Archive for the ‘World Trade Month’ Category

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President’s “E” Awards Recognize the Importance of Exporting To “Main Street” America

May 19, 2015

This post originally appeared on the Department of Commerce blog.

U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker Presents U.S. Companies with President's "E" Award for Export Success

U.S. Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker Presents U.S. Companies with President’s “E” Award for Export Success

Today, U.S. Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker honored 45 American companies and organizations at the 2015 President’s “E” Awards ceremony.  The President’s “E” Award is the highest recognition any U.S. entity can receive for making a significant contribution to the expansion of U.S. exports.

Exports are critical to spurring economic growth and job creation and this year, 26 companies were honored with the “E” Award for Exports for demonstrating a sustained increase in export sales over a four-year period. This year’s ceremony also honored, twelve companies with the “E” Award for Export Service for their work assisting and facilitating export activities, and another four firms received the “E” Star Award for Exports, which recognizes previous “E” Award winners who have reported four years of increased export growth. Secretary Pritzker also awarded three companies with the “E” Star Award for Export Service, which recognizes previous “E” Award winners that have shown four years of continued support of exporters since first winning the “E” Award.

Winners of the 2015 “E” Awards represent diverse communities in 20 states across the country including Van Nuys, Calif.; Edina, Minn.; Gilbert, Ariz.; Chicago, Ill.; Sanford, Fla.; and Ellington, Conn. Among the awardees were 35 small- and medium-sized businesses and 21 manufacturers representing a cross-section of American ingenuity and innovation.

This year’s award recipients include Chicago-based Garrett Popcorn which sells gourmet popcorn from retail shops, and has expanded to sell their products throughout Asia and the Middle East; Nanci’s Frozen Yogurt of Mesa, Arizona, which makes and sells soft serve, flavorings, and smoothie mixes to frozen yogurt chains and restaurants in dozens of countries around the world; and Hernon Manufacturing, Inc. of Sanford, Florida, which makes high-performance adhesives, sealants,  and precision processing equipment, and exports to 44 countries. Each of this year’s “E” Award companies are selling high-quality products and services in every corner of the world and most importantly, are helping to create good jobs for American workers.

Many of the “E” Awardees are able to conduct business internationally as a result of the 14 Trade Agreements with 20 countries currently in place. The Obama administration is working closely with Congress to pass trade promotion legislation, which outlines Congressional priorities on trade agreements, so that the deals currently being negotiated can be put in place.

The “E” Award ceremony is one of the highlights of World Trade Month, a month-long celebration of the benefits that U.S. exports bring to national, state, and local economies through job creation and growth. This year marks the 53rd annual “E” Awards presentation, which recognizes companies for their contributions to increasing U.S. exports. In 1961, President Kennedy signed an executive order reviving the World War II “E” symbol of excellence to honor and provide recognition to America’s exporters.

American companies are nominated for “E” Awards through the U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service office network, located within the Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration. Record years of successive export growth and an applicant’s demonstration of an innovative international marketing plan that led to the increase in exports is a significant factor in selecting winners.

For the full list of 2015 “E” Awardees, visit http://1.usa.gov/1AaVUur

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World Trade Month: Reflecting on How Trade and Investment Lift the U.S. Economy

May 5, 2015

This post originally appeared on the Department of Commerce blog.

Stefan M. Selig is the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade

Shipping containers on a dockMay is World Trade Month. Every year at this time, we acknowledge the importance of trade and investment, and reiterate our commitment to the workers and businesses that sustain our country’s competitive advantages.

And given the records we achieved last year, this World Trade Month offers an excellent opportunity to reflect on how trade and investment lifts the U.S. economy.

For the fifth straight year, we set a record for annual exports. In 2014, we shipped out $2.34 trillion in goods and services. Those exports accounted for 13.4 percent of total GDP, compared to 7.5 percent 30 years ago.

U.S. jobs supported by exports also produced record numbers in 2014—11.7 million jobs. And those export supported jobs pay on average between 13-18 percent higher wages than non-export supported jobs.

As more American businesses, including small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) continue to increase exports to the 96 percent of consumers who live outside the U.S, we will see the trends of economic growth and job creation continue. That is why the entire administration is focusing its efforts on making trade promotion legislation a reality, which will give the President the same authority to negotiate trade agreements that every president has had since Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Events honoring World Trade Month, as well as assisting U.S. companies in their exporting efforts, are happening across the country.

Here are just a few of the events taking place this month:

  • May 2-10: National Travel and Tourism Week: recognizing the travel and tourism industry, our largest service export sector.
  • May 4-8: National Small Business Week: honoring America’s entrepreneurs since 1963. SMEs make up 98 percent of our country’s exporters.
  • May 12-14: Discover Global Markets: the Americas, in Miami, Fla.: connecting U.S. businesses with market opportunities in Central and South America.
  • May 16-22: Department of Commerce trade mission to Egypt, Jordan and Israel: focusing on export opportunities in the areas of health care equipment, services and technologies.

And trade promotion seminars throughout the country are currently being held. These seminars help first-time exporters connect to new markets and help experienced exporters connect to more markets. We encourage businesses to contact their nearest Export Assistance Center to find out about events in their local areas, or to speak to an export or industry specialist.

I encourage you to follow the International Trade Administration on Twitter at @TradeGov where we will highlight many of the great events taking place this month.

Finally, thanks to all of the exporters who made 2014 the record year it was. We salute you on this World Trade Month.

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Celebrating International Trade in Maryland

June 3, 2014
John Malone of WTS International accepts an Export Achievement Award from Jolanta Coffey of the Export Assistance Center in Baltimore, Md.

John Malone of WTS International accepts an Export Achievement Award from Jolanta Coffey of the Export Assistance Center in Baltimore, Md.

Jack McCutcheon and Paul Matino Support Maryland Businesses at the Baltimore Export Assistance Center.

International exporting can seem daunting to many large and small businesses because they are unsure how to successfully take advantage of opportunities abroad.

Last week, at the 2nd Annual Celebration of International Trade, speakers provided veteran insight about the realities of doing business beyond the borders of the United States. The celebration was in honor of International Trade Month and brought together ambitious Maryland businesses for the chance to learn more about growing their companies.

The celebration provided information and discussions on international financial considerations, risk management, logistics, and legal concerns of international exporting. Dominick Murray, Secretary of the Maryland Department of Business & Economic Development, stressed the fact that currently less than 10 percent of Maryland companies participate in exporting.

Laura Lane, President of Global Public Affairs for UPS, noted that 95 percent of the world’s consumers live outside the U.S., and that optimizing international commerce through the establishment of modern and effective free-trade agreements will be critical for the continued strength of the U.S. economy.

Between the educational seminars, the annual award ceremony honored an exemplary exporter in the DC-Maryland region, John Malone, who is the General Counsel and Vice President of Compliance and Quality Assurance at WTS International. WTS was this year’s recipient of the U.S. Commercial Service’s Export Achievement Award, and also also was recognized by Sen. Barbara Mikulski’s office.

Maryland District Export Council Members Carl Livesay and Maryjane Norris were also presented with awards recognizing their contributions to business.

Many of the celebration’s speakers noted that succeeding in foreign markets can be easier than it seems. With the right information, proper planning, and assistance from the state, doing business abroad can be both a great contribution to the bottom line, and good reason to return for the 3rd Annual Celebration of International Trade next year.

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Recognizing Those Supporting American Exports

May 28, 2014

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Ken Hyatt is the Acting Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade.

Icelantic Skis was one of 65 companies and organizations recognized by Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker with a President's E Award for supporting U.S. exports.

Icelantic Skis was one of 65 companies and organizations recognized by Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker with a President’s E Award for supporting U.S. exports. You can find more photos on our Facebook page.

We at the Department of Commerce produce a lot of numbers, but we always try to see behind the export numbers into what they create – jobs, growth, and development.

It was easy to see behind the numbers today, as I joined Secretary of Commerce Penny Pritzker to recognize and congratulate 65 companies and organizations that have supported the expansion of U.S. exports.

These companies and organizations earned the 2014 President’s E Awards, the highest honor bestowed upon those that are committed to expanding the U.S. economy through exports.

The awardees include an assortment of small and medium-sized businesses in a variety of states and business sectors. From Kansas-based Pioneer Balloon Company to California-based Robinson Pharma, both of which have expanded their exports with support from U.S. government agencies including the Department of Commerce.

Then there are organizations like the Global Commerce Council of the Metro Atlanta Chamber, which provides counseling, training, and networking opportunities to support Atlanta-area businesses looking to succeed overseas. This kind of support is crucial to businesses looking to expand their global presence.

There are 62 other companies and organizations that earned the President’s E Award, each and every one of which is working hard to make international trade a part of the DNA of American business.

I was honored to be a part of today’s ceremony, as I am continually honored to be a part of our nation’s growing commitment to international trade.

Congratulations to each and every company and organization recognized today, and thanks to every other American business, chamber of commerce, trade organization, World Trade Center, and other entities that are supporting U.S. businesses.

All of us at the Department of Commerce look forward to another year of more American companies competing and succeeding overseas, and to recognizing the businesses and organizations who exemplify the American commitment to global business during the next year.

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The Global Appeal of Alabama’s Southern Charm

May 19, 2014

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Robert Stackpole is the Director of the International Trade Administration’s Export Assistance Center in Birmingham, Ala.

Alabama Department of Commerce SealIn a business sense, Alabama can’t be pointed out in one location on a map. As the Alabama Department of Commerce is proud to point out, Alabama is everywhere.

Our Southern state is a global leader, exporting goods to about 200 foreign markets and attracting international business investment in high tech industries like aviation and automobile manufacturing. Our exports are up more than 50 percent since 2009, reaching $19.3 billion in 2013. Our transportation equipment exports have more than doubled in that time frame, reaching $8.3 billion.

There are plenty of reasons why Alabama is helping lead the way in global business. My favorite reason is this: teamwork.

The Export Alabama Alliance is a coalition of state and federal agencies, trade associations, and private organizations that have one mission in mind: helping Alabama grow through trade. We work hand-in-hand to support Alabama’s manufacturers, chemical companies, agriculture producers, and any other business looking to succeed in international markets.

We work with the ports for shipping intelligence, we contact our specialists overseas to understand market regulations, and we keep in touch with the chambers of commerce to understand the needs of Alabama’s businesses.

It’s an extraordinary level of cooperation, and it’s working. Of the eight companies recognized by Governor Bentley this year for export excellence, every one of them worked with the Alliance on some aspect of their international business plan.

As Alabama recognizes World Trade Week this week, we’re excited to celebrate the successes of our exporters and our subsidiaries of foreign-owned companies. We’ll toast to the thousands of jobs supported by global business throughout the state.

We’re also looking forward to bringing more of our small businesses into the global marketplace. If you’re ready to get started, we’re here to help!

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NOAA Provides Environmental Intelligence to Keep Goods Moving Along Our Marine Highways

May 14, 2014

This post originally appeared on the Department of Commerce blog.

A cargo ship loaded with storage containers navigates through a port. NOAA tools —such as nautical charts, accurate positioning services, and ocean and weather observations—play a key role in ensuring that shipments move swiftly and safely along our marine highways.

NOAA tools —such as nautical charts, accurate positioning services, and ocean and weather observations—play a key role in ensuring that shipments move swiftly and safely along our marine highways.

By weight, 75 percent of U.S. international trade moves through the nation’s ports and harbors. Those ports support, directly and indirectly, more than 13 million American jobs.

NOAA provides environmental intelligence to support safe, efficient, and environmentally sound navigation through U.S. ports. NOAA produces the nation’s nautical charts, which provide essential navigation information such as water depths; locations of dangers to navigation; locations and characteristics of aids to navigation; anchorages; and other features.

NOAA also integrates ocean and coastal observations, data, science, and services to provide actionable information, thereby improving informed choices. Good decisions today protect lives and property tomorrow.

The agency monitors, assesses, and distributes tide, current, and water level products and services. Positioning information from NOAA provides a highly accurate, precise, and consistent  framework to help mariners safely navigate around obstructions in our nation’s busy waterways.

NOAA’s role warning coastal areas of hurricane threats is well known, but the agency also plays a significant role after the storm. NOAA moves quickly to help reopen ports. Navigation response teams survey ports and channels, searching for submerged debris and other dangers to navigation. NOAA aerial photography helps the public, decision makers, and insurance adjusters assess the extent of storm damage.

In addition, NOAA’s Physical Oceanographic Real-time System (PORTS®) provides accurate real-time oceanographic information, tailored to the specific needs of local maritime communities. Knowledge of the currents, water levels, winds, and density of the water can increase the amount of cargo moved through a port and harbor by enabling mariners to safely utilize every inch of dredged channel depth. For example, an economic study showed that the Tampa Bay economy receives more than $7 million a year in savings and direct income from PORTS®. A second study calculated $16 million a year in savings for the Houston-Galveston region.

Learn more at http://oceanservice.noaa.gov/navigation/marinenav/

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Secretary Pritzker Announces Next Phase of the National Export Initiative — NEI/NEXT

May 13, 2014

This post originally appeared on the Department of Commerce blog.

NEI Next emblemToday, Secretary Penny Pritzker announced NEI/NEXT – a data-based, customer service-driven initiative to ensure that more American businesses can fully capitalize on markets that are opening up around the world. Through five core objectives, NEI/NEXT will build on Administration-wide achievements under the National Export Initiative (NEI), to help all businesses reach the 95 percent of consumers who live outside the United States.

Under the NEI, the United States has had four straight record-breaking years of exports – hitting an all-time high of $2.3 trillion dollars last year – up $700 billion from 2009. The NEI has been instrumental in strengthening high-level commercial advocacy on behalf of U.S. companies, increasing small business participation in trade events, partnering with regions to develop export plans, expanding strategic partnerships to promote exports,  implementing our trade agreements, enforcing U.S. trade rights, and driving the most ambitious trade agenda in a generation.

In a new economic report released today by the Department of Commerce, data shows that nearly one-third of the country’s economic growth since mid-2009 has been driven by exports. Nearly 30,000 businesses have started exporting for the first time. And most importantly, since 2009, the number of jobs supported by exports has grown by 1.6 million to more than 11.3 million – the highest in 20 years.

Yet still, too many American firms remain focused on domestic markets.  Less than 5 percent of U.S. companies export, and more than half of those exporters sell to only one market. To help bridge that gap, and look for new opportunities to help U.S. businesses export, the Department of Commerce, along with 20 federal agency partners last year began to take a fresh look at the NEI and develop strategies that would help make trade a central part of America’s economic DNA.  The end product of that interagency review resulted in five key strategies to help more U.S. companies reach more markets. The five objectives of NEI/NEXT include:

  1. Connecting more U.S. businesses to their NEXT global customer with tailored industry-specific information and assistance.
  2. Making the NEXT international shipment easier and less expensive, through efforts to streamline U.S. government export-related services, reporting requirements and processes, and speeding American goods to more markets through domestic infrastructure improvements.
  3. Expanding access to finance for U.S. businesses’ NEXT export transaction, helping more exporters obtain financing to meet international demand, and ensuring more companies know what products and services are available to reduce risk and export to new markets with confidence.
  4. Promoting exports and foreign direct investment attraction as the NEXT economic development priority in communities and regions across the country by enhancing partnerships with local and state leaders and by coordinating with SelectUSA, the U.S. government-wide program housed within the Department of Commerce to facilitate foreign direct investment.
  5. Creating, fostering and ensuring U.S. business’ NEXT global opportunity by helping developed and developing economies improve their business environments, by opening new markets, and by establishing conditions and addressing barriers to allow more American exporters to compete and win abroad.

Underlying this entire strategy will be an effort to support the creation of improved data to help companies make decisions, to help communities integrate exports into their economic development plans, and to help us – as a government – gather feedback and continuously improve our efforts.

Read Secretary Pritzker’s complete remarks at The Atlantic about NEI/NEXT.