Archive for the ‘U.S. Commercial Service’ Category

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New Mexico Exporter Brings Clean Water to World Markets

May 16, 2019

This blog post originally appeared on Thomas.  

Curt Cultice is a Senior Communications Specialist for the International Trade Administration.

Growing up in Waco, Texas, Stan Lueck always had a knack for environmental science, especially soil and water.

He pursued his career interest in the late 1970s and early 80s by earning a Bachelor of Science degree at Baylor University, and then undertook graduate studies in chemical engineering at the University of Texas at Arlington. Following his passion, he continued to hone his expertise as a technical professional, engineer, and entrepreneur.boat

“Our family lived on a rural farm raising cattle and hay, which gave me great exposure to science and mechanics — something that I’ve always had an interest in,” Lueck says. “After my college studies, I worked for an environmental consulting company, but after a few years, I thought, why not go bigger by starting my own business?”

After starting one business in the early 1990s, opportunity came knocking again when Lueck founded RODI Systems in 1995. As president of the Aztec, New Mexico-based firm, he grew the business, molding the company into a worldwide leader in the design and fabrication of high-performance water treatment systems.

Today, his firm supplies world markets with its technologies, and a product line featuring large, high-end water treatment systems, and smaller testing units. A large portion of the company’s business is seawater desalination treatment technology and portable self-contained treatment systems housed in intermodal shipping containers.

“For me, the real passion is to be able to build things, make them work, and send the equipment halfway around the world,” Lueck says. “At the same time, we’re also contributing to the quality of people’s lives by giving them access to clean drinking water. So, it’s a very fulfilling job.”

Export Help from the U.S. Commercial Service

RODI’s first foray into exporting began in the late 1990s. In more recent years, the firm has stepped up its export expansion, increasing its global presence in the developing world by targeting municipal governments and industrial users in markets throughout Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America – places where the need is especially prevalent.

However, successful exporting often depends on overcoming initial challenges, as Lueck can attest.

“One of the ongoing issues we faced in expanding our export sales was mitigating potential risk,” he says. “We were looking for advice and assistance in answering questions which would arise. It was about that time—about five or six years ago—that we received a call from Robert Queen.”

At the time, Queen had just stepped in as the new director of the U.S. Commercial Service in New Mexico. His office is part of the global network of the U.S. Commercial Service that helps U.S. companies export. This network includes 100+ offices across the United States and in more than 75 countries.

Starting with that phone call, Queen was reaching out to businesses and looking to see how he might assist Lueck with his export planning.

Says Queen, “Our assistance to Stan has ranged from finding out the best infrastructure trade leads and events to pursue, to checking out potential foreign partners — all of which requires due diligence.

“For example, in researching a lead Stan had found on the website, we discovered the buyer’s address was false. As a result, we helped Stan avoid a potentially costly mistake. Stan has also sought guidance on ensuring that shipping and logistics go smoothly without delay.”

Queen says he takes a collaborative approach to export assistance by engaging with his domestic colleagues or trade experts at U.S. embassies abroad, who have an ear to the ground in their respective markets. He says a large share of inquiries from exporters involves assistance in resolving trade problems, which may arise during the export process.

However, careful export planning in advance is key to minimize potential problems. RODI exports range anywhere from two to four high-end units a year worth upwards of more than $1,000,000 each, so, as Queen says, “we work with Stan to get it right the first time.”

In addition to his business clients being just a phone call or email away from help, about once each quarter Queen hits the road, driving hundreds of miles across New Mexico to visit rural-based business clients such as RODI, which might otherwise not have easy access to face-to-face export counseling. This is just one example of how the Commercial Service continues to extend its reach into traditionally underserved rural areas.

“Checking with the Commercial Service ahead of time gives us a presence in foreign countries when we don’t have one,” said Lueck. “It can be incredibly difficult and expensive for us to do on our own, and we might have to travel, so it’s a huge cost and time savings. Just recently, we were told that an overseas project we wanted to pursue was not what it appeared to be.”

More Export Sales, More Company Growth  

Leveraging U.S. Commercial Service export advice, trade show support, market intelligence, and other outside resources, Lueck sees new export opportunities on the horizon and is moving ahead with greater confidence.

He also says that without exports, his company wouldn’t be where it is today, with sales to more than 40 markets — including countries such as Indonesia, South Africa, Brazil, India, Sri Lanka, Oman, Canada, and Kuwait, to name a few.

“Exports now account for 80% of our overall sales, more than doubling from just a few years ago,” he says. “As a result, we’ve been able to boost the bottom line, sustain a steady workforce of 14 employees, and recently tripled the size of our production yard here in Aztec.”

Lueck also encourages those U.S. businesses that have not yet exported or may be selling to only one or two markets, to consider their export potential.

“I would say it’s something you should definitely look into,” he says. “It’s a bit of a learning curve, but the potential rewards are well worth it — and the Commercial Service is available to assist.”

Taking Advantage of Resources

The federal government’s export assistance portal offers digital support and additional resources; it can also help users locate local and overseas U.S. Commercial Service offices.

Also helpful are the Exporting Basics video series, which reviews all steps involved in the exporting process and outlines the available export resources, and the Country Commercial Guides, which offer the latest market intelligence on more than 140 markets.

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U.S. Commercial Service: Connecting Exporters with Resources Necessary for Global Success

February 13, 2019

Susan Crawford is part of the U.S. Commercial Service’s Integrated Strategic Communications Team focused on showcasing America’s Export Experts and bringing to light useful and publicly available export insights.

When doing business globally, it’s all about who you know:

  • Who can help determine the most promising markets for your product or service?
  • Who can introduce you to potential foreign buyers or distributors?
  • Who can answer a myriad of export-related questions ranging from financing options to shipping documentation?

If you were one of the more than 330 U.S. exporters from 36 states who attended the U.S. Commercial Service’s Discover Global Markets: Indo-Pacific business forum in Salt Lake City, Utah, you likely walked away with valuable connections to help you expand your exports into Indo-Pacific markets.

The U.S. Commercial Service, the export promotion arm of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration, recently hosted its 18th Discover Global Markets business forum to provide U.S. firms with access to the expert resources needed to identify and capitalize on growth opportunities in aerospace, defense and security sectors in the Indo-Pacific region.

Gil Kaplan

Under Secretary Gil Kaplan speaks to participants at the Discover Global Markets Forum

Indo-Pacific Market Opportunities

“There is great potential for U.S. companies to expand their presence in the Indo-Pacific and find ways to contribute their expertise, technical know-how and innovative technologies to help this region achieve its ambitious economic development goals,” Under Secretary of Commerce Gilbert Kaplan said in keynote remarks at the Discover Global Markets forum.

Markets in the Indo-Pacific region can present many exciting, new opportunities for U.S. firms. In 2017, the Indo-Pacific represented 33 percent of world GDP and the U.S. conducted more than $1.8 trillion in two-way trade with the region. The U.S. has an unmatched network in the region, as five of the United States’ seven treaty alliances are located there: Australia, Japan, Philippines, the Republic of Korea and Thailand, making it a potentially lucrative market for U.S. goods and services.

“Our U.S. commercial diplomats and U.S. Commercial Service international trade specialists are here to provide market intelligence on opportunities for your company; by introducing you to potential business partners and helping you develop strategies to conquer your next export market,” Kaplan said.

Making Valuable Global Connections

In fact, U.S. commercial diplomats based in 14 Indo-Pacific countries, including Australia, Burma, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Philippines, Japan, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam participated in the event.  The diplomats, together with our U.S.-based international trade specialists, shared their local business advice and industry expertise in one-on-one counseling sessions with American companies.

Meetings

Commercial Service International Trade Specialist meet with U.S. companies

Ron Gividen, of Selex Galileo, Inc., participated in the event and said, “It was timely to meet and receive ‘in-country’ connected key influencer help across all of Indo-Asia in a single location, and in literally just 2 ½ days of in-person, direct interviews.  The knowledge of each key person representing their respective country helped to make our time so much more valuable.  All combined to help create definite connected ‘next steps’ for increasing future opportunities.”

U.S. exporters also had the chance to meet with 22 foreign buyers from 7 countries who attended the conference to source American-made products and services including aircraft components, airport terminal equipment, advanced materials, border security equipment and cybersecurity solutions.

Additionally, the U.S. Commercial Service connected representatives from Boeing, GE Additive and Textron Systems with U.S. SMEs at the event who could support the OEMs’ global supply chains and major projects in the Indo-Pacific region.

During the 2 ½ day conference, attendees heard from more than 30 speakers including executives from The Boeing Company, FedEx Express, GE Additive, Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company, Moog Inc. Aircraft Group, and the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. There were also numerous opportunities for attendees to network with speakers, our commercial diplomats and international trade specialists, and fellow exporters.

Recognizing Successful U.S. Exporters

At a forum designed to provide companies with tools to expand exports, recognizing firms that are committed to exporting and have succeeded in growing their exports was a fitting addition. U.S. Commercial Service National Director of U.S. Operations Thomas McGinty presented an Export Achievement Certificate to the following two firms for significant and sustained export sales:

  • Palo Alto, California-based Space Systems Loral, a Maxar Technologies company, and provider of satellites and spacecraft systems; and
  • Boise, Idaho-based Black Sage Technologies, a counter-unmanned aircraft systems integrator.

McGinty also recognized the World Trade Center Utah for encouraging and supporting local exporters.

Next Steps

If you are interested in exploring opportunities in the Indo-Pacific region, I encourage you to consider joining us for Trade Winds 2019 which will take place on May 6-13, 2019 in New Delhi, India, with additional stops in Bangladesh and Sri Lanka. Trade Winds is the U.S. Department of Commerce’s largest trade mission of the year. Visit the Trade Winds website for more information.

For additional information about the Indo-Pacific and other markets, check out our series of Country Commercial Guides.

 

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Pacific Islands Opportunities: First Stop Papua New Guinea

August 22, 2018

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

This is the first entry in a series of guest blogs highlighting ITA activities that help connect U.S. companies to opportunities in the Indo-Pacific region following the recent Indo-Pacific Business Forum where Secretary Ross, Secretary Pompeo and other cabinet officials spoke about the Administration’s commitment to the region.

Guest Blog Q & A with U.S. Ambassador to Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands and Vanuatu, Catherine Ebert-Gray.

ITA: Tell us a little about the Pacific Islands, particularly Papua New Guinea (PNG), and its strategic importance.

headshot of Catherine Ebert-Gray

U.S. Ambassador to Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu, Catherine Ebert-Gray

Ambassador Ebert-Gray:  The Pacific Islands are increasingly responsible and democratic nations with an emerging middle class and growing potential for tourism, investment, and development.  Their diverse cultures, rainforests, pristine seas, natural resources, and beauty make them attractive to intrepid travelers and businesses.   The United States has a long and proud history in the Pacific that I’m honored to represent.  Increasingly, we are seeing non-traditional partners such as China working with Pacific Island countries.  It’s important for the United States government and the American business community remain engaged and active in the region as the economies and interests of the Indo-Pacific grows.  PNG is hosting the Asian Pacific Economic Forum in 2018, which represents 21 of the regional economics, 47 percent of global trade, and 57 percent of global GDP.   As Americans, we have tremendous advantages and goodwill which we should leverage to preserve and build strong relations.

ITA: What kind of export opportunities are there for U.S. companies to explore?

Ambassador Ebert-Gray:  While Solomon Islands and Vanuatu are countries with stable and growing economies, Papua New Guinea is by far the largest.  With a land area the size of Oregon or Sweden and a population the size of Michigan, New Jersey, Switzerland, or Israel, it is a market with tremendous potential.  Historically, PNG mostly exported minerals and agricultural products.  That changed in 2014 when ExxonMobil completed construction and began operation of the $19 billion PNG LNG project that exports liquefied natural gas to Asian markets.  Following that success, other oil and gas companies, including French supermajor, Total, are active in PNG working to bring future projects online.

American products and services have been integral to the success of resource projects throughout PNG’s history.  Power is generated by GE turbines or Cummins generators.  Earth is moved with Caterpillar equipment.  The employees take a break to enjoy a cold Coca-Cola.  I see future energy and other extractive projects as ripe targets for American business.  Right now, American companies have been most interested in healthcare and medical products, resource development equipment, electrical generation both traditional and renewable, and increasingly consumer electronics as Pacific Islanders have rapidly moved online.

ITA: How should interested U.S. companies start exploring?

“Representatives of the Lae Chamber of Commerce welcome Ambassador Ebert-Gray and the familiarization tour delegates. Lae is the second largest city in Papua New Guinea.”

Representatives of the Lae Chamber of Commerce welcome Ambassador Ebert-Gray and the familiarization tour delegates. Lae is the second largest city in Papua New Guinea.

Ambassador Ebert-Gray:  They should give us a call, send us an email, or stop by the embassy in Port Moresby!  My team and I love to hear from American businesses who are interested in the region.  We’ve been able to help companies as diverse as fire engine manufacturer exporting for airport improvement projects in PNG to a self-employed American looking to provide consulting services on an Asian Development Bank water project in the Solomon Islands.  To formalize our work, my embassy signed a Post Partnership agreement with the Department of Commerce.  The agreement allows my economic team to offer the full suite of Commercial Service products and services overseas for American companies.  Further, and just as importantly, it allows us to plug in to the terrific network at Commerce to get the resources and assistance we might need.  A capstone to this work will be an American business familiarization trip this August.  We have partnered with the American Chamber of Commerce in Australia and the Commercial Service’s office in Australia.  I’m very excited to welcome American companies to my beautiful, exciting, and opportunity-filled part of the world.

If companies are looking for a bit more information on Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu, I would recommend the following resources online.

ITA is proud to connect U.S. companies to opportunities in the Indo-Pacific region. If you are interested in how ITA can help you access Asian markets, contact your local International Trade Specialist.

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Top 5 Reasons Your FinTech Company Should Join Our Roadshow to Brazil

August 3, 2018

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Paul Frost is a U.S. Commercial Service Commercial Officer and currently serves as Deputy Team Leader for the Global Financial Services Team.

Graphic showing architecture unique to Brazil announcing the Brazil Fintech Roadshow from September 17-19, 2018.

According to Finnovista, an impact platform improving access to digital finance through the acceleration and cross-pollination of ideas, organizations and emerging talents, Brazil is home to the largest number of FinTech startups in Latin America. Highlighting this trend, the U.S. Commercial Service is partnering with Finnovista and PHM International to host a certified Trade Mission for U.S. investors, incubators, and FinTech companies in São Paulo, Brazil on September 17-19, 2018.

The FinTech Roadshow to Brazil provides an excellent opportunity for U.S. firms to promote their business and connect with leading companies in Brazil’s FinTech and financial sectors. U.S. participants will have the opportunity for several one-on-one meetings with executives from pre-qualified, vetted Brazilian FinTech and financial companies, startups, insurance companies, and other relevant institutions.

Brazil is #1 in Latin America for money transfers and savings, and has seen 188 new startups in the past 18 months. If that isn’t enough to get you thinking about doing business in Brazil, check out our top five benefits for joining this Certified Trade Mission:

  1. Meet one-on-one in private, pre-qualified meetings with companies convened by the U.S. Consulate

The same level of meetings would likely require a minimum of two to three trips to meet the same number of high-level professionals. This is a major advantage and a significant savings in time, expenses and opportunity cost. And as the old adage goes: “Time is Money.”

  1. Full contact information on all qualified Brazilian attendees

There is a cost in time and energy involved in identifying prospects, securing contact information, contacting prospects, convincing them to meet and then coordinating the schedule in an efficient manner. A major benefit to the FinTech Roadshow trade mission is that everything takes place in one day and all  pre-qualified and vetted Brazilian FinTech companies come to you.

  1. Briefing by U.S. Embassy and Brazilian experts

The U.S. Consulate is the “convener of stature” for the FinTech Roadshow to Brazil trade mission which lends a prestige to the event, helps guarantee the quality of the attendees, and limits the attrition prior to the event.

  1. No commissions or sales generated from Trade Mission

There are no commissions charged on any deal – investment, partnership, or sale you generate from the trade mission – ever.

  1. Last, but not least, a networking reception at the U.S. Consulate General Residence in São Paulo

This speaks for itself. You will have the opportunity to network with the movers and shakers, i.e., key decision makers in your industry.

For more information on the FinTech Roadshow to Brazil, to register for the event, and for sponsorship opportunities, please visit: www.phmintl.com/brazil-roadshow or contact Paul.Frost@trade.gov.

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Medical Device Regulations are Changing in Canada and the EU, Prepare Now to Maintain Market Access

June 11, 2018

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Susan Crawford is the communications specialist for the U.S. Commercial Service’s Global Healthcare Team. The U.S. Commercial Service is the trade promotion arm of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration.

Webinar: Preparing for the MDSAP

Date:  June, 28, 2018
Time: 
2:00 – 3:00 p.m. EDT
Registration:
https://go.usa.gov/xQVSh
More Information:
Connie.Irrera@trade.gov

Healthcare regulations are changing in major medical device export markets including Canada and the European Union (EU), and the U.S. Commercial Service (CS) Global Healthcare team is helping to inform U.S. companies about these changes and ensure that exporters have the resources they need to access these important markets.

Canada is launching a new Medical Device Single Audit Program (MDSAP) and all medical devices in Canada must be deemed safe and effective, including software accompanying any medical device. As of January 1, 2019, only MDSAP certificates will be accepted. Therefore, exporters will need to register under the new program to maintain the ability to sell medical devices in Canada in 2019.

The MDSAP Consortium includes Australia, Brazil, Canada, Japan, and the United States; however, Canada’s Medical Devices Regulations (SOR/98-282) are unique from other regions covered by the MDSAP Consortium in that it is currently the only one that will use MDSAP certificates to make determinations on Class II, III, and IV devices licenses. As Health Canada notes, “All manufacturers must transition from CMDCAS to MDSAP certificates to meet the quality management system requirements of the Medical Devices Regulations.”

To assist exporters with understanding the new regulation, the Global Healthcare Team is holding a webinar about MDSAP registration and requirements on June 28, 2018, featuring Frédéric Hamelin, Manager of the Quality Systems Section of the Medical Devices Bureau at Health Canada. To register for the webinar, please click here: https://go.usa.gov/xQVSh. For more information, contact Canada-based CS Commercial Specialist Connie Irrera at Connie.Irrera@trade.gov.

Medical regulations have already changed in the EU regarding the treatment of healthcare IT applications, post-market surveillance and liabilities borne by manufacturers. The new Regulation 2017-745 took effect in May 2017, and is the master regulation with which all imported medical devices will need to comply. The new rules will apply after a transitional period which will be three years after entry into force for the Regulation on medical devices (spring 2020), and five years after entry into force (spring 2022) for the Regulation on in vitro diagnostic medical devices, according to the EU Commission.

CS Global Healthcare Team Acting Director Taylor Little (CS New Hampshire) and team members David Edmiston (CS Minneapolis, MN) and Melissa Grosso (CS Middletown, CT) are educating U.S. firms and colleagues about these upcoming regulatory changes and the potential impact on U.S. medical device exports. The three international trade specialists recently completed the Regulatory Affairs Certificate Program in Medical Devices from the Regulatory Affairs Professional Society (RAPS), the largest global organization for those involved with the regulation of healthcare and related products.

“We want to prevent a situation in which a small company loses access to an export market because they were not aware of impending regulatory changes,” Little said.

For more information about the CS Global Healthcare Team, visit our website and click here to find a healthcare trade specialist near you.

 

Resources for Exporters

The U.S. Commercial Service Global Healthcare Team offers a variety of resources to educate exporters about market opportunities and trends for healthcare-related products and services.

Global Healthcare Team Website: https://2016.export.gov/industry/health/

Health Technologies Resource Guide: https://2016.export.gov/industry/health/healthcareresourceguide/eg_main_083726.asp 

Top Markets Series Reports

Additional Resources

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Women in International Trade, District Export Council, U.S. Department of Commerce Team Up for Program on Women Seizing New Opportunities with Africa

May 2, 2018

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

This is a guest blog submitted by the Association of Women in International Trade, Washington, DC.

Photo of participants from the Women Seizing New Opportunities with Africa: Driving U.S.-Africa Exports, Investment and Partnerships panel posing with Assistant Secretary for Global Markets and Director General of the U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service Erin Walsh. The diverse panel featured voices from public and private, U.S. and African, and for-profit and non-profit companies.

Participants from the Women Seizing New Opportunities with Africa: Driving U.S.-Africa Exports, Investment and Partnerships panel pose with Assistant Secretary for Global Markets and Director General of the U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service Erin Walsh. The diverse panel featured voices from public and private, U.S. and African, and for-profit and non-profit companies.

On March 15, the Association of Women in International Trade (WIIT) and the Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT), in partnership with the Virginia/Washington, DC District Export Council (DEC) and the U.S. Department of Commerce’s U.S. Commercial Service, Northern Virginia office, hosted a program on U.S.-Africa partnership and women’s economic empowerment.

Women Seizing New Opportunities with Africa: Driving U.S.-Africa Exports, Investment and Partnerships was held in connection with International Women’s Day, and highlighted growing opportunities for women-owned businesses to expand their export bases into Africa.

U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross delivered the opening remarks, and Assistant Secretary for Global Markets and Director General of the U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service Erin Walsh moderated the subsequent panel discussion, featuring voices from public and private, U.S. and African, and for-profit and non-profit companies.

Addressing the roughly 150 guests in attendance, Secretary Ross shared his insights on the growing opportunities for women-owned business to go global. He specifically advocated for women to take advantage of the exciting opportunities that exist for American businesses to find new markets and effectively compete in Africa.

Following Secretary Ross’s remarks, Assistant Secretary Walsh opened the panel discussion, congratulating the Washington, D.C. WIIT for celebrating its 30-year anniversary in 2017. She noted that only 12 percent of U.S. exporters are women-owned, compared to 20 percent of exporters worldwide. Further, only one percent of all U.S. SMEs export overseas.

“We must change these statistics,” Walsh said.

The following people participated in the panel discussion:

  • E. Arikana Chihombori-Quao, Permanent Representative of the African Union Representational Mission to the United States;
  • Mary Bezzini, President of Godman Power Group, Inc.;
  • Mucha Mlingo, President of OWIT Nairobi;
  • Thione Niang, Founder of the Give1Project;
  • Florie Liser, President & CEO, Corporate Council on Africa.

Interested in Exporting to Africa?

If you are considering entering or expanding into African markets, there are many ways in which the Department of Commerce’s U.S. Commercial Service can help you achieve your goals.

Country commercial guides are available for most African countries. To talk to someone locally about exporting, contact the U.S. Commercial Service in your area.

You can also use the U.S. Commercial Service to help you develop an export strategy and promote your brand for targeted African countries.

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Are you Export Savvy? Get the Edge on Exporting with New Export.gov Resources

April 19, 2018

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

By Curt Cultice, Senior Communications Specialist, and Jennifer Stone Marshall, Senior International Trade Specialist, U.S. Commercial Service

Logo for Export.gov's new email service, Export Today.Setting your compass in international trade can be rewarding, but challenging. Are you wondering “What is my firm’s potential for international sales?” or “How do I find greater success abroad?” We have two new online tools that can help you chart a course: export.gov’s exporter (self) assessments and export business tip emails.

Exporter Assessments Point the Way Forward

The U.S. Commercial Service’s exporter assessments can help improve your export planning while pointing to helpful resources. With expert input from our global network of trade professionals, the quick and easy-to-use assessments are customized to different levels of experience: new-to-export companies, exporters expanding into new markets, or experienced exporters in more challenging markets.

There are many questions to consider. Here is a brief overview of questions that are answered in the assessments:

  • Does your firm have sufficient production capacity that can be committed to the export market?
  • Does your company have capabilities to modify ingredients and product packaging to meet foreign import regulations, cultural preferences, and survive competition?
  • Will financing be required for any expansion?
  • Has your business considered pursuing U.S. free trade agreement countries as part of a broader export strategy?
  • Is your company familiar with U.S. Department of Commerce resources to help resolve trade issues and problems?

Moreover, each assessment provides important links to additional information, including the informative Exporting Basics videos series.

New “Export Today” Emails Give You Tips for Success

To continue developing your exporting competency, subscribe to our new email tip service, Export Today. You will receive biweekly emails from the U.S. Commercial Service, and get pointers on exporting issues relevant to your company’s experience level. Whether it’s shipping issues, trade finance assistance, researching the market, or a separate issue, Export Today will provide you with insights and connect you with the best content on export.gov. Sign up today.

Get Started Today on Export.gov

With our decades of experience in helping U.S. companies sell abroad, we bring you the most useful information and tools on export.gov. Companies that take the time to think through an export plan tend to have greater international success. The effort can make the difference between generating a few international sales and achieving real business growth. Get export savvy and on the path to new export sales by taking your own exporter assessment and signing up for Export Today email tips.