can improve the many APIs we have available.

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