Posts Tagged ‘World Trade Month’

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World Trade Month: Honoring the Role of Intellectual Property in Sports

May 20, 2019

Jessica Pomper is an International Trade Specialist in the Office of Intellectual Property Rights at the International Trade Administration

Regardless of whether you love or hate the New England Patriots, I’m sure you saw Tom Brady’s jersey everywhere the days leading up to and immediately following the Super Bowl. But how sure are you that it was a real jersey? Do you know what it means for the jersey to be authentic? That’s where intellectual property (IP) comes in to play. Our office covers intellectual property rights across international trade, and this month we are celebrating World Trade Month. IP plays a large role in international trade, as goods need to be protected across borders. On April 26, people across the globe celebrated World IP Day. This year’s theme was sports and IP, as the two share a close relationship. One topic that shows the close relationship between the two is counterfeit sporting goods. Our STOPfakes website is dedicated to the protection of IP across the globe, and even features a consumer guide to counterfeit and pirated goods.soccer field

Now let’s delve deeper into the role of IP, and take a closer look at the details on a Super Bowl LIII Tom Brady jersey

At the top, we have the collar. One of the hardest things to fake — and fake well —  is the NFL shield. The new National Football League (NFL) Nike jerseys have a rubberized NFL shield sewn into the center of the collar. If the NFL shield is embroidered or ironed on, you have a fake. On either shoulder is Brady’s number (12), screen printed below the border of the collar. If the number is embroidered or if it does not match the team’s font and colors, you have a fake. And these aren’t the only signifiers; there are dozens of details on sports jerseys that help distinguish between fakes and the real deal.

What exactly makes one jersey authentic and the other infringing? Each of the involved parties owns the IP displayed on the jersey. The NFL logo is a trademark owned by the NFL and is licensed to companies for use in products. The NFL is the licensor and Nike is the licensee, meaning Nike is officially and legally allowed to use the official NFL logo for this jersey. The NFL also owns trademarks for the word “Super Bowl,” and any logos used for the Super Bowl; the NFL licensed this logo for use by licensee Nike.

The New England Patriots own trademarks to their name, logo, slogan, and other elements that identify the Patriots brand. The New England Patriots are also the licensor in this case, licensing use of its name and logo to Nike for the jersey’s creation. As the creator of the product, Nike is free to use its own trademarked swoosh logo throughout the jersey’s design.

Now that we understand that IP is at play, why does it matter? The sports industry is a multi-billion-dollar industry. Leading equipment and apparel providers have a great deal invested in their designs, endorsements, and reputation for quality. To recover value from these investments, brands need to protect their IP. While apparel — such as jerseys — are in-demand products that call for IP protection, there are also other parts of the industry that need protection. For example, broadcast networks can lose market share to sports piracy sites and illegal streaming platforms (i.e., websites where the website owner lacks the right or authorization to stream the content). Subscription networks such as ESPN, NBC Sports Network, and Fox Sports are often the victims of piracy. Despite laws and regulations in countries around the world, piracy still occurs throughout the globe. Piracy can take on many forms, such as the unlicensed distribution of recordings, unlicensed DVD production and/or distribution, unauthorized live streaming, or the unlicensed transmission of cable networks. Stopping piracy has become a global effort, with stakeholders and government agencies working to preserve and defend their rights.

The U.S. government pays close attention to how countries around the world protect American innovation and ingenuity. If you’re interested in learning more about how counterfeiting and piracy continue to affect industries and how governments get involved, you can read more on our STOPfakes website.

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New Mexico Exporter Brings Clean Water to World Markets

May 16, 2019

This blog post originally appeared on Thomas.  

Curt Cultice is a Senior Communications Specialist for the International Trade Administration.

Growing up in Waco, Texas, Stan Lueck always had a knack for environmental science, especially soil and water.

He pursued his career interest in the late 1970s and early 80s by earning a Bachelor of Science degree at Baylor University, and then undertook graduate studies in chemical engineering at the University of Texas at Arlington. Following his passion, he continued to hone his expertise as a technical professional, engineer, and entrepreneur.boat

“Our family lived on a rural farm raising cattle and hay, which gave me great exposure to science and mechanics — something that I’ve always had an interest in,” Lueck says. “After my college studies, I worked for an environmental consulting company, but after a few years, I thought, why not go bigger by starting my own business?”

After starting one business in the early 1990s, opportunity came knocking again when Lueck founded RODI Systems in 1995. As president of the Aztec, New Mexico-based firm, he grew the business, molding the company into a worldwide leader in the design and fabrication of high-performance water treatment systems.

Today, his firm supplies world markets with its technologies, and a product line featuring large, high-end water treatment systems, and smaller testing units. A large portion of the company’s business is seawater desalination treatment technology and portable self-contained treatment systems housed in intermodal shipping containers.

“For me, the real passion is to be able to build things, make them work, and send the equipment halfway around the world,” Lueck says. “At the same time, we’re also contributing to the quality of people’s lives by giving them access to clean drinking water. So, it’s a very fulfilling job.”

Export Help from the U.S. Commercial Service

RODI’s first foray into exporting began in the late 1990s. In more recent years, the firm has stepped up its export expansion, increasing its global presence in the developing world by targeting municipal governments and industrial users in markets throughout Africa, Southeast Asia, and South America – places where the need is especially prevalent.

However, successful exporting often depends on overcoming initial challenges, as Lueck can attest.

“One of the ongoing issues we faced in expanding our export sales was mitigating potential risk,” he says. “We were looking for advice and assistance in answering questions which would arise. It was about that time—about five or six years ago—that we received a call from Robert Queen.”

At the time, Queen had just stepped in as the new director of the U.S. Commercial Service in New Mexico. His office is part of the global network of the U.S. Commercial Service that helps U.S. companies export. This network includes 100+ offices across the United States and in more than 75 countries.

Starting with that phone call, Queen was reaching out to businesses and looking to see how he might assist Lueck with his export planning.

Says Queen, “Our assistance to Stan has ranged from finding out the best infrastructure trade leads and events to pursue, to checking out potential foreign partners — all of which requires due diligence.

“For example, in researching a lead Stan had found on the website, we discovered the buyer’s address was false. As a result, we helped Stan avoid a potentially costly mistake. Stan has also sought guidance on ensuring that shipping and logistics go smoothly without delay.”

Queen says he takes a collaborative approach to export assistance by engaging with his domestic colleagues or trade experts at U.S. embassies abroad, who have an ear to the ground in their respective markets. He says a large share of inquiries from exporters involves assistance in resolving trade problems, which may arise during the export process.

However, careful export planning in advance is key to minimize potential problems. RODI exports range anywhere from two to four high-end units a year worth upwards of more than $1,000,000 each, so, as Queen says, “we work with Stan to get it right the first time.”

In addition to his business clients being just a phone call or email away from help, about once each quarter Queen hits the road, driving hundreds of miles across New Mexico to visit rural-based business clients such as RODI, which might otherwise not have easy access to face-to-face export counseling. This is just one example of how the Commercial Service continues to extend its reach into traditionally underserved rural areas.

“Checking with the Commercial Service ahead of time gives us a presence in foreign countries when we don’t have one,” said Lueck. “It can be incredibly difficult and expensive for us to do on our own, and we might have to travel, so it’s a huge cost and time savings. Just recently, we were told that an overseas project we wanted to pursue was not what it appeared to be.”

More Export Sales, More Company Growth  

Leveraging U.S. Commercial Service export advice, trade show support, market intelligence, and other outside resources, Lueck sees new export opportunities on the horizon and is moving ahead with greater confidence.

He also says that without exports, his company wouldn’t be where it is today, with sales to more than 40 markets — including countries such as Indonesia, South Africa, Brazil, India, Sri Lanka, Oman, Canada, and Kuwait, to name a few.

“Exports now account for 80% of our overall sales, more than doubling from just a few years ago,” he says. “As a result, we’ve been able to boost the bottom line, sustain a steady workforce of 14 employees, and recently tripled the size of our production yard here in Aztec.”

Lueck also encourages those U.S. businesses that have not yet exported or may be selling to only one or two markets, to consider their export potential.

“I would say it’s something you should definitely look into,” he says. “It’s a bit of a learning curve, but the potential rewards are well worth it — and the Commercial Service is available to assist.”

Taking Advantage of Resources

The federal government’s export assistance portal offers digital support and additional resources; it can also help users locate local and overseas U.S. Commercial Service offices.

Also helpful are the Exporting Basics video series, which reviews all steps involved in the exporting process and outlines the available export resources, and the Country Commercial Guides, which offer the latest market intelligence on more than 140 markets.

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A Free and Open Indo-Pacific Ignites U.S. Business Opportunities and the American Workforce

May 13, 2019

Diane Farrell is the Deputy Assistant Secretary for International Trade Administration’s Office of Asia 

Last July at the Indo-Pacific Business Forum, Secretary Ross along with other senior Administration officials, reaffirmed the U.S. government economic efforts to advance the President’s vision of a free and open Indo-Pacific.  The United States’ vision of a free and open Indo-Pacific is rooted in respect for sovereignty, fair and reciprocal trade, transparent governance, and private sector-led economic growth. For the Indo-Pacific to thrive, the U.S. encourages countries to pursue open, transparent, and rules-based development policies. It also emphasizes the importance of investing in high-quality infrastructure projects that are affordable and sustainable over the long-run.  Finally, the U.S. is optimistic about the opportunities for U.S. companies to contribute to this vision by increasing their exports of high-quality, innovative, goods and services to markets throughout the region.

DAS Farrell

DAS Farrell joins the governments of Papua New Guinea and Fiji at the Asian Development Bank’s annual meeting. Catalyzing U.S. commercial engagement in the Pacific Island Countries is an important part of advancing a free and open Indo-Pacific.

U.S. exporters have significant opportunities to explore in the vast and growing Indo-Pacific region which stretches from the west coast of India to the west coast of the United States. In 2018, U.S. exports of goods and services to the region totaled more than $476 billion. U.S. companies’ high-quality goods and services can address needs in these markets particularly in healthcare, energy, aerospace/defense, information and communication technology and infrastructure.

A free and open Indo-Pacific means fair and reciprocal access to these export opportunities for U.S. companies, which will help grow the U.S. economy and support good paying jobs in America. On average, U.S. firms that export see sales grow faster, more jobs created, and higher wages for employees than non-exporting firms. In 2018, the International Trade Administration’s work to ensure fair and reciprocal trade around the world enabled $104 billion in U.S. exports and $20 billion in inward investment supporting over 570,000 American jobs.

The International Trade Administration has been championing this Administration goal since July, by not only enforcing the principles of fair and reciprocal trade in the region, but also reinvigorating America’s entrepreneurial spirit in the Indo-Pacific through a sequenced set of data- and opportunity-driven programs: Access Asia, Discover Global Markets Indo-Pacific and Trade Winds Indo-Pacific.

Access Asia was launched last year and has reached over 1,000 U.S. Companies in more than 25 cities across the United States. It is a series of events across the U.S. that gives ready-to-export U.S. companies access to U.S. Commercial Service diplomats from Indo-Pacific markets who help them develop strategies to access immediate commercial opportunities in strategic sectors like healthcare, energy, aerospace/defense, and information and communication technology. Through Access Asia, we seek to  increase U.S. exports to the Indo-Pacific region and further the Administration’s emphasis on reducing the U.S. trade deficit.

 Discover Global Markets: Indo-Pacific took place in Salt Lake City, Utah, December 10-12, 2018, with a  focus on connecting U.S. companies with defense and aerospace business opportunities and developing stronger strategic ties in the region. More than 330 people from 36 states attended and over 700 one-on-one meetings were held between U.S. companies, U.S. Commercial Service Diplomats, foreign buyers, and large U.S. original equipment manufacturers.

Last week’s, Trade Winds Indo-Pacific Forum and Mission in India and Bangladesh provided U.S. exporters with the opportunity to further pursue business ventures that began in discussions occurring at Discover Global Markets Indo-Pacific and Access Asia events. Trade Winds is the U.S. government’s largest annual trade mission. This year’s mission featured U.S. Commercial Service diplomats from markets across the Indo-Pacific including Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam.

Finally, ITA encourages companies to embrace their entrepreneurial roots and explore new, developing markets. In partnership with the State Department, ITA now delivers its services in Papua New Guinea and Nepal. In partnership with Australia and the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, ITA is hosting an event on the margins of the Asian Development Bank Annual Meeting to connect U.S. and Australian companies and Pacific Island Country leaders to discuss infrastructure opportunities and challenges.

ITA’s worldwide network of experts advances the President’s vision of a free and open Indo-Pacific by eliminating trade barriers, negotiating fair trade deals, ensuring compliance with trade laws and agreements, and expanding trade opportunities for U.S. businesses and investment opportunities for foreign companies. Working with our foreign partners on these activities will help catalyze private-sector led economic development for them and help the American economy grow.

For U.S. companies ready to start exploring, find your local International Trade Specialist at www.export.gov/locations to discuss opportunities you may have in the Indo-Pacific.  To learn more about ITA’s activities in the Indo-Pacific, visit our Indo-Pacific website.

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Travel and Tourism Means Big Business for the United States, Including Manufacturers

May 6, 2019

Phil Lovas is Deputy Assistant Secretary for Travel and Tourism, Industry & Analysis for the International Trade Administration at the U.S. Department of Commerce

mfg is a destination nttw

May is World Trade Month, a time when we celebrate the importance of international trade to the economy and creating jobs.  I find it fitting that we also celebrate National Travel and Tourism Week in May, as International visitor spending in the United States represents 32 percent of U.S. services exports and 11 percent of all U.S. exports, goods and services combined.  In 2017, the United States welcomed nearly 77 million international visitors who spent more than $251 billion exploring the diverse cities, states, and regions of our nation.  Travel and tourism means big business for the United States, including manufacturers. While travel and tourism is a significant part of the U.S. services sector, the International Trade Administration’s National Travel and Tourism Office thought it would be an excellent opportunity to highlight travel and tourism’s impact on foreign direct investment into U.S. manufacturing.  You may be asking yourself, are there connections between manufacturing, foreign direct investment, and travel and tourism?  The answer is a resounding YES!  Not only do international visitors spend money while they are here, but they get to know our people, our places, and discover that the United States is a great place to do business and invest.

There are hundreds of manufacturing sites and factories throughout the United States that you can tour to watch U.S.-manufactured goods taking shape right before your eyes. Click here to find one near you. What better way to encourage foreign direct investment than to allow potential investors to see the production of made-in-America products?

To encourage more business investment in the United States, the U.S. Department of Commerce will host the next SelectUSA Investment Summit on June 10-12 in Washington, DC. The SelectUSA Investment Summit promotes the United States as the world’s premier investment destination and connects qualified foreign firms with U.S. economic development organizations to facilitate business investment and job creation.

In conjunction with the Investment Summit, SelectUSA is partnering with economic development organizations across the U.S. to plan and promote spinoff events. These events provide potential investors the opportunity to see first-hand the American communities in which their businesses can grow and thrive. Check out the lineup of spinoff events to see how U.S. localities are attracting job-creating business investment.

A healthy travel and tourism industry can be one of the most significant contributors to economic development, attracting potential new businesses to destinations throughout the United States.

In support of travel and tourism and the benefits it brings to U.S. manufacturing, the U.S. Department of Commerce has teamed up with the state and territorial tourism offices across the United States to highlight manufacturing and factory tour opportunities.  Visitors can witness the production of made-in-America agriculture products, baseball bats, honey, kazoos, tractors, cookies, automobiles, bourbon, goat cheese, golf clubs, furniture, and canoes.

Whether you are interested in expanding your business footprint in the United States, investing in U.S. goods or simply planning your family’s summer holiday, please visit us on the web to find a tour in your next travel destination!

Follow ITA on Twitter as we highlight the importance of travel and tourism to economic development in the United States.

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Looking to Increase Sales? “Go Global” World Trade Month Webinars Can Help Get You Started

May 2, 2019

David M. Glaccum is SBA’s Associate Administrator for International Trade and Pat Kirwan is the Director of the Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee Secretariat

In celebration of World Trade Month, federal trade promotion agencies will host our annual “Go Global” webinar series throughout May. U.S. businesses will learn about strategies and resources to increase global sales. The webinars address issues confronting companies and offer participants the chance to ask questions directly of the experts. Mark your calendar for this FREE four-part series on Thursdays in May. Here’s what you’ll learn about:World Trade Month Webinar Series

How do I find new buyers, finance sales and get paid? (May 9 at 2 p.m. EDT)

Learn how SBA and EXIM finance and credit insurance tools, along with market entry services from the U.S. Commercial Service, can help you unlock business potential in foreign markets. Access to finance and finding buyers are two of the most common challenges to small business exporting. Hear from a small business exporter who has used these programs to grow their business beyond the United States.Get expert advice, register now for the May 9 webinar.

How do I manage challenges in the global marketplace? (May 16 at 2 p.m. EDT)

Whether it’s protecting intellectual property rights, competing for foreign government procurement, or addressing trade barriers, learn about U.S. Department of Commerce programs that can help.  Once a small business starts selling to global customers, there will inevitably be a few bumps in the road. Knowing how to avoid challenges, or if they occur, where to turn for support can save time and money.

What tools can help me find new markets? (May 23 at 2 p.m. EDT)

Discover the power of data for finding foreign market opportunities. Get a hands-on tutorial of data tools that can help businesses that are ready to increase international sales. USA Trade Online, the Global Market Finder Tool, and the ITA Market Diversification Tool are available for anyone to use to identify new markets, evaluate existing markets, and perform other market research.

How can I identify trade opportunities in international development? (May 30 at 2 p.m. EDT)

Small business exporters can truly make the world a better place by doing good. In our final webinar of the series, gain insights into the work of U.S. development agencies. You’ll also hear about trade opportunities that can grow your business while solving the world’s most pressing problems.

Your Next Step in Global Sales Growth: Join the Webinar Series Thursdays in May

Whether you are a new exporter or an experienced international business, you will get valuable insight from this year’s “Go Global” webinar series.  Federal agencies are here to support your business’s success abroad. Click here to for details on the webinar series.

The federal agencies presenting this series are the U.S. Small Business Administration, U.S. Export-Import Bank, the U.S. Department of Commerce (International Trade Administration and U.S. Census Bureau), the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the U.S. Trade and Development Agency.

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The International Trade Administration Celebrates World Trade Month

May 1, 2019

Gilbert Kaplan is the Under Secretary of Commerce for the International Trade Administration 

During World Trade Month, the International Trade Administration (ITA) will celebrate our commitment to preserving free, fair, and reciprocal trade that enhances American prosperity. Our nation is among the most innovative and open economies in the world, and for decades the United States has led the international trading system that has enabled American businesses and workers to succeed.

Gilbert Kaplan

 Under Secretary of Commerce for the International Trade Administration, Gilbert Kaplan

ITA has paved the way in enforcing the principles of free, fair, and reciprocal trade in addition to igniting America’s entrepreneurial spirit in areas of the world like the Indo-Pacific. The Department of Commerce will host our largest annual trade mission, Trade Winds, from May 6-13 in India. The Trade Winds Indo-Pacific Forum and Mission will provide U.S. exporters with the opportunity to further pursue business ventures throughout the Indo-Pacific. In 2018, U.S. exports of goods and services to the region were more than $476 billion. We see 2019 creating even greater potential for the future of U.S. exports to the region.

World Trade Month also brings ITA an additional opportunity to focus on small and medium-sized enterprises, or SMEs. Nearly 285,000 U.S. companies exported goods in 2017, more than 97 percent of which were small or medium-sized businesses with fewer than 500 employees. ITA has encouraged market driven solutions to financing, where SMEs have greater access to the resources available and higher rates of success participating in the global marketplace. Furthermore, in line with this Administration’s emphasis on America being “open for business,” we have prioritized attracting inward investment and helping existing U.S. manufacturers increase their exports, which allows them to expand their current domestic operations and create opportunities for American workers.

During World Trade Week, May 19-25, Secretary Wilbur Ross will welcome U.S. companies to the Department of Commerce to present the President’s “E” Award. The award was created in 1961 by Executive Order of the President in recognition of a firm or organization that has made significant contributions to the increase of American exports. This year, there will be more than 40 companies receiving the award for export growth, demonstrating how American private enterprise can not only survive, but thrive, in the international market.

The work performed by ITA personnel located domestically and abroad is a critical contribution to the pro-growth agenda of the Trump Administration. We continue to produce remarkable results through promoting U.S. exports, attracting inward investment, and leveling the playing field for U.S. companies. In the last two years, ITA has assisted over 50,000 U.S. companies supporting $182 billion in U.S. exports. We also facilitated more than $22 billion in foreign investment into the United States; initiated 158 antidumping and countervailing duty cases; and successfully removed, reduced, or prevented 138 foreign trade barriers.

In the month ahead, ITA looks forward to highlighting the importance of international trade and its pivotal role in providing American workers and businesses with the chance to compete in a world economy in which competitive fairness rewards hard work and innovation. I encourage you to follow ITA on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn as we share coverage from a series of events throughout the month.

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World Trade Month Spotlight: Commerce Department Supports U.S. Small Business Exports!

May 31, 2018

This post contains external links. Please review our external linking policy.

Yuki Fujiyama is a trade finance specialist in the Office of Finance and Insurance Industries and the author of the Trade Finance Guide: A Quick Reference for U.S. Exporters.  Tricia Van Orden is the Deputy Director of the Trade Promotion Coordinating Committee Secretariat.

May is World Trade Month!  It is a fitting opportunity for the U.S. Department of Commerce to reiterate its commitment to helping U.S. companies enter and become successful in global markets.  It is also an opportunity to highlight how the Department supports U.S. exports, especially for small businesses.

Photo of U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross delivering keynote remarks at the 2018 EXIM Bank Annual Conference.

U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross delivers keynote remarks at the 2018 EXIM Bank Annual Conference.

U.S. Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross welcomed nearly 1,000 participants from around the world by delivering the keynote address at the U.S. Export-Import Bank Annual Conference in Washington D.C.  Many participants were small U.S. businesses seeking information on how to succeed in global markets. During his remarks, Secretary Ross emphasized the importance of helping American small businesses navigate international trade and finance to grow their global footprint.

Photo of U.S. Commerce Deputy Assistant Secretary for Services James Sullivan (Center, 2nd Row) joining the Commerce Department exhibitor team at the 2018 EXIM Bank Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.

U.S. Commerce Deputy Assistant Secretary for Services James Sullivan (Center, 2nd Row) joins the Commerce Department exhibitor team at the 2018 EXIM Bank Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.

To echo the sentiment expressed in the Secretary’s keynote address, five Department of Commerce agencies sponsored an exhibit booth and provided export assistance information and counseling to more than 150 conference participants, including small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Agency representatives from the International Trade Administration, U.S. Census Bureau, Bureau of Industry and Security, Minority Business Development Agency and the National Institute of Standard and Technology met with attendees on strategy and planning, financing, business expansion, advocacy, dispute resolution, how to obtain trade statistics using the Harmonized System, as well as export license requirements.

Read below for more information about each of the agencies that attended the conference:

International Trade Administration (ITA)

ITA is the U.S. government’s lead export promotion agency.  Organized into three business units: 1) Global Markets; 2) Industry and Analysis; and 3) Enforcement and Compliance, ITA plays an important role in helping U.S. businesses, especially SMEs, enter and compete in global markets through export counseling and customized solutions, from how to get products through customs to commercial diplomacy, such as breaking down trade barriers.

U.S. Census Bureau

Census is one of the leading sources of quality data about the nation’s people and economy and is the official source for U.S. export and import trade statistics.  In addition, Census provides valuable resources and training on utilizing trade data, understanding the Foreign Trade Regulations and using the Automated Commercial Environment.

Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS)

BIS administers and enforces the Export Administration Regulations, including issuing licenses for the export, reexport, and transfer (in-country) of commercial, military, and dual-use items, as well as for certain activities of U.S. persons.  The BIS Office of Exporter Services is the first line of contact for U.S. exporters and other trade professionals seeking information and assistance regarding export license requirements for the items and activities mentioned.

Minority Business Development Agency (MBDA)

MBDA is the only federal agency dedicated to promoting the growth of and global competitiveness of minority-owned business enterprises (MBEs), the many of which are SMEs.  To help expand access to global market for American MBEs, MBDA recently established four new export centers in Chicago, Miami, Sacramento, and San Antonio.

National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST)

NIST is a non-regulatory federal agency charged with promoting innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology.  In 2006, the NIST Manufacturing Extension Partnership and ITA jointly launched ExporTech, a unique national program designed to help U.S. small manufacturers enter or expand in global markets.  Since 2006, ExportTech has helped over 1,000 manufactures in 34 states and Puerto Rico.

Together, these agencies play a critical role in supporting and promoting U.S. small business exports through a diverse array of programs. Those who received information or counseling from Department of Commerce representatives at the recent EXIM Bank Annual are ready to take the next step in advancing their business ventures in global markets!

Visit us on the web to learn more about how to enter, grow, and succeed in global markets.