Posts Tagged ‘jobs’

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One Shining Moment for American Exports

March 18, 2013

Francisco Sanchez is the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade.

Uder Secretary Sanchez has Louisville, Indiana, Ohio State and Kansas in his Final Four. He picked Louisville to beat Indy for the championship. Notable upsets include Harvard making the Sweet 16 and Wisconsin knocking out Gonzaga to make the Elite 8.

Francisco Sanchez picked Louisville as the 2013 NCAA basketball champion.

I may not be the biggest basketball fan.

Still I, like so many Americans, spent some time Sunday night predicting the outcomes of one of our country’s great traditions – the NCAA Basketball Tournament. You may well have been doing the same thing; the NCAA Tournament bracket is a ubiquitous image, appearing on countless office walls and bedroom doors all over the country.

Now I may not regularly cheer for basketball, but I’m a huge fan of exports. And what you may not have realized when you filled out your bracket is that you were, in fact, supporting American exports.

It’s true: The television licensing for the tournament, the apparel licensing for universities, and the education industry itself are all American export industries, supporting thousands of American jobs.

As the NCAA Basketball Tournament is a great American tradition, exports are also a great tradition for us at the International Trade Administration. So over the next couple of weeks, we’ll be sharing some information with you that shows how this celebrated American custom ties into American exports, thereby supporting the American economy.

Before we kick that off, we have our own fun office competition to share with all of you:

As you may know, we have Export Assistance Centers (EACs) all over the country to help U.S. businesses compete globally. Well, we asked the four offices closest to the four #1 seeds in the tournament to fill out a bracket on Selection Sunday to post on our blog. I’m submitting mine for competition as well. So here are the participating offices representing the top seeds and their brackets:

How does your bracket stack up to each of ours? How are you going to be supporting exports during this year’s tournament? Let us know here or get involved in the conversation on Twitter and Facebook. Make sure to support your team and American exports as we crown national champions in men’s and women’s college basketball this year.

Be sure to check back on the blog as we highlight just how much of an impact American pastimes like March Madness contribute to American exports. No matter who wins, the U.S. is always the champ when we support exports.

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Analysis: The Global Push for American-Made

March 13, 2013

The following is an excerpt from an op-ed piece written by Francisco Sanchez, Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade.Francisco Sanchez is the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade

There’s no doubt about it: Doing business in America is changing. And businesses with even the most loyal customers are finding that their customers are changing, too. In an increasingly global marketplace, business owners across the U.S. are realizing that their next major customer may no longer come from across town, but beyond our borders.

While news of American exports may not capture the headlines as government shutdowns and political impasses do, the proof is in the thousands of regional businesses who are witnessing its value first hand.

Not only did U.S. exports outpace the growth of imports in 2012 for the first time since 2007, but exports have helped support the creation of more than 6 million private-sector jobs during the past 35 months. The world wants what America makes.

Read the remainder of the piece at the Charleston Regional Business Journal.

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Recognizing Three Years of Export Growth

March 12, 2013

Francisco Sánchez serves as the Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade. A trend of rising exports since 2009 culminated in a record $2.2 trillion in exports in 2012, supporting 9.8 million American jobs.

During the last several weeks, we’ve highlighted a lot of great news in the business of U.S. exports.

From record exports in travel and tourism to successes in gaining access for American companies to foreign markets, 2012 gave us a lot to be proud of in the field of exports. More important than just the dollar amounts is the fact that almost 10 million jobs were supported by these exports in 2012.

This success is the direct result of a concentrated initiative introduced by President Obama in 2010, one that has coordinated the efforts of several U.S. government agencies to increase American exports and create American jobs. Under the National Export Initiative (NEI), we’ve seen U.S. exports increase from $1.58 trillion in 2009, to a record $2.2 trillion in 2012.

We recognize the third anniversary of the NEI this week, so we’ll be sharing some of the successes we’ve seen under this initiative over the next several days.

I hope you will get in on the conversation. How have exports helped your business? How can the International Trade Administration and other government agencies help you increase exports? Follow some of America’s core export-promotion agencies on this Twitter list to learn about the government’s efforts to help U.S. business.

As always, ITA is here to help any U.S. company looking to create or increase exports. It all starts with a visit to one of our Export Assistance Centers or to export.gov.

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U.S. Trade and Exports Support 9.8 Million American Jobs

February 26, 2013

Tyler Braswell is an intern for the International Trade Administration’s Office of Public Affairs. He is studying International Business at George Washington University.Data from the Department of Commerce show that U.S. exports in 2012 totaled nearly $2.2 trillion, a record for American exports.

According to new data, in 2012, U.S. exports reached a record $2.2 trillion dollars – the largest annual export total in U.S. history. This 2012 total exceeds the previous year’s record high of $2.1 trillion.

Further, U.S. exports supported 9.8 million jobs in 2012, which means that U.S. exports have supported an additional 1.3 million jobs since the launch of the President’s National Export Initiative.

This growth is reflective of the efforts put forth by the International Trade Administration (ITA) and related government agencies.

As a student who will graduate with a degree in international business, I appreciate the focus the International Trade Administration places on expanding the U.S. economy beyond our borders. Specifically, this focus gives me hope that my particular degree and specialization will result in employment once I graduate.

The overall goal of the U.S. Department of Commerce is to promote job creation, economic growth, sustainable development, and improved standards of living for all Americans. Market development, expansion, and constant reform are vital to the success of the U.S. economy. It is exciting to know that President Obama is a major proponent of these ideas.

The President’s National Export Initiative and the supporting strategies created here at ITA are producing results – tangible results we are seeing through the jobs the increase in exports is supporting.

It is also exciting to know that the nearly 10 million jobs that exports support are in all 50 states and a range of industries. Here at ITA we will continue to do all we can to help U.S. businesses expand their exports in order to assist the American workers whose jobs these exports support.

Business looking to create or increase exports can visit www.export.gov to find out how ITA can help.

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Under Secretary Sánchez to Speak on Panel for Technology-Based Global Innovation

January 31, 2013

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Tyler Braswell is an intern for the International Trade Administration’s Office of Public Affairs. He is studying International Business and attends George Washington University.

The Digital Age is upon us. The effect of digital technology on the global market has been well documented as technology-based companies continue to supply the world with innovative methods and products that increase the quality and efficiency of American lives and businesses.  The creation of jobs due to new technology as well as the continued financial success of technology-based firms has made the promotion of technology-based innovation a top priority for any economy looking to compete internationally.

President Obama’s plan to make high-speed wireless services available to 98% of Americans will make technology-based software and products even more accessible to American consumers. As technology is integrated more deeply into society, the U.S. is working to ensure that these integrations directly translate to domestic economic growth.

On Feb. 4, Francisco Sánchez, Under Secretary of Commerce for International Trade, will participate in an event hosted by the Information Technology Innovation Foundation (ITIF). The ITIF is a non-partisan think tank whose mission is to help American policymakers better understand the nature of a new innovation-driven economy.

The ITIF discussion panel will focus on the increase in global competition to host technology-based firms and the benefits that hosting such companies can have on a country’s economy. The event will also feature information on how countries attract technology-based firms and what the U.S. has done to improve its appeal to those firms. The Under Secretary will be joined on the panel by the general counsels for NCR and Qualcomm.

Sánchez and the panel will answer questions from industry participants concerning the advantages currently offered to firms that choose to do business within the United States.

The Under Secretary will also provide information on certain policies the U.S. has enacted to promote technology-based industry within the U.S. as well as trade agreements designed to benefit American companies.

The U.S. is actively advancing trade agreements and initiatives to broaden market access. Technology-based firms will be among the primary beneficiaries. Trade agreements like the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) will help technology-based firms by expanding access to key Asian markets and removing bans on border crossing data-flows.

American leaders—both in government and business—appreciate that supporting technology-based firms is necessary to achieve President Obama’s goal of increasing our exports and re-balancing our economy, which are embedded in the National Export Initiative. This event will reaffirm the International Trade Administration’s commitment to increase exports, further the global expansion of domestic businesses, and attract new technology-based industries to the U.S. economy.

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Made in Maine

June 14, 2012

Kim Glas is the deputy assistant secretary for textiles and apparel within the International Trade Administration’s Import Administration division.

The International Trade Administration’s (ITA) Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Import Administration, Paul Piquadoand I last week toured New Balance and Auburn Manufacturing, Inc. (AMI), two Maine companies that are producing high quality, Made in USA products.

Assistant Secretary of the Import Administration Paul Piquado and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Textiles and Apparel Kim Glas in front of New Balance footwear factory in Skowhegan, Maine with workers and management following tour.

Assistant Secretary of the Import Administration Paul Piquado and Deputy Assistant Secretary of Textiles and Apparel Kim Glas in front of New Balance footwear factory in Skowhegan, Maine with workers and management following tour.

At New Balance in Skowhegan, the tour showcased New Balance’s American-made and designed footwear manufacturing. The Skowhegan facility is one of five New Balance footwear plants located in New England, collectively employ roughly 2,700 workers. The company is the only firm that currently manufactures athletic footwear in the United States.

At AMI in Mechanic Falls, we toured the company’s state-of-the art facility that produces fire- and heat-resistant textiles. AMI is a small, woman-owned business employing 50 people in the Lewiston-Auburn area. AMI produces textiles that protect people and processes from extreme heat and flames. AMI also manufactures end-use products including a patented, modular insulation kit, and a line of first-ever hot work safety blankets that are third-party certified. For over 30 years, the company has been producing advanced products that meet stringent U.S. military and safety standards. Its reputation as an industry leader is a direct result of an ongoing commitment to investing in innovation and technology.

After the tours of the New Balance and Auburn Manufacturing facilities, Assistant Secretary Piquado and I had the opportunity to have a discussion with company employees and management, to hear their viewpoints regarding U.S. manufacturing, the challenges they face and the successes they have achieved.  One focus of the Obama Administration is strengthening the economy by growing U.S. exports and export-supported jobs.  Hearing directly from the workers at these two facilities helps us to better understand the challenges facing U.S. companies to achieving this goal.

As locals know, the importance of exports to Maine’s economy is significant. Over one-sixth of all manufacturing workers in the state depend on exports. That is why this trip was so rewarding.

One of the main objectives of our office – and ITA as a whole – is to promote the competitiveness of textiles, apparel, and footwear in the domestic and international markets, in support of U.S. industry and jobs. Both New Balance and Auburn are accomplishing this as they export their products worldwide – and our office is committed to helping similar Made in the USA brands have similar success.

Please visit the Office of Textiles and Apparel website for more information about the services and information we offer.

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3-2-1…..JOBS!

June 4, 2012

Kim Wells is a senior international trade specialist with 19 years of experience supporting commercial space exports.

By now, you’ve heard the news—for the first time ever, a commercial company has launched to and berthed with the International Space Station!  On May 22, SpaceX successfully launched its Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon capsule from Cape Canaveral, Florida to resupply the Station.  After three days of very precise maneuvers, the Dragon capsule then berthed with the Station and the astronauts, representing Russia, Europe, and the United States, opened the hatch door to welcome a new world of commercial space ventures.

View from the International Space Station of the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft as the station’s robotic arm moves Dragon into place for attachment to the station. May 25, 2012. Photo: NASA

View from the International Space Station of the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft as the station’s robotic arm moves Dragon into place for attachment to the station. May 25, 2012. Photo: NASA

Until now, this type of exploration activity in space had only been attempted by very few governments and no private companies.  But space exploration isn’t cheap, and with the retirement of the Space Shuttle, NASA sought a more cost-effective way to re-supply cargo to the Station.  The result was NASA’s Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) program, in which SpaceX and Orbital Sciences were selected to develop the ability to delivery cargo—and potentially, crew—to the International Space Station so that NASA could begin to focus its efforts on more challenging exploration ventures—like returning to the Moon or traveling to Mars.  On top of that, using commercial services for resupply is projected to save NASA up to $4 billion.  In just four and a half years, and only $300 million dollars, the all-American Falcon 9 rocket went from a blank sheet to first launch.  Hopefully, this successful launch and docking will be just the first of many, many commercial trips that support the international exploration of space.

The International Space Station has always been a collaborative venture.  Japan, Russia, Europe and many others contributed to its construction and continue to support its operation. But never before has the private sector been involved.  Until now.

This opportunity was also a big change for SpaceX.  Founded in 2002 by PayPal entrepreneur Elon Musk, SpaceX has privately built the Falcon 1 and Falcon 9 rockets from the ground up in its Hawthorne, California facility.  SpaceX employs over 1,800 people in high-tech jobs primarily in California, Texas and Florida, but also supports over 1,700 suppliers nationwide.  In fact, each Falcon 9 rocket launch supports over 750 jobs—220 at SpaceX and another 530 indirect positions!

The mainstay of any commercial rocket business is launching satellites.  We use satellites each day –whether we know it or not.  Rockets like the Falcon 9 have launched everything from communications satellites (so you can call your friends), GPS satellites (so you can find out where to go meet them), remote sensing/imaging satellites (so you can have an accurate map and picture of where you’re going), and broadcast satellites (so you can watch TV once you arrive).  In 2011, there were 18 commercial satellites launches around the world, which generated approximately $1.9 billion in revenue from the launches alone.  Most of those satellites were built in the United States, supporting thousands more high-tech jobs in suppliers across the country.

In addition to U.S. manufacturing, thousands of more jobs are created in the satellite services sector.  The commercial space sector provides jobs, and spurs innovation, exploration, international cooperation and partnerships.

While supplying the Space Station via commercial transportation is good business, its high-profile mission is also great advertising for the more traditional business line of launching satellites for customers–foreign and domestic.  The International Trade Administration works to support this type of advancement, not just at SpaceX, but for all U.S. companies.  SpaceX and other commercial space companies have worked closely with offices in the Commercial Service and Manufacturing and Services to identify foreign opportunities and address policy concerns that could impede their competitiveness.

This effort is a historic accomplishment for NASA, SpaceX, and the American space program, borne out of the ingenuity, hard work and determination to restore America’s domestic access to the International Space Station.  As a nation, we should be proud of this example of American innovation and technological achievement, the economic benefit that it provides to U.S. citizens and overarching rewards that are shared by people around the globe as we explore space together.